#1
Alright so I just finished the instrumental of a song I'm writing, and I've been working on the vocal melody, when I realized that the melody is at the very top of my range. Like if I tried to sing another half step higher than the highest note in the melody, I would not be able to hit it. The song is in A, by the way. I realized that if I transpose the song to D, I could still play the guitar riffs the same way, just on different strings, and the vocal melody would be in the upper middle part of my range, so it would be a lot easier to sing, not to mention my voice sounds better when I'm in the bottom or middle of my range than the top. But the thing is is that I like the way the guitar parts sound when they are in A than when they are in D.

So my question is, which would be the best thing to do? Keep the song in A with the guitar parts sounding best, but singing uncomfortably, or Transposing is to D, the guitar parts not sounding as good as they could, but the vocal melody being a lot more comfortable?
#2
You could use a capo to keep the fingerings and strings the same.

But guitar vs voice, make the voice sound better.
#3
you could harmonize the vocal melody differently, keep the guitar the same sing in that key just lower down in your vocal range untill comfortable. i havent heard the song but that may be an option.
#4
Find voicings of the chords that you like better which also support your vocal range.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#5
And to let you know what the verse riff sounds like, it goes like this (I also have piano playing low octaves and a bass playing the same thing):

It's in 4/4, but I didn't feel like putting in the rests. You should be able to figure it out.
---Q -Q --e e (e) -Q -e-Q -Q
e|-----------|---------------|
B|-----------|---------------|
G|-----------|---------------|
D|-----------|---------------|
A|-----------|---------------|
E|-5--5---3-5|(5)--5--0-3--4-|


I'm pretty sure those are the right note values. And the reason I have the dashes by the note values is because it won't let me space them out for some reason.

It does that 4 times, then does that on the A string twice, then back to the original twice, then it goes to an E7 chord for 2 measures, than a D7 chord for 1 and a half measures, and to finish off the rest of the measure is a short fill and it goes into the chorus, but it's the verse vocal melody that I'm worried about. I've come up with 4 or 5 melodies, but one of them sounds like Blue Orchid by the White Stripes, one of them sounds like Sunshine of Your Love by Cream, and the others just weren't that great, so the best one to use is the one I'm having trouble with.
Last edited by ItsOnlyGNR at Jun 24, 2010,
#6
Tune a half-step down. A lot of bands do this to accommodate for the singer's range.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
If you objectively heard your song in the key of D, you wouldn't be able to tell whether it was in A or D (excepting you singing higher or lower, and if you're straining to hit notes I imagine that doesn't sound too great but I don't know, maybe that is a desirable quality that you want for your music). So basically, I'd say transpose to D (or hell even G or F, those are lower than A and chances are you can sing them fine too). And as to you learning the song in D because you only have to change strings, I would encourage you to learn the notes on your instrument well enough that you can transpose reasonably well and learn how to transpose so you can transpose from any key to any key. Those are both great skills to have, especially if you're thinking of writing more music.
#8
Why don't you just change the key to G, and change the fingering of the guitar riffs?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
Quote by st.stephen
If you objectively heard your song in the key of D, you wouldn't be able to tell whether it was in A or D (excepting you singing higher or lower, and if you're straining to hit notes I imagine that doesn't sound too great but I don't know, maybe that is a desirable quality that you want for your music). So basically, I'd say transpose to D (or hell even G or F, those are lower than A and chances are you can sing them fine too). And as to you learning the song in D because you only have to change strings, I would encourage you to learn the notes on your instrument well enough that you can transpose reasonably well and learn how to transpose so you can transpose from any key to any key. Those are both great skills to have, especially if you're thinking of writing more music.


I've been playing piano for 11 years and guitar for 8. During music class in 6th, 7th, and 8th grade, instead of actually doing what everyone else did in class, my teacher just had me transpose music. I know how to transpose, trust me.

It's just that it's the riff in the chorus that concerns me. If I transpose to something other than D, the riff will become a lot harder to play than it needs to be. It would still be possible to play it, but it just makes it a lot easier when I have an open string (it's hard to explain without tabbing it out, but I don't feel like tabbing it out ). Although I could use a capo.

Alright well I'll try out all of your suggestions, thanks
#10
The lead instrument in any piece of music should of course be the most prominant.

In a vocal the voice is the lead instument so do what you have to to make it the best not second rate....

Fenderflyer