#1
I came up with a lick, I know all of the notes used in it, but i dont know how to take those notes and find what scale they belong too.

do i start with the lowest note used and go up by each note until I have used all of the notes?

Sorry if i am not making this clear enough but i have the notes (from lowest to highest)

[ G# (or Ab) - A# (or Bb) - C - C# (or Db) - D - E - F - G ]

and i need to know how to find what scale they belong to, I dont know much theory just the very basics and I feel if i learned how to do this it would help improve my theory greatly so if somebody could walk me through the process of finding a scale using the notes i gave as an example then mad props and kudos will be given

Sorry if this is a dumb question

excuse my grammar
#2
Well certain keys have certain sharps or flats. If your in a "sharp" key the F is always sharp. You have an F natural so it has to be a "flat key". B flat is always the first flat, then E flat, then A flat, then D flat. So you are in the key of A flat which has 4 flats and the E is probably just an accidental.
#3
Quote by salgala2000
Well certain keys have certain sharps or flats. If your in a "sharp" key the F is always sharp. You have an F natural so it has to be a "flat key". B flat is always the first flat, then E flat, then A flat, then D flat. So you are in the key of A flat which has 4 flats and the E is probably just an accidental.


Thank you for your help
#4
Your lick uses some chromaticism (notes which don't fit into a specific diatonic scale). This makes it a little more difficult to determine which scale it's based off of.

What you're going to do is find out what the root is (by listening to where the song resolves) and examine all the other notes in terms of that root.

Could you write out how the lick goes (or are those notes you wrote out already written as they are played)?
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#5
Well I can tell you right now that those notes don't clearly indicate any scale in particular. To figure out which scale would be most appropriate we'd really need to have a look at the riff or lick in question.

First thing is you've got an extra note in there, most common scales only have 7 notes in them. That doesn't mean you can't use an extra note, it just means you need to figure out which note it actually is.

Unfortunately in this case, there is no real answer that I can easily see.

The order of #s are FCGDAEB
The order of bs are BEADGCF

What that means is if there is a G#, then every note before it should also be sharp (so F# C# G#) if you have an E# then FCGDA and E all should be sharp.

The same principals apply to Flats, if you're using a Db then BEA and D will all be flat.

Mixing sharps and flats is a no-no.

The notes you've listed don't really adhere to these rules, so you're either using a lot of notes from outside your key (which is just fine) or you're using an exotic scale of some form. Either way, it makes it much harder to identify what you've done, without actually being able to hear or see it.
#6
Quote by food1010
Your lick uses some chromaticism (notes which don't fit into a specific diatonic scale). This makes it a little more difficult to determine which scale it's based off of.

What you're going to do is find out what the root is (by listening to where the song resolves) and examine all the other notes in terms of that root.

Could you write out how the lick goes (or are those notes you wrote out already written as they are played)?



|--15-------------12---13--------------9----8---|
|------15--13----------------11----9-------------|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
Last edited by Littleangus44 at Jun 22, 2010,
#7
Quote by icronic
Mixing sharps and flats is a no-no.
While I understand your point, in more complex harmony and theory this is wrong.

Case in point: A C7#9 chord uses C E G Bb D#. C E G A# D# would be incorrect, as would C E G Bb Eb.

Sorry to go into semantics, but I think when you're learning basic theory it's not the best to learn "never do ___" if more complex topics suggest otherwise, because it will only confuse you later.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#9
Quote by Littleangus44
|--15-------------12---13--------------9----8---|
|------15--13----------------11----9-------------|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
Sounds to me like the root note is either C or F

That gives you G D C E F Bb Ab Db C.

Looking at it with C as the root you have 5 2 1 3 4 b7 b6 b2 1.
With F as the root: 2 6 5 7 1 4 b3 b6 5.

Either way, it doesn't fit a single scale very well. It seems to progress through a few keys before returning back to the C, or does some serious alterations. You could look at it as going from F major to F minor, that seems pretty likely. It's hard to say without any more context though.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
Quote by food1010
Sounds to me like the root note is either C or F

That gives you G D C E F Bb Ab Db C.

Looking at it with C as the root you have 5 2 1 3 4 b7 b6 b2 1.
With F as the root: 2 6 5 7 1 4 b3 b6 5.

Either way, it doesn't fit a single scale very well. It seems to progress through a few keys before returning back to the C, or does some serious alterations. You could look at it as going from F major to F minor, that seems pretty likely. It's hard to say without any more context though.


Thanks for all youre help! i really appreciate it
#11
Quote by Littleangus44
|--15-------------12---13--------------9----8---|
|------15--13----------------11----9-------------|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|-----------------------------------------------------|


Sounds like C major to me. The b2, b6 and b7 are common enough accidentals, and the b2 is a very common chromatic way to get back to the root.