#1
Ok sorry not sure if this belongs here or in Musicians Talk, but anyways the title pretty much says it all. What makes good lyrics, or even bad ones? What do you consider cliche? What makes the lyrics stand out? Do the actual words mean more than how they are sung? etc...
Looking forward to your guys' opinions
#2
Who is saying it and how creatively they are saying it. You can always tell when a musician is insincere.
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I do believe you just used Blink 182 and hard rock in the same sentence. It would seem you're rather confused.
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#3
There really isnt a visible definition on whats good and whats bad. beauty is in the eye of the beholder. its why people like some genres. there isnt one genre that is labeled bad (except for country). as for words vs how they are sung...how they are sung has an impact but i think its a half a half thing. they work together to make something great. though in an interview, the singer for Linkin Park says that he chooses his lyrics sometimes just because they sound good (thus comes Bleed it Out). as for cliche stuff. listen to about 50 love songs and youll find similar lyrics and metaphors. we're all guilty of using them now and then. just don't put ALOT together. just one here and maybe one there is fine...My final say is: the best lyrics are something unique. like i said earlier, nobody likes alot of cliches. find something new. maybe its a metaphor that nobody's ever thought of or singing something in a new way. make your music your own. Hope this helps and good luck comrade!
#4
Obviously there are a lot of factors that can make lyrics great or bad. Yes some songs have horrible cliche's as is used in many pop songs and hip hop. Take one of your favorite songs that's up beat and fun, and then just read the lyrics. A lot of times it may seem like jibberish, like a ramones song. Doesn't take away from the song, just not what you would call amazing either. As for how a song is sung, look at covers by different artists and see how their delivery changes it. A great example would be Whitney Houstons "I will always love you." The Dolly Parton one is just fine, but the way Whitney sang it drove the lyrics to a whole new level.

Cliche's are unavoidable for the most part, you'll get a great line and lo and behold, the only rhyme scheme is a fairly common word or phrase. Sure you can try to change it around but anything else will change the content of your previous line. These are times when I think it's ok to keep your cliche line in because changing anything else could ruin the integrity of the song and if the song as a whole works well, then it doesn't matter. Just about every songwriter uses them, especially love songs. As much as someone hates to use a cliche, it's almost a guilty pleasure when works just right.

Remember, some of the greatest songs written were in simplicity. And they say a true simple song is one of the hardest to write and as writers we want a grand masterpiece when all that is needed is something stripped down and real.