#1
My friend recently decided that he wants to try singing like Rob Halford in my band.

It is the "Painkiller voice"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WS6-vI70oc0

What can he do to learn to sing like this? I am trying to get him some help, since he asked for it. Could it involve natural talent?

Also, he obviously can't make it sound exactly like Halford's, but he wants to sing with a similar style.
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/notfunnyatalljoke.


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#2
not to discourage the guy but that's a tough ordeal
usually takes people years to get a good sound out of the very top part of their range but he has to learn how to use his head voice instead of falsetto and slowly add power to that register over time. lessons will REALLY help here, but he'd need to find someone who is experienced with metal vocals.
#3
Quote by Cheeseman07
not to discourage the guy but that's a tough ordeal
usually takes people years to get a good sound out of the very top part of their range but he has to learn how to use his head voice instead of falsetto and slowly add power to that register over time. lessons will REALLY help here, but he'd need to find someone who is experienced with metal vocals.

I'll suggest vocal lessons to him, but he is going to have to find a guy with metal experience by himself.
Quote by user_nameless
You can go ahead and sponge my bob.

/notfunnyatalljoke.


Quote by halo43
When you date a vegetarian, you're the only meat they'll ever eat.
#4
Not necessarily. Good technique is good technique. In most of Halford's stuff, particularly the higher notes, he has a very clean and open sound. That usually comes from good technique.

That said, a Les Paul will never sound like a Strat, and Ozzy Osbourne will never sound like Brian Johnson.... and unless your friend already sounds pretty much in that ballpark, he will never sound like Rob Halford.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
I've never liked the good technique is good technique thing, I mean sure once you've spent years and years fine-tuning your voice you'll be able to sing in any style as long as you've spent enough time on that vocal style, but if he finds someone who knows how to get that specific sound he'd get there a lot quicker.

I know from experience that some classical teachers will call you a bag of shit if you try to sing in any rock style even if it's with good tone for the genre and isn't hurting your voice.
#6
My instructor was a tenor with the Metropolitan Opera in New York and has performed at Carnegie Hall. He teaches a technique that has its roots in opera, but has taught many people from the pop music field.

Brian Vollmer of Helix: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d301tsqXZeI
Gil Moore of Triumph: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4qnhoxAEVX0
Ian Thomas (folk-pop): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oU0x858bNSA
Rita Chiarelli (blues): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EjBOxvMBUI
Lisa DalBello (80's pop): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7n-X9UyteM
Daniel Lanois (sings roots music, producer of U2's Joshua Tree) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3SUAk0pEFg
Beverly D'Angelo (actress "Vacation" co-star, Broadway singer) - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beverly_D'Angelo

Classical technique, but applied to a real range of music.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Your teacher was probably one of the few who really knew what they were talking about.

just saying that a mediocre teacher of any teaching style won't be as useful as someone who focuses specifically on the style you want.