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#1
thought i share my schedule comment it and share yours
Warm up 10 mins
Practice Songs 1 hour
Improvise and write music 1 hour
Speed building and tapping techniques 2 hours
Study music theory 1 hour
Ear Training 1 hour
Sweep Picking and Lagato techniques 2 hours
Read music 30 mins
scales/modes 1 hour
Chords 1 hour
Tomorrow i'll be doing this as much as i can possible throughout the summer.
Donnell McKnignt
#2
Quote by DonnellMcKnight
thought i share my schedule comment it and share yours
Warm up 10 mins
Practice Songs 1 hour
Improvise and write music 1 hour
Speed building and tapping techniques 2 hours
Study music theory 1 hour
Ear Training 1 hour
Sweep Picking and Lagato techniques 2 hours
Read music 30 mins
scales/modes 1 hour
Chords 1 hour
Tomorrow i'll be doing this as much as i can possible throughout the summer.

So your trying to tell me you spend 10 hours and 40 mins a day on music related material? Let me guess, you dont eat or sleep either huh?
#5
Quote by jfreyvogel
Even I think this is pretty ridiculous and I generally try for 3-5 hours a day which is considered by most to be a lot.

Yeah, maybe this dude was talking about his WHOLE summer schedule or something like that. There is NO way somebody could spend that much time a day on musical stuff. Unless they where immortal and needed no sleep or some shit.
#6
Quote by ThrashKing
So your trying to tell me you spend 10 hours and 40 mins a day on music related material? Let me guess, you dont eat or sleep either huh?


+1

I admire your dedication, but I would question weather all 10 hours are very focussed. Nice range of topics, but I think you could befinit from putting some kind of variation in your routine. A 10 Hour routine is a pretty big ask, what happens if you sleep in one day, or have to go to a doctors visit, or play a gig, or go buy a CD, or have a jam with another guitar player, etc. Does your practicing go down the drain that day. Because our lives are not solid and non-changing in form, I think a practice routine that pretty much demands you have no other stuff happening beside music is a little unrealistic.

Anyway, I do admire your dedication and hope it works out for you
Last edited by jesse music at Jun 23, 2010,
#7
oh yeah i forgot i dont really do all of that in one day ! well i have done all that but only once! i just pick out like 3 subjects/sections and focus on those a day
Donnell McKnignt
#9
Quote by DonnellMcKnight
oh yeah i forgot i dont really do all of that in one day ! well i have done all that but only once! i just pick out like 3 subjects/sections and focus on those a day


Probably a little more realistic, but whatever works for you.

Keep in mind in regaurds for learning there are 3 main aspects

-Duration (the amount of time you spend doing something)
-Regularity (the amount of time between repetitions of learning the material)
-Quality (in relation to guitar practice, the economy of motion, and relaxation, in regaurds to everything else and guitar practice as well, the awareness and focus of your mind on the task at hand)
#10
Quote by DonnellMcKnight
oh yeah i forgot i dont really do all of that in one day ! well i have done all that but only once! i just pick out like 3 subjects/sections and focus on those a day


It's hard to improve on any aspect of your playing if you only touch on it once a week
#11
I don't ever believe that guitar gods actually did practice for 10 hours a day. You don't believe me? How many of us can name one guitarist who played a concert for 10 hours. Three hours is the basic max length of any concert on the face of earth. Me? I practice the tme length of a concert everyday just like Kerry F King.
#12
Quote by Joshua1207
I just do what I feel like doing that day whether it be learn some theory, learn a new song, jam out, etc. I know that's probably not good to become much better though.
This is what I do. If you're motivated enough, you'll get plenty of practice in. I don't need a regime to motivate me.

Actually I really hardly ever practice bass by myself anymore unless I want to learn a song, but that's mostly because I find that the areas I need the most practice in I can't really work on individually (such as timing/ensemble in a band/jam setting, melodic/harmonic control when playing off of chords, in a band/jam setting as well). I guess that's kind of irrelevant though. I do practice guitar a lot by myself.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#13
Quote by DonnellMcKnight
thought i share my schedule comment it and share yours
Warm up 10 mins
Practice Songs 1 hour
Improvise and write music 1 hour
Speed building and tapping techniques 2 hours
Study music theory 1 hour
Ear Training 1 hour
Sweep Picking and Lagato techniques 2 hours
Read music 30 mins
scales/modes 1 hour
Chords 1 hour
Tomorrow i'll be doing this as much as i can possible throughout the summer.


not realistic and likely not very effective IMO.

I would recommend putting your focus on music and building a repertoire. Keep in mind playing a piece of music .....

- trains your ear
- gives you experience with techniques (tapping, sweeping....ect)
- gives you experience with chords, scales and modes.

That covers alot of your chosen issues right there...... and in context, which is very important.

Beyond that, you may want to focus on ...

- Reading music
- practicing particular techniques that give you trouble, and are necessary to play music in your repertoire.
- studying theory
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 23, 2010,
#15
Agree with Munky (which seems to happen a lot lately).

10 hours? Go for it if you want, but 2 hours of focused intense practice beats 10 hours of plain routine any day.

But instead of focusing on all those things individually, think about combining it all. What I do for practice is pick a random jazz standard. Play it, learn it, solo over it etc. You'll work on:
1. Reading
2. Timing
3. Chords
4. Memorization of chord movement
5. Chord scales, modes etc.
6. Fretboard knowledge
7. Arpeggios

That's realistic practice also. If you go out for a gig to stand in for a band (no matter the genre) they'll probably have a lead sheet. If you can sight-read that sheet, you get the gig. They aren't going to ask "Hey play an E lydian for us and then you get the gig". They're going to ask you to play that lead sheet. So might as well practice in a form that will be directly related to what you're going to do.

My 2 cents
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
#16
Quote by fc89konkari
wheres the 'playing for fun'?


Not only that,

When are you going to listen to music?
#17
Quote by Blurry 505
Agree with Munky (which seems to happen a lot lately).

10 hours? Go for it if you want, but 2 hours of focused intense practice beats 10 hours of plain routine any day.

But instead of focusing on all those things individually, think about combining it all. What I do for practice is pick a random jazz standard. Play it, learn it, solo over it etc. You'll work on:
1. Reading
2. Timing
3. Chords
4. Memorization of chord movement
5. Chord scales, modes etc.
6. Fretboard knowledge
7. Arpeggios

That's realistic practice also. If you go out for a gig to stand in for a band (no matter the genre) they'll probably have a lead sheet. If you can sight-read that sheet, you get the gig. They aren't going to ask "Hey play an E lydian for us and then you get the gig". They're going to ask you to play that lead sheet. So might as well practice in a form that will be directly related to what you're going to do.

My 2 cents


There is a cool way of practicing just like you said, where you will push yourself like real life situations. You have 1 hour and choose 3 random stadards. You need to play the melody, the harmony and try to improvise over it, just like you woud do in a gig or if you would work as a session musician. As you sai this will develop a lot of your abilities and it makes you practice like you would do in the real world. The only counterpoint to this is that you might find harder material like the one you are looking at if you are learnin (like getting randomly giant steps and try to improvise over it).
Fender Telecaster Thin Line

(For playing fusion as a solo project)
Ernie Ball VP Jr
Vox Wah
Korg DT-10 Tuner
Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer
Mxr Phase 90
Electro Harmonix Small Clone
Boss DD6 Digital Delay
#18
not realistic and likely not very effective IMO.

I would recommend putting your focus on music and building a repertoire. Keep in mind playing a piece of music .....

- trains your ear
- gives you experience with techniques (tapping, sweeping....ect)
- gives you experience with chords, scales and modes. ...]

agree...building a 50 standard set list - or more (and knowing them in the most played keys) will develope your melodic sense and of course improve you solos

moving the melody to all playable octaves and playing it within the scales it is written will advance your seeing the harmonic/melodic relation and develope improvisation skills

you can spend less time and get more accomplished

play well

wolf
#19
yay! i'm so glad to see so many people in one thread agreeing! this doesn't happen much, especially in this forum :p


p.s. also doing it like we have described teaches you the notes on the fretboard (i'm unaware if you know them or not). but learning these things in real life situations, you'll be pretty surprised how much better you know the fretboard (and more quickly) than if you sat and said the names out loud one at a time. thought bout making a lesson on this, because there's been so many damn threads on it recently. but anyway, another good side to it

here is my schedule (to show an idea of what i'm saying)
I'm at berklee, so i need to practice this much, otherwise i probably wouldn't
Jazz Standard (Blue Bossa, Summertime, Autumn Leaves) - 15 min. each
Playing with the changes in the standards - 30 min. total
Country guitar rhythms - 15 min.
Country guitar licks - 15 min.
Blues turnarounds (more tricky than most people think) - 15 min.
Blues Solo Transcriptions (licks, intros, solos, etc.) - 15 min.
Blues rhythm (8 bar, 12 bar, quick 4 etc.) - 15 min.
Reading (anything, sheet music, standard whatever) 30 min.
Berklee Rhythms Book (nice to break from jazz) - 15 min.
Scales (flashcards are what I use) - 30 min.
Arpeggios (my weakest thing ever) - 30 min.

Totals a lot, but look how much I got done too. and also notice how fun most of that can be, and how it correlates. not claiming to be an expert, but after awhile you get an idea of how your attention span works
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
Last edited by Blurry 505 at Jun 23, 2010,
#20
You can allocate as many hours as you like to practicing guitar; but realistically, how much of that time will be spent GENUINELY practicing and not just fiddling around or repeating mundane exercises without paying attention to where improvement is required?

Good luck to you though, I wish I had that much free time on my hands - played for 20 minutes this week
#21
You know, there are multiple books out there that combine technique, theory, and practical application into one course.

Try any of the following.
- Rock Guitar Secrets by Peter Fischer
- Speed Mechanic for Lead Guitar by Troy Stetina
- Fretboard Mastery by Troy Stetina
- Fretboard Logic volumes 1-3

I was going to do a big long practice schedule like the one you suggested, but instead I decided to spend a little time on each of those books every day and then do some work with written music, improvising, and repertoire.

The biggest thing is to attack your weaknesses. That is the quickest road to progress.
#22
I had a workout when I was at school, and then my teacher told me why i should have goals and designate time for stuff, but planning out 4-5 hours is unnecesary.
So I have
One Hour: Warmup/workout
10 minutes-Rhythm Excersize (recording myself playing the G Major scale on a single string on every string, Whole notes on the low e, half on the a etc. up to sixteenths on the b and triplets on the high e.
20 minutes: One string scales (improvising over a drone in C, G, and D and adding a new scale every two days on the circle of fifths, singing with solfege)
10 minutes: C chromatic scale over a drone (up and down, triplets, double time, quarter note triplets, in cells of 3rds and 4ths sometimes).
20 minutes: Playing guitar and singing (working on Wagon Wheel and Alabama High Test by the old crow medicine show)

One Hour: Technique
melodic rhythms, scales, etudes etc

One Hour: Joe Viola Studies/playing tunes to a metronome/transcribing

one hour:
playing tunes

and then (this is sometimes consolodated into one hour)
One Hour: Ear training/sight singing-jazz ears by jamey aebersold and sightsinging from the ottman book.
one hour: euphonium practice-arban excersizes, interval excersizes, long tones, real music.
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Jun 25, 2010,
#23
Even conservatories tell their students that anything over 4 hours a day does more harm than good, you'll tire yourself out, risk injury, and your brain won't take in information as easily.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jun 25, 2010,
#24
how the hell do you have 10 hours a day to practice???? sounds a bit overkill or overexadurated
#25
Quote by griffRG7321
Even conservatories tell their students that anything over 4 hours a day does more harm than good, you'll tire yourself out, risk injury, and your brain won't take in information as easily.


Good to know.
#27
Learning one song in a day is good for me and I consider two hours playing pretty good, but ten hours man! If I did that guitar wouldn't be fun anymore
#28
Quote by tehREALcaptain
I had a workout when I was at school, and then my teacher told me why i should have goals and designate time for stuff, but planning out 4-5 hours is unnecesary.
So I have
One Hour: Warmup/workout
10 minutes-Rhythm Excersize (recording myself playing the G Major scale on a single string on every string, Whole notes on the low e, half on the a etc. up to sixteenths on the b and triplets on the high e.
20 minutes: One string scales (improvising over a drone in C, G, and D and adding a new scale every two days on the circle of fifths, singing with solfege)
10 minutes: C chromatic scale over a drone (up and down, triplets, double time, quarter note triplets, in cells of 3rds and 4ths sometimes).
20 minutes: Playing guitar and singing (working on Wagon Wheel and Alabama High Test by the old crow medicine show)

One Hour: Technique
melodic rhythms, scales, etudes etc

One Hour: Joe Viola Studies/playing tunes to a metronome/transcribing

one hour:
playing tunes

and then (this is sometimes consolodated into one hour)
One Hour: Ear training/sight singing-jazz ears by jamey aebersold and sightsinging from the ottman book.
one hour: euphonium practice-arban excersizes, interval excersizes, long tones, real music.



One hour to warm up? That consist of fiddling around? Why not use scales to warmup? BAM consolidated 2 things into one.
A chromatic scale? People very rarely utilize a chromatic scale, usually it's just a few half steps, so why practice that?
I think if you consolidated your routine and did multiple things you would see progress much quicker, and utilize less time doing it.

Only my opinion, please don't take any offense
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
#29
to above,
I completely understand.
I take an hour to warm up because those excersizes warm up my hands, mind and ears.
I do use scales, i play them for twenty minutes over a drone. improvising melodically and learning a new one one finger at a time (so up and down each string, 4 times). I do that because Mick Goodrick (who is, i beleive a professor at your college and wrote a groundbreaking instructional book called the advancing guitarist) says to. I practice the chromatic scale for technique, and i vocalise with it and do it over a recorded drone to get used to singing up and down the chromatic scale, and to help my hands warm up. The playing and singing is for fun and warms up my hands chord-wise and my voice for sight singing later and I do the timing excersize, again, because Mick Goodrick says to.
I do this because its easy, fun and saves me time on vocal warmups and ear training warmups, while also letting me practice my instrument. It also helps me build technique and work on fretboaerd knowledge. And everyone uses the chromatic scale, according to jamey aebersold (who i disagree with on most everything else) "it is the musical alphabet".

Again, no offense intended or taken.
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Jun 25, 2010,
#30
Quote by tehREALcaptain
And everyone uses the chromatic scale, according to jamey aebersold (who i disagree with on most everything else) "it is the musical alphabet".
Plus it's just a good exercise. It's like in a sport when you practice, you don't do practice drills in a competition, but they help prepare you with the skills necessary for the competition.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#31
I see where you're coming from, wouldn't agree with a lot but it does make sense!

Mike is also a hardcore jazz teacher, not that that's bad, just be careful. Those jazz teachers can be pretty crazy when it comes to techniques and exercises..

Edit: to the above, not to be a smartass, but in rugby we played scrimmages to mimic the real thing as close as possible
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
Last edited by Blurry 505 at Jun 26, 2010,
#32
Quote by spiderjump
I don't ever believe that guitar gods actually did practice for 10 hours a day. You don't believe me? How many of us can name one guitarist who played a concert for 10 hours. Three hours is the basic max length of any concert on the face of earth. Me? I practice the tme length of a concert everyday just like Kerry F King.


I'm not assuming its 10 hours straight, that would just be plain stupid, obviously he would be taking breaks.
#33
I don't have a set routine. I practice until i feel like i've pushed myself to the limit for that day. If i don't feel like stopping i won't, if i do i will. I only practice things that i'm weak on, and the stuff i'm strong on i just touch on them every so often to keep them up to scratch.
#34
I don't really have a concrete written practice schedule, being deployed makes that a bit difficult, and taking online courses, so my days pretty cramped. However, I'll take a song one day, rip it apart till I know what went in to making it. Next day, I'll practice the song. I need to really try play the melodies on other parts though, that does sound like a good idea! I also try to write my own music every now and then (just a couple of phrases), I write it on paper first of course, with what music theory I do have, then take it to the guitar.. Kinda works as a checking point as I learn theory and techniques, if it sounds good then that means I have a decent enough understanding of it, if not then I go back and fix it and relearn.. Anyways, I plan to do what the above have mentioned, and I also like using my idea because it helps me get a lot out of a short time. But really, its whatever works for you.
Last edited by sparta09 at Jun 26, 2010,
#35
Quote by griffRG7321
Even conservatories tell their students that anything over 4 hours a day does more harm than good, you'll tire yourself out, risk injury, and your brain won't take in information as easily.


What conservatories say that? At my college we're required to practice atleast 3 hours a day. Most of us aim for 5 to 6 during the semester.

You guys seem to have trouble understanding that that there are people who are truly dedicated to this art form and only want to get better. And the only way is practice.

Charlie Parker claimed to have practiced from 11 to 15 hours daily for the span of about 3 years and you know he was telling the truth when you hear him play. He ain't no guitarist but he's arguably the greatest saxophone player ever.
Duke Ellington - If it sounds good, it is good.
#38
Quote by Anything Goes
The teacher says 6 hours max, not 4.


yeah i didnt remember very well. But still 4-5 and 6 is pushing it, 10 hours is stupid.
#39
Quote by Anything Goes
Charlie Parker claimed to have practiced from 11 to 15 hours daily for the span of about 3 years and you know he was telling the truth when you hear him play. He ain't no guitarist but he's arguably the greatest saxophone player ever.
Playing saxophone for 10+ hours is a LOT easier on your body than guitar. Not to say you can't get tendonitis or carpal tunnel or something like that from saxophone, but depressing the keys is a lot easier than it is on guitar. As long as you have proper technique, there is much less risk of hurting yourself.

Plus all of your tone and techniques such as bending and all that comes from your embouchure (the muscles around your lip area). Your embouchure might get sore after a while, but that's something that more practice will strengthen rather than deteriorate.

Quote by bizcuits212
I'm not assuming its 10 hours straight, that would just be plain stupid, obviously he would be taking breaks.
That brings up a good point. When playing for longer periods of time, it's important to take 15-or-so minute breaks (every hour, I think I remember hearing, maybe every two) and letting your muscles completely relax, possibly stretching a bit. You shouldn't play for 4 or 5 hours (or more) without doing this. Maybe you should even do this during a 3 hour playing session.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jun 26, 2010,
#40
It's really presumptuous for a person to think they know the exact amount of time another person should practice.

The "right" amount of practice varies from person to person. The main thing to consider is whether or not you're making progress with your approach.

Some people have the ambition and time to literally play all day. Some have to balance it with other activities.... and may have other issues to consider.

We all have individual goals.... and individual lifestyles. Who's to say what's right amount of time for someone else to practice.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 26, 2010,
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