#1
How could i record a demo while keeping a fairly low budget? How many songs should be included? What are record companies looking for in a demo?
#2
Check your area for a local studio that has cheap rates and some decent gear. Some even have packages where you can record 3 or 4 songs for cheap.

In a demo, 3 or 4 songs that show what your band sounds like.

Record companies are thieving bastards. They look at several things. First, can we profit off the band? Literally, thats what record companies are all about, making money for themselves. Second, is the band semi popular in places outside where they are? This helps for marketing. Finally, have they done anything notable? This is a huge variety of things but mainly have they done anything with people more famous than them.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#3
You should ask around because chances are you will know someone with like a home recording studio who will record you for like really cheap or maybe nothing at all. Or you could buy your own equipment, or you could find a local studio.

Include at least 3-4 songs. If you have more, then record them too. The more material you have, the more it'll appear like you are serious about your band and want to take it to the next level. However, don't fill up a demo with crap just to make it look good.

Yeah record companies just want profit.. even if you make it big, for every CD that is sold your band will only get about 10 cents from it and the record company gets the rest. They will also look to see that your music is something people will want to listen to. They also will want to know where you've played, who you've played with, stuff like that.
#4
I'd say your three strongest songs for a demo to send to a label.

HOWEVER, lots of labels will not accept unsolicited mail, so you are wasting your time if:

1. You don't have a large local following.
2. You have a following outside of your local area.
3. You don't have a lawyer/agent

This is, of course, for the major labels, and some of the larger independents. Which labels were you thinking of sending it too?
#5
Quote by mh.666
I'd say your three strongest songs for a demo to send to a label.

HOWEVER, lots of labels will not accept unsolicited mail, so you are wasting your time if:

1. You don't have a large local following.
2. You have a following outside of your local area.
3. You don't have a lawyer/agent

This is, of course, for the major labels, and some of the larger independents. Which labels were you thinking of sending it too?


maybe a small record company for starters. like prosthetic, or metal blade.
#6
Self-release digitally and self-promote using the internet. You can earn a hefty percentage of your music and still actually own the rights to it. Labels are disgusting thieving bastards. Sure, they pay for your studio time but they then only give you a very small percentage of sales.

I've learnt to record, mix and master in my own home with promising results.. I just need to write some dam music.
#7
I know Metal Blade accept unsolicited mail. How's your following locally? And as noted above, you probably are better self-releasing stuff, and letting the labels come to you. If labels don't come that isn't necessarily a bad thing, as YOU still own YOUR music, and have much more control.