#1
So ive been playing guitar for two years now. But I'm self taught, and if anyone who has self taught themselves knows... you basically just play songs you like, then try to make cool riffs yourself. I have gotten a few books on beginner theory and pentatonic scale, so i am sort of educated on all that. But I cant even name the notes all the way down a string. I have no idea what an F sharp is or a C minor. I Know there cords, but I only know this because Ive tried to learn them, but to no avail. I just know certain chords because they sound good to me, not by their names or why they sound that way.

What im asking for help is, if anyone here knows any books or websites or anything that I can do to learn all this and help progress me as a guitar player and musician.

Sorry for the rant btw, thanks!
#3
Quote by gquady09
musictheory.net will teach you everything you need to know.

but thats on a fricken piano. I want to know for a guitar, or is it the same?
#4
Don't worry mate, the differences between piano and guitar are slight... well ok they've got 20x more octaves on the piano, but we've got distortion and bending *drool*
#5
Quote by ThrashKing
but thats on a fricken piano. I want to know for a guitar, or is it the same?


Music theory is universal for all tone instruments as far as I know. So yeah, you just have to learn it and apply it to the guitar. There are certain things specific for guitar like knowing what chords or intervals look like, but theory can be applied to any instrument. Just be sure to try it out after you learn it!
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#6
all right, so far its all just about the staffs and note duration. Its actually kind of interesting. I always thought music ( the classical way of writing it) was so hard and complicated to learn.
#7
It can be tricky at first, but most if not all of the great guitarists in history have extensive training in music theory. It will definitely help you improve as a player.
#8
Quote by ThrashKing
all right, so far its all just about the staffs and note duration. Its actually kind of interesting. I always thought music ( the classical way of writing it) was so hard and complicated to learn.

Just keep working on it

Music theory is like building a house. You start with the basics or the frame, and keep adding to what you had previously. The advanced concepts build upon previous concepts. Once you understand all the things that come before, it's generally pretty easy to pick up on the next step. Reading the staff and notes turns to keys and scales, then intervals and chords and so on and so forth.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#9
Quote by ThrashKing
So ive been playing guitar for two years now. But I'm self taught, and if anyone who has self taught themselves knows... you basically just play songs you like, then try to make cool riffs yourself. I have gotten a few books on beginner theory and pentatonic scale, so i am sort of educated on all that. But I cant even name the notes all the way down a string. I have no idea what an F sharp is or a C minor. I Know there cords, but I only know this because Ive tried to learn them, but to no avail. I just know certain chords because they sound good to me, not by their names or why they sound that way.

What im asking for help is, if anyone here knows any books or websites or anything that I can do to learn all this and help progress me as a guitar player and musician.

Sorry for the rant btw, thanks!


A lot of people I teach started that way, learning songs, and thats what hooked them to the guitar. You're right in that Music theory.net is based around the piano, and until you know the notes on the neck of the guitar, music theory is going to seem abstract as far as how to apply it. Thats why for years I have always started students out on learning the notes on the neck. So when they learn all their scales, they learn every starting point, or when they learn their triads and chords, they are like a walking encyclopedia because they can just look at the neck and find all the notes. The people here are right, though you can learn it from a piano based site, but you will still at some point need the notes on the neck of the guitar to bring it all home.

Best,

Sean
#11
Quote by gquady09
It can be tricky at first, but most if not all of the great guitarists in history have extensive training in music theory. It will definitely help you improve as a player.



so not true
#12
Quote by ThrashKing
So ive been playing guitar for two years now. But I'm self taught, and if anyone who has self taught themselves knows... you basically just play songs you like, then try to make cool riffs yourself. I have gotten a few books on beginner theory and pentatonic scale, so i am sort of educated on all that. But I cant even name the notes all the way down a string. I have no idea what an F sharp is or a C minor. I Know there cords, but I only know this because Ive tried to learn them, but to no avail. I just know certain chords because they sound good to me, not by their names or why they sound that way.

What im asking for help is, if anyone here knows any books or websites or anything that I can do to learn all this and help progress me as a guitar player and musician.

Sorry for the rant btw, thanks!


Prepare for studying theory:

- become proficient at reading music - ideally in all positions
( method book can get you there)

- build a decent sized repertoire of music
(music that you have memorized and can play well)

Study theory:

Take a class
take lessons
get a reputable book

Continue building your repertoire and honing your reading skills as you work you way through the theory lessons.

then put 2 and 2 together.


Quote by SeeEmilyPlay
Music Theory for Dummies... I'm not kidding they actually do a good job of breaking everything down in a way that's easier to understand than a lot of other literature I've read.



I've heard alot of people say they really like this book. Must be something to it.


Quote by gquady09
but most if not all of the great guitarists in history have extensive training in music theory. It will definitely help you improve as a player.


Well, this is far from true, but that shouldn't deter a person from wanting to study theory.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 23, 2010,
#14
Quote by metalmetalhead
While that looks like a really informative (long) article, I think he tried to put too much information in one article. I think it would have been better if he would have split it up into ten smaller articles and focused more on each individual topic. Most of those topics aren't topics you can read a paragraph on and have a firm grasp of.

Plus, his explanation of modes isn't very thorough and it's sort of out of place in "Learning Music Theory. The Beginning."
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jun 23, 2010,
#15
Quote by food1010
While that looks like a really informative (long) article, I think he tried to put too much information in one article. I think it would have been better if he would have split it up into ten smaller articles and focused more on each individual topic. Most of those topics aren't topics you can read a paragraph on and have a firm grasp of.

Plus, his explanation of modes isn't very thorough and it's sort of out of place in "Learning Music Theory. The Beginning."



+1
shred is gaudy music
#16
Quote by food1010
While that looks like a really informative (long) article, I think he tried to put too much information in one article. I think it would have been better if he would have split it up into ten smaller articles and focused more on each individual topic. Most of those topics aren't topics you can read a paragraph on and have a firm grasp of.

Plus, his explanation of modes isn't very thorough and it's sort of out of place in "Learning Music Theory. The Beginning."


If you dont have anything good to say..why say anything at all??
did you know theres no theory tab no more for music theory on this site..tho there used to me.

could you imagine trying to find all 10 articles? and if you know nothing of theory you don't know what to search for...god forbid you have to read something that long.

and it goes into the basics of everything..thats why its called the beginning..its just like a head up on whats to come.

no it doesnt go to deep into modes..but the modes are everywhere..one think i liked is it gave all the formulas which is great..if something in there isnt explained good..no ones perfect after reading that..research the things you didnt understand..and great articles are long theres also a lot of examples in there..i didnt learn none of them..but they do make the article seem longer...

keep in mind opinions like that could discourage someone from reading something that could help them. you could have atleast pasted another link to more informations since that article is sooo long...
#18
Quote by metalmetalhead
If you dont have anything good to say..why say anything at all??
did you know theres no theory tab no more for music theory on this site..tho there used to me.

could you imagine trying to find all 10 articles? and if you know nothing of theory you don't know what to search for...god forbid you have to read something that long.

and it goes into the basics of everything..thats why its called the beginning..its just like a head up on whats to come.

no it doesnt go to deep into modes..but the modes are everywhere..one think i liked is it gave all the formulas which is great..if something in there isnt explained good..no ones perfect after reading that..research the things you didnt understand..and great articles are long theres also a lot of examples in there..i didnt learn none of them..but they do make the article seem longer...

keep in mind opinions like that could discourage someone from reading something that could help them. you could have atleast pasted another link to more informations since that article is sooo long...
Easy there bud! I didn't mean to offend. It seems you took that a bit personally. I was just inputting some constructive criticism.

There is in fact a theory tab, in the columns section: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/music_theory/

Here's another link. It's the Crusade, which I still don't think is the best article (series) out there, but it's pretty in-depth for most of the basics: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?value=crusade&search_type=columns

The reason I said that about the modes is that article misleadingly oversimplifies them. They're not just alternate scales with cool-sounding names. Even if they were, music isn't about how many interesting scales you can use. It's about how you tie together notes, melodies, harmonies, as well as other structural elements such as phrases, verses, refrains, etc.

Now, this isn't to say modes are some mysterious long-lost knowledge. They're not all that difficult, but it's important to make a distinction between modal music and tonal music which that article doesn't even mention. You have to look at modes vs. scales in their individual contexts. Modal music is based on modes, whereas tonal music is based on keys. Modes are sets of notes with a defined root note (resolution point) which a song uses in order to come up with melodies and what not. Keys are defined simply by their tonics, which are triads that define the root and the quality of the key (major or minor). Keys, although they have definite key signatures, are much less strict in regards to note choice because all you have to do in a key is resolve to the tonic and confirm the quality of the key (which is very flexible). You can use whatever notes you want as long as they end up getting you to that end.

I could go on, but I'll leave it at that.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#19
i see your point..and thanks for those links..i never thought to look in the columns.

and music is personal... as life is personal..you just cant go places talkin smack about other peoples stuff whats wrong with you? thats rude

ONLY JOKING lol

i felt like your constructive criticism was more harm then good..im sure noone wants to discourage anyone saying things like that. ya know

iv just seen to many stupid arguements that the goal is missed..and that is to help.
and im sure we have all been discouraged over the smallest comments/remarks.

thats why i prefer to just post a link i used. when things like theory can be explained so many ways all options must be viewed.

all im saying is that "contructive criticism" does no good..unless your posting better info or something that helps.

i think the Crusade articles are very nicely arranged..like you mentioned not to long and may go into better depth in every aspect. which is very good for taking notes...to tape to your wall to look at 24/7.

another thing i didnt like about the one i posted was the interval diagram..every single one is there and its just to much...

some videos i like is
http://www.creativeguitarstudio.com/theory.php

he explains key sig and circle of fifths very well i think..

btw i think karma brought us this thread to teach us all very important lessons
#20
Quote by metalmetalhead
all im saying is that "contructive criticism" does no good..unless your posting better info or something that helps.
Well, I think pointing out inconsistencies and misinformation does help, as it points you away from sources which may mislead or teach bad habits. That's the thing about the internet; there's a lot of misinformation out there. When you're starting out, it's hard to tell what's good information and what isn't.

You do have a point in saying that coming in and debating these things can throw people off. I have a tendency to do that, but I feel that it's important that people learn what information is correct and what isn't. This goes double for modes.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea