#4
I'd stick with the SM 58 for recording, they are really nice! Beta 58s are mor for instrument recording, if im not mistaken.
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Last edited by Yo_I_<3_Guitar at Jun 22, 2010,
#6
vocal style and budget? the sm58 is a solid choice for live vocals, and it works well enough for recorded vocals a lot of the time. works well for recording growling/screaming/whateveritscalled. for a less intense style of vocals, i would start looking into some condensor mics. they usually do a better job on vocals, they can capture more of the nuances and stuff. they pick up more of the sound, though thats not really the way to describe it. blegh, cant think straight right now

anyway, what kind of budget we looking at here?
#7
take a look at the frequency response charts to see how they're all different. 58's are generally considered the standard live vocal mic. the beta58s are taking over a bit, but i know a lot of people that prefer a beta57 for live vocals.

if they said "shure 58" you can be about 95% sure that they meant a Shure sm58. if they meant anything else, they would have specified. that or they dont know anything about mics.

as was said, 58s are ok for recording screams, but for real singing, you'll probably want a condenser.
#8
Really the only choices on there are the SM 58, The Beta 58, as the SM58S comes with a switch, thats the only difference.

The Beta 58 is supercardiod while the SM58 is cardiod, this means you are going to get a tighter pickup range on the Beta 58, which really isn't that big of a deal in studio vocals. It also has a heavier bass rolloff that can help with unwanted bass resulting from singing too close to the mike.

Personally I'd try the Beta 58, I've never used it but having used the SM58, I can say it's mainly good for rough vocals, but not really anything cleanly sung. The Beta might do a little better with a slightly increased midrange and high end bump.

You can get a cheap condenser mic for around 90-150 dollars that can do the job a little better, but you need to have an interface that has phantom power, this is usually marked by a button that says "+48Volts"
Last edited by Rakoro at Jun 22, 2010,
#9
Quote by jof1029
vocal style and budget? the sm58 is a solid choice for live vocals, and it works well enough for recorded vocals a lot of the time. works well for recording growling/screaming/whateveritscalled. for a less intense style of vocals, i would start looking into some condensor mics. they usually do a better job on vocals, they can capture more of the nuances and stuff. they pick up more of the sound, though thats not really the way to describe it. blegh, cant think straight right now

anyway, what kind of budget we looking at here?

I'd like to be able to record any type of vocals - both rough and clean. If I need 2 mics for that thats ok. I'd like to spend under $300 for both.
#10
According to some reviews of the beta's and sm58s, these sound better:
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/search.php?s=encore&go=Search

Haven't used them personally, but blue mics are usually pretty highly regarded, and sweetwater allows you to return items.
You can also call their sales department and talk to them for some advice on selecting mics tailored to your voice and your applications.
#11
Quote by jfreyvogel
What is the difference between all of these mics? I want to start recording vocals, and I was recommended a Shure 58, but there are so many types.


all have a different tone and are made for different things.

I suggest starting with the Shure SM58. It's a must have in any studio and works for just about any situation from micing amps to vocals to drums and other things.
#12
Quote by moody07747
all have a different tone and are made for different things.

I suggest starting with the Shure SM58. It's a must have in any studio and works for just about any situation from micing amps to vocals to drums and other things.

Ok, thank you. I'll pick up one of these next paycheck.
#13
Quote by jfreyvogel
Umm, so I have one person saying don't use 58's to record and one person saying do...


That's subjectivity for you. There's no concrete answer.

Quote by moody07747
all have a different tone and are made for different things.

I suggest starting with the Shure SM58. It's a must have in any studio and works for just about any situation from micing amps to vocals to drums and other things.


Not really correct. For amps and drums, the SM57 seems to be the preference, the 58 is really only used for vocals.

And in regards to the TS, it really depends what type of music you're recording. If it's something like rock music, then yeah, you're probably good with an SM58. If you're wanting to record something where detail is important and you want to pick up every little part of the recording, I'd look at getting a condenser microphone rather than a dynamic.
#14
Quote by Ziphoblat
And in regards to the TS, it really depends what type of music you're recording. If it's something like rock music, then yeah, you're probably good with an SM58. If you're wanting to record something where detail is important and you want to pick up every little part of the recording, I'd look at getting a condenser microphone rather than a dynamic.

Well I write with a lot of variety. vocal styles may be anything from Porcupine Tree / Insurgentes to Isis to Opeth, etc.. I was hoping that the mic could do all kinds of vocals but if I need to get two instead that's ok.
#15
Quote by jfreyvogel
Well I write with a lot of variety. vocal styles may be anything from Porcupine Tree / Insurgentes to Isis to Opeth, etc.. I was hoping that the mic could do all kinds of vocals but if I need to get two instead that's ok.


Well, because a condenser microphone is powered, it's a lot more sensitive than a dynamic microphone, resulting (ironically) in a condenser being more dynamic. For any sort of pop, jazz, acoustic, or probably most 'softer' songs, a condenser is going to be far more appropriate.

A dynamic microphone will sound a lot less natural than a condenser (in comparison), but this usually works effectively in the setting of heavier music, where the vocals are a little less up-front.
#16
The SM58s are, in essence, a SM57 with a windscreen on them. If you look at a side by side comparison of the frequency and range of them, they are nearly identical. The Beta58s are meh. My buddy has one and hes pretty disappointed with it.

Invest in a condenser for vocals
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#17
For studio work, I would say that a 57 would be better, mainly preference and design, the 58 was designed to be used for vocals live, and the 57 for studio work or instruments, I know the frequency responses are a little different, but I'd suggest for $300 an sm57 and a Rode NTA1, though I can't check prices In $$$ as I'm in the UK

EDIT: On second though, if you wanna record screams, get the 58, and then the NTA1 for the clean vocals, i think it'll go a little ovrr $300 though, not sure
Last edited by theepiczebra at Jun 23, 2010,
#18
SM7B

Slightly over budget, but a brilliant vocal mic that works well with all styles.
#19
Quote by mh.666
SM7B

Slightly over budget, but a brilliant vocal mic that works well with all styles.



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#20
Quote by Ziphoblat
That's subjectivity for you. There's no concrete answer.


Not really correct. For amps and drums, the SM57 seems to be the preference, the 58 is really only used for vocals.

And in regards to the TS, it really depends what type of music you're recording. If it's something like rock music, then yeah, you're probably good with an SM58. If you're wanting to record something where detail is important and you want to pick up every little part of the recording, I'd look at getting a condenser microphone rather than a dynamic.


the 57 and 58 are the same mic...just one has a pop filter.
Look up the spec sheets for both and you'll see a tiny change in the frequency response but that's just because of the pop filter sheld.

The capsules on the two mics are the same.
#21
Quote by moody07747
the 57 and 58 are the same mic...just one has a pop filter.
Look up the spec sheets for both and you'll see a tiny change in the frequency response but that's just because of the pop filter sheld.

The capsules on the two mics are the same.


I'm aware of that, my point was that having that on your mic detracts from it slightly when recording an instrument, hence why the 57 is used a lot more than the 58 for recording snares, amps, etc.