#1
i have started doing the lesssons on musictheory.net but i have noticed that it is centered around the piano. will this hinder my education at all? I am only playing electric guitar and nothing else.
#3
Quote by fupashredder
i have started doing the lesssons on musictheory.net but i have noticed that it is centered around the piano. will this hinder my education at all? I am only playing electric guitar and nothing else.


No, it won't hinder your education.

music is music. Guitar is just an instrument.

Most theory examples are written in standard notation.... often for piano.
shred is gaudy music
#5
Well I usually see people teaching theory with the piano, its kinda the starting point to all other instruments.
Quote by rockybo
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#6
my GUITAR teacher told me about that site so yeah it will help you out. it doesnt matter what instrument your playing ,music theory applies to every instrument
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Last edited by Rocketface2112 at Jun 22, 2010,
#7
Quote by theguitarplayin
yea dude. music is music. its actually probably better if you learn music theory and have ti actually apply it to a guitar. youll find that building chords is different

Building chords is the EXACT same. They just look different on piano keys than they do on a fretboard.
#8
Quote by fupashredder
i have started doing the lesssons on musictheory.net but i have noticed that it is centered around the piano. will this hinder my education at all? I am only playing electric guitar and nothing else.


In my opinion yes.

If you're going to be applying it to the guitar they should be studied concurrently or along with one another. An approach that brings the two together is the best and most linear and effective. Otherwise you're going to have a lot of head knowledge but no practical way to use it easily for the guitar, and what youll have to do is then go back and learn your guitar, neck notes etc, and from there apply what you learn in theory. Why not do both at the same time instead of two things at different times and still ahve that chasm.

Now once you know theory you can apply it to other instruments, even if your learning was based as guitar-centric learning.

I can go to a piano and apply theory concepts not even being a piano player, and get it dead on correct. A lot of my students commonly help those less knowledgeable by simply pointing out how and where to play it on the other persons instrument. Ive done this far too many times to count. Run into a chord like an augmented, or add9 and show the other guitarist where to put their fingers, or show keyboardist where to play upper extensions of a harmony part, for a Min 11th chord, etc.

And with due respect the chords are not always the exact same, many times a guitar or passage will use unisons, something a single piano does not have the ability to do.
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jun 23, 2010,
#9
One thing is that the piano / keys are a lot easier to learn theory or songwrite on. The piano has a huge range and is very linear / visual.
This is important when learning theory, because you can easily see how inversions work or the space between intervals. On a guitar, this isnt quite as obvious.
Same goes for 'standard' music notation and guitar tab.

Being able to assimilate theory before you also have to struggle with how that applies to your chosen instrument is key.

If you havent already, learn the notes of the keys and how to read notation. Print out a little cheatsheet. You dont even need to get good at it. You dont need to be able to actualy play the piano or sightread or anything. Just enough to know where the C and E keys are and a bit of knowledge on how to decipher notation and a wealth of knoweldge will open up.
#10
if you want to learn theory, you really have to be willing to look beyond the narrow scope of your own instrument. The purpose of studying theory is to broaden your understanding and perspective. If you find reading music for other instruments to be too much trouble how far do you expect to get?
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 23, 2010,
#11
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

there is some decent lessons on this site as well.
i think Sean0913 knows his stuff i would take that advice.

after learning some theory i was able to see the notes on the piano

i read the other day to start with key sig and intervals

if you want to learn theory, you really have to be willing to look beyond the narrow scope of your own instrument. The purpose of studying theory is to broaden your understanding and perspective. If you find reading music for other instruments to be too much trouble how far do you expect to get?


in a way i agree with that...but to be a beginner in theory..the simplest way is always the right way. its hard enough as it is..if you never played a piano you know nothing about it why start with that?? you didnt wanna learn piano you wanted to learn guitar so stick with what your faimler with. little by little you will progress and learn more things

altho theory is the same..you dont wanna get your confused..because the examples are on something you've never played. so it makes it harder then it should be.

switch back and forth if you want..learn intervals on the piano..then look at a guitar lesson on intervals..just try to learn it in a way you can understand..thats really what matters
Last edited by metalmetalhead at Jun 23, 2010,
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
if you want to learn theory, you really have to be willing to look beyond the narrow scope of your own instrument. The purpose of studying theory is to broaden your understanding and perspective. If you find reading music for other instruments to be too much trouble how far do you expect to get?


That is far from true or absolute. The purpose of learning theory is a question of motivation. I would guess that there are many different reasons a person wants to learn theory.

This "broadening of understanding and perspective" is the last thing I thought about when I was trying to learn theory. I didn't want some pie in the sky new agey thing, I wanted to play my guitar and I wanted to understand my guitar and I wanted to be able to express myself musically using options and ideas I'd never have come up with on my own, and I wanted to better be able to understand the music that I was hearing all around. But it was all about the guitar. If I hadn't been playing the guitar, theory would have had no useful purpose for me. I imagine the same is true of so many.

Now, as a by-product of my own journey into theory, yes I did gain perspective and my knowledge was certainly broadened, but that was never my purpose or point to learning it to begin with. That appreciation came after the fact.


Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jun 23, 2010,
#13
Quote by Sean0913
That is far from true or absolute. The purpose of learning theory is a question of motivation. I would guess that there are many different reasons a person wants to learn theory.


and all of them fall in the circle of a broadened perspective/ understanding. Which makes my statement true.


Quote by Sean0913

This "broadening of understanding and perspective" is the last thing I thought about when I was trying to learn theory. I didn't want some pie in the sky new agey thing, I wanted to play my guitar and I wanted to understand my guitar and I wanted to be able to express myself musically using options and ideas I'd never have come up with on my own, and I wanted to better be able to understand the music that I was hearing all around.


To me it sounds like broadening your perspective and understanding is exactly what you were after...... based on your own words.

Quote by Sean0913

Now, as a by-product of my own journey into theory, yes I did gain perspective and my knowledge was certainly broadened, but that was never my purpose or point to learning it to begin with. That appreciation came after the fact.


It's not a by-product. it's THE product. The fact that it took you so long to appreciate it is irrelevant.


Argument for argument sake is pointless.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 23, 2010,
#14
Quote by GuitarMunky
if you want to learn theory, you really have to be willing to look beyond the narrow scope of your own instrument. The purpose of studying theory is to broaden your understanding and perspective. If you find reading music for other instruments to be too much trouble how far do you expect to get?


i think your comment is inconsiderate and disrespectful.

i highly doubt you would appreciate the same kind of response.

i mean someone comes here asking for help and you say that? of all things..with all the stuff you know thats your best? come on dude..didnt your momma raise you better then that? i bet you wouldnt have said that to her

i agree with sean i learned theory to be a better musican..did i broaden my understanding? yes

is my perspective different? NO its the same..i still look at my guitar with the same passion and pleasure..and all the beautiful things the slick shiny strings give me..i just know more about it is all

and i still think of music as a gift.

but still..i dont learn to cook something i dont like, so i dont learn theory with a instrument i dont know how to play. why would i?

you should have answered his question instead of making a rude statment

you could call it being straight foward. but i call it rude
#15
Quote by metalmetalhead
i think your comment is inconsiderate and disrespectful.

i highly doubt you would appreciate the same kind of response.

i mean someone comes here asking for help and you say that? of all things..with all the stuff you know thats your best? come on dude..didnt your momma raise you better then that? i bet you wouldnt have said that to her

i agree with sean i learned theory to be a better musican..did i broaden my understanding? yes

is my perspective different? NO its the same..i still look at my guitar with the same passion and pleasure..and all the beautiful things the slick shiny strings give me..i just know more about it is all

and i still think of music as a gift.

but still..i dont learn to cook something i dont like, so i dont learn theory with a instrument i dont know how to play. why would i?

you should have answered his question instead of making a rude statment

you could call it being straight foward. but i call it rude


it's too bad you see it that way, because its honest advice, and I DID answer his question in my 1st post.

Take it or leave it. it's what I have to offer and I wouldn't post if I didn't think it would help.

and btw, It's not as rude as you mischaracterizing my post.


Quote by metalmetalhead


i agree with sean i learned theory to be a better musican..did i broaden my understanding? yes

is my perspective different? NO its the same.



If it hasn't broadened your perspective than you haven't learn anything.

Quote by metalmetalhead

but still..i dont learn to cook something i dont like, so i dont learn theory with a instrument i dont know how to play. why would i?


Well, because if your in a theory class, and the instructor gives you a homework assignment, that is written in standard notation, for piano...... You would have no way of completing the assignment and learning the lesson. So being willing to look beyond your own instrument actually is essential in that case.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 23, 2010,
#16
dang..your right

i feel terrible

i am rude

im going to go think about what i did

Perspective (cognitive), one's "point of view", the choice of a context for opinions, beliefs and experiences

Perspective (visual), the way in which objects appear to the eye.

from my point of view my guitar is my guitar its my way of expressing myself
my belief in music is strong it comes from the soul. it comes from the lord
my experiences are chills when i hear a certain tune. thats how i know i love it
because i feel it.

its your outlook on music.
when you think of music do you think of scales? sharps flats? modes? notes? theory?
maybe you do but i dont.

my knowledge has increased tho. along with arrogant ego and rude remarks i feel terrible
Last edited by metalmetalhead at Jun 23, 2010,
#17
Quote by metalmetalhead
dang..your right

i feel terrible

i am rude

im going to go think about what i did


na its okay man. I'll get over it.


Quote by metalmetalhead


Perspective (cognitive), one's "point of view", the choice of a context for opinions, beliefs and experiences

Perspective (visual), the way in which objects appear to the eye.

c. The ability to perceive things in their actual interrelations or comparative importance

and point of view...ofcourse.


Quote by metalmetalhead

from my point of view my guitar is my guitar its my way of expressing myself
my belief in music is strong it comes from the soul. it comes from the lord
my experiences are chills when i hear a certain tune. thats how i know i love it
because i feel it.


Thats all great, and I feel similar for the most part. Still though..... not really what Im talking about in terms of perspective.


Quote by metalmetalhead

when you think of music do you think of scales? sharps flats? modes? notes? theory?
maybe you do but i dont..

Na, I don't think of those things.... they aren't music.... any more than letters and punctuation are a novel. Or numbers and symbols are a math equation.


Anyway, you can still play music from the "soul" and experience chills AND enjoy music theory.

If you choose not to study it...... thats fine as well. You don't need any justification other than you simply aren't interested in it.

My ONLY point was that if you are interested in it..... you're going to have to be learn a few things.... like how to read music written for piano. and if you truly want to..... you'll do it with no complaints.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 23, 2010,
#18
yeah I started doing that musictheory.net thing yesterday as well. Ive done up to Natural Minor scale. First of all, I have to say it really does help me understand my guitar better and how music works. I never knew all about half notes, whole notes, quarter etc etc. And alot of it does apply well to the guitar, its just a matter of really UNDERSTANDING the theories and then seeing it work on the guitar.

On the other hand, now that I see how technical the guitar is and music in general, when I just want to play for the fun of it, I feel sort of chained down to applying all the theories and I feel like everything I play sounds wrong just because its not in the musictheory thing. I dont know why I feel this way... before I started reading up on it, I would play whatever sounded cool to me, now I feel like I have to play "by the book" so to speak. Did anyone else feel this way when they learned theory?
#19
Quote by ThrashKing


On the other hand, now that I see how technical the guitar is and music in general, when I just want to play for the fun of it, I feel sort of chained down to applying all the theories and I feel like everything I play sounds wrong just because its not in the musictheory thing. I dont know why I feel this way... before I started reading up on it, I would play whatever sounded cool to me, now I feel like I have to play "by the book" so to speak. Did anyone else feel this way when they learned theory?


absolutely. VERY Common.

don't worry about it too much. It's a phase.

You may want to spend some time away from theory.... like just pick a song you like. Play it... listen.... appreciate.

If you balance that with the studies... then the fancy words shouldn't get in the way any more..... you'll start seeing them as the descriptions they are, rather than rules to follow.

So don't feel like you have to "play by the book".... by all means study the book, but be your own artist.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 23, 2010,
#20
Quote by GuitarMunky
absolutely. VERY Common.

don't worry about it too much. It's a phase.

You may want to spend some time away from theory.... like just pick a song you like. Play it... listen.... appreciate.

If you balance that with the studies... then the fancy words shouldn't get in the way any more..... you'll start seeing them as the descriptions they are, rather than rules to follow.

So don't feel like you have to "play by the book".... by all means study the book, but be your own artist.

Im trying to do that, Actually I can play solos alot better now that I know how they are made up (I think I read about that on a diff website though).