#1
I'm hopless at improvising.
I never know what scales to use and i think my phasing sucks too.
HELP ME HELP ME
#2
Do you know how scales and chords are constructed?
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#3
Yes, i know how they are constructed, but finding the notes around the guitar is pretty hard for me.
#4
a good improviser is someone who is very familiar with the fretboard, and the only way to become familiar with the fretboard is to spend time with it.

how long have you been playing?
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#5
Yeah, basically practice. Start with very simple phrasing. You're never going to be able to find sophisticated phrases before you learn the layout of the fretboard. Just keep focusing on playing the melodies you hear in your head, never get ahead of yourself or you'll be swimming.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#6
8 years.
i can physically play most stuff, but my theory is pretty bad.
I guess i just need to remember the note names on the fretboard.
Then i can really put scales and etc into practise.
#7
Quote by stargazer5000
but my theory is pretty bad.

I know some people really harp on this, but LEARN your theory. Specifically, I recommend you memorize the modes.

Also, I'd recommend thinking of the fretboard as a liner pattern. In other words, instead of thinking of scales as a bunch of boxes and such, think of the scales as a tool to string notes together. Basically, just don't get caught up into the whole "the Aminor scale is in the 5th position, the Gminor is in the 4th, (etc.)" idea. Approach it as "I know the Aminor scale includes the notes: A, B, C, D, E, F, & G. How can I string together patterns, licks, or riffs using those notes?". That opens up new doors I think, or at least it did for me.
#8
Do you know any patterns or box shapes? Those help immensely. But be careful not to depend on them. Make you you know what the notes in the patterns work and how scales are formed.
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#10
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
I know some people really harp on this, but LEARN your theory. Specifically, I recommend you memorize and understand the major scale.

Also, I'd recommend thinking of the fretboard as a liner pattern. In other words, instead of thinking of scales as a bunch of boxes and such, think of the scales as a tool to string notes together. Basically, just don't get caught up into the whole "the Aminor scale is in the 5th position, the Gminor is in the 4th, (etc.)" idea. Approach it as "I know the Aminor scale includes the notes: A, B, C, D, E, F, & G. How can I string together patterns, licks, or riffs using those notes?". That opens up new doors I think, or at least it did for me.

Fixed. Everything else is good though.

Really, TS, practice. A lot of practice. Turn on the radio and solo to the songs there. It doesn't matter if a solo is going on or not... just do it. I've soloed to Allan Holdsworth all the while he was soloing. It can sound pretty bad if you and him/them are doing drastically different things, but it doesn't matter what it sounds like together.

Fretboard knowledge is your very best friend. Learn it like you know your own body. Better, if possible. Make sure you know all the notes.

Theory-wise I recommend chord construction and diatonic harmony first. After you get a great (NOTE: Great... not good) foundation in this is when, and only when, you should move onto modes. It will make them A LOT easier. I yell this all the time, but feel like I'm the only one doing so, learning to write 4-Part Chorales will help you IMMENSELY. It'll teach you the reason certain progressions work and it'll help you with voice-leading (AKA: soloing) as well as being able to use non-chord tones between, and on, chords.
#12
Scales, intervals, exercises, theoretical knowledge... It's all good to know.

But it's all useless without using the most important tool at your disposal. Use your ears. Listen to other great players. Listen until you can hear what you want to play in your head. Once you can hear it in your head, all you have to do is play it. That's the easy part.
#13
Quote by stargazer5000
I'm hopless at improvising.
I never know what scales to use and i think my phasing sucks too.
HELP ME HELP ME


You need to understand, just to start with, what a Key of Music is, how to construct a major scale, and then how to play over a key. Until you get that or a really well developed ear that can pick out the pitches the hard way, you will struggle unnecessarily as a musician. What I am saying is, help yourself. Learn music theory, and then you'll be able to improvise. Commit at least 6 months to it, before losing patience and just "jamming".

Its worth it.
#14
You know all those lessons about speed, one of the biggest points they make in a more blunt term is..."Muscle memory" The fact that you're playing a scale correctly, and starting off slow will help you to later play that scale correctly and fast.
It's the same concept here, at least for me I think of it as the same. Before trying to improvise, you should grab a pen and paper and write some riffs and solos and chord progressions and whatever you, just write it down. As you learn music theory, try to incorporate those into what you write down. After you write a phrase down, you can test it out and make sure you like it on the guitar, play around with it a bit.
From doing this you're really getting several things out of it that will help you do some sick improvs for your friends. 1. You're truly understanding what you're learning, for example.. you can read about modes and understand modes.. then go to play a mode and realize you don't really understand it.. thus you go back and reread over it till you get it. 2. As you solo now, you're just playing around on a neck trying to create music. But as you practice writing down the music, you'll quickly realize what you like. Which scales are your favorites, in what key.. what sort of techniques work best for your "voice", then when you go to improvise something you'll know what you want to do with it from the start. 3. As you write the songs, again, you'll find you like certain things.. And as you're writing these songs and practicing it on the guitar you'll get use to doing them until it becomes natural.. then when you're going to do an improvise you'll notice pieces of the songs you've written in the past might find their way in.

This has really helped me! I'm not great at soloing, but I see myself getting better the more and more I write.
#16
Best way I learned to imporve was by learning other solos that I liked, then jamming along to other songs. Simple as that. My imporv's pretty good now, but I did used to jam alot with other musicians, drummers guitarists etc. These are all good ways to improve your improve.

Learn guitar solo improvisation here.
#17
Start learning to LISTEN!!!! experiment with what you know and how it ffects the sound and continue until you find a good way of applying what you already know. If all you know is the minor pentatonic shape... you can do amazing things with that alone. Really!

So start to listen to how you would like it to sound... your own inner voice... and build on it from there...

Sure, if you want to learn theory then go for it... but learning to listen to notes and how they affect certain chord progs really does so much more. Your ear counts more than a knowledge of the fretboard, imo. Knowing both will not harm you... knowing only the ear will accomplish more than many tech heads can do. My opinion though... use it, don't use it.

You can train your ear with Earmaster pro. You can learn how to read sheet as well if you want. Its a very versatile program and quite cheap. http://www.earmaster.com/pro/
#18
learning easy themes songs help train your ear too..tho it can be hard. i liked that video i think im going to start looking at music like that because he must be right......

but how it applys to the guitar...you may hear something but u dont know where to play it?
you live and learn.
#19
Quote by metalmetalhead
learning easy themes songs help train your ear too..tho it can be hard. i liked that video i think im going to start looking at music like that because he must be right......

but how it applys to the guitar...you may hear something but u dont know where to play it?
you live and learn.


Jazz is an improvisational art, and he's a jazz pianist...so pretty much everything he says can be applied to guitar. I'm glad you liked it though, I got linked to it a while ago and it helped me out a lot
#20
For phrasing, try using the rhythm pyramid: playing whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, eighth notes, eighth note triplets, sixteenth notes, sixteenth note quintuplets, and sixteenth note sextuplets in that sequence for X bars. Use any notes you want and pick a tempo you can handle perfectly. Eventually start switching up the sequence, going back and forth between eighth and sixteenth note feels, triplets and eighth notes, sixteenth notes with an odd one out, be creative.

Next, try guided improvising - think about different ideas you could use in your solos. We'll say you wanted to work on sliding and bending. For five minutes, try and use a lot of sliding. For five minutes, use a lot of bends. Then, for another five minutes, try and combine both techniques in your licks.

Last, try limited improvising. Make rules. A couple examples are that you can't play the same string twice, or that you can only use two strings, stuff like that. Again, be creative.

As for when you actually improvise, here are a couple ideas too.