#1
Basically, I'm trying to train our new bassist, because she has close to zero experience on bass. She has spent some time on guitar, but not much; however, she's willing to learn, and work hard on it, so I feel that this is worthwhile.

In one of our bands songs, the bassline behind the main riff (I wrote it, just like all of our basslines) follows this rhythm (Q=quarter note, E=eighth note, S=sixteenth note; there are no rests):

Q E S E S E E E


That rhythm just repeats, with the bass switching to a different note each measure. For some reason, she just can't get this rhythm down; I tried slowing it down, at at 86 BPM (it's normally at 115), she felt comfortable with it; however, even at 100, she was having problems.

I'm just wondering if anyone has any advice on how to get her more comfortable with that rhythm, and to allow her to play it easier.
#2
Quote by herby190
she


There's your problem.

But seriously, I have no idea how to teach a sense of rhythm to someone. I think it's more of an inherent ability.
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#4
Duuuum, Dum de Dum de Dum Dum Dum
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#5
If she can play it comfortably at 86 then get her to keep practicing at 86. Once it's perfect then she should be comfortable at 87, repeat until you get to 115.
#6
As you said: she is new at bass, it will take time to develop speed. Just tell her to practice with metronome, and make you a sandwich.
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#7
Quote by C0_0kie
As you said: she is new at bass, it will take time to develop speed. Just tell her to practice with metronome, and make you a sandwich.
It isn't the speed really; she can play the little sixteenth-eighth parts fine by themselves, it's just that as a whole, she has trouble with the rhythm where it goes off-beat.
#8
Quote by herby190
It isn't the speed really; she can play the little sixteenth-eighth parts fine by themselves, it's just that as a whole, she has trouble with the rhythm where it goes off-beat.

Use this device of torture.
#9
Quote by pwrmax
Use this device of torture.
I've just had her playing with a Guitar Pro track of it, and slowing the track down.
#10
Quote by C0_0kie
As you said: she is new at bass, it will take time to develop speed. Just tell her to practice with metronome, and make you a sandwich.

this sounds excellent, guitar pro should be fine also.

might I throw in, if there's 2 guitarists, double it up so she can follow you a little bit when you need to have her get it totally down? this has worked for me many times when I just can't get something I'd normally have down in a minute (you know those days).

in addition, might i suggest combining bell pepper with roast beef and cilantro sauce for the sandwich?
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#11
Quote by the humanity
in addition, might i suggest combining bell pepper with roast beef and cilantro sauce for the sandwich?


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Last edited by Nutter_101 at Jun 23, 2010,
#12
i had the same problem. i dont think you can actually teach a ryhtm. its somthing that comes natrually. you can teach the chick to like count it out maybe, but i tried that and the guy i was trying to teach still cant get it. you just have to feel the rhythm i guess. its hard to describe.
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#13
Quote by LicenseToPunk
i had the same problem. i dont think you can actually teach a ryhtm. its somthing that comes natrually. you can teach the chick to like count it out maybe, but i tried that and the guy i was trying to teach still cant get it. you just have to feel the rhythm i guess. its hard to describe.
She knows how to properly count a rhythm, this is just a bit of a tricky one to count....

Quote by the humanity
might I throw in, if there's 2 guitarists, double it up so she can follow you a little bit when you need to have her get it totally down? this has worked for me many times when I just can't get something I'd normally have down in a minute (you know those days).
I'm not sure I understand what you mean...

Quote by the humanity
in addition, might i suggest combining bell pepper with roast beef and cilantro sauce for the sandwich?
She's a vegetarian, and so am I.
Last edited by herby190 at Jun 23, 2010,
#14
Guitar Pro is ok, but turn on the metronome if you didn't already. It makes a big difference for feeling the beat.
#15
She'll get, it just takes practice. She may also just have problems with the phrasing. and I don't mean a technical problem just more of a creative difference. like Im sure w've all tried to learn a song where no matter how hard we try we always mess up in a spot becasue we want to go up a 4th instead of a 5th or something else just because it feels right. I dunno if that makes sense, but "I dig a pony" was a bitch for me to learn, not becasue it was particulary difficult, just becasue one litte part of it felt wrong.
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#16
Get her and the drummer aside and have them work together on it. I am assuming your drummer is competent.

Take it slow and have her cue in to what the drummer is doing not the guitarists, then slowly build up speed. I suspect you are having her lock into what the guitarists are doing, which will make it oh so more difficult for a beginning bassist.

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There's your problem.

But seriously, I have no idea how to teach a sense of rhythm to someone. I think it's more of an inherent ability.


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#17
Quote by anarkee
Get her and the drummer aside and have them work together on it. I am assuming your drummer is competent.

Take it slow and have her cue in to what the drummer is doing not the guitarists, then slowly build up speed. I suspect you are having her lock into what the guitarists are doing, which will make it oh so more difficult for a beginning bassist.
Well, I was actually having her play with just the bass, so the guitar wasn't really involved. However, I am the drummer, and seeing as I wrote both the drumbeat and bassline, they actually do lock pretty well, so I may have to try that; the snare goes offbeat at the same times as the bassline.
#18
Quote by the_perdestrian
She'll get, it just takes practice. She may also just have problems with the phrasing. and I don't mean a technical problem just more of a creative difference. like Im sure w've all tried to learn a song where no matter how hard we try we always mess up in a spot becasue we want to go up a 4th instead of a 5th or something else just because it feels right. I dunno if that makes sense, but "I dig a pony" was a bitch for me to learn, not becasue it was particulary difficult, just becasue one litte part of it felt wrong.
Likely this. It's not that you can't do it, it's just that you naturally want to do it another way.
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#19
Quote by herby190
I'm not sure I understand what you mean...

the guitarist plays the exact same part on his guitar while she plays it on the bass. just for a little practice. it really helps me here and there, it may help her.
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I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


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#20
Quote by the humanity
the guitarist plays the exact same part on his guitar while she plays it on the bass. just for a little practice. it really helps me here and there, it may help her.
Well, I played the rhythm for her on a guitar I had around, and she still seems to have trouble with it.... idk, I'm hoping she just works on it on her own time, and has better luck with it....
#21
Quote by herby190
Well, I was actually having her play with just the bass, so the guitar wasn't really involved. However, I am the drummer, and seeing as I wrote both the drumbeat and bassline, they actually do lock pretty well, so I may have to try that; the snare goes offbeat at the same times as the bassline.


It will give her an aural cue to start to lock to. Seriously, its the way my better half and I work through more complicated rhythms before bringing a guitarist.