#1
I've been trying (with relatively little success now that I reflect on it) for the past 14 months to teach myself guitar. In the past 14 months I've memorized the 1st position, some of the fretboard, and a few songs.

Considering I wouldn't mind doing this professionally (EG: Start a music store and offer lessons) and I'm 16 I think it's about time I just call it a good try, give in to the inevitable, and find myself an actual instructer so I can actually wrap my head around theory, scales, etc and just become a better player.

So here's where I need some help...how do I find a good teacher? I have no idea how much they cost on average, but I know it won't be cheap. And I want to make sure that I'm getting the most for my money.

So thanks for readng and your help,
Stephen
Have a good one,
Phoenix
#2
This is pretty much my exact situation.

My friend recommended a website called Jamplay if I can't find a local, but I haven't looked at it yet.
Quote by genghisgandhi
Your mom had a botched abortion, and you were the result.


Need a laugh?
Quote by MetaIronForce

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|__LOLOMETER__|

That deserved a lolmeter

#3
Read books. And internets. You can learn everything there is to know about music theory and guitar theory if you put in the time and effort to READ.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
Last edited by seemeel at Jun 24, 2010,
#4
If you want a good teacher you need one who can teach theory (staff music isn't a necessity).
Otherwise you'll be wasting your dollars to learn a new song each week, probably printed in tab -_-.

Best thing to do would be to talk to musicians in your area and see who they know, or if there's a music 'school' or shop that gives lessons just ask them about their teachers or lesson plans.

Don't be afraid to ask questions relevant to your goals, or push the point when you don't understand, otherwise you'll be put on the same level as any douche wanting to bust out SOTW with their l33t tab reading skillz.

Remember you're paying them.
lol guitar
#5
Hey man, SOTW has a catchy riff. A good party riff. Not as awesome as the million dollar riff of course. By which I mean Back in Black.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#7
As Koslack said, the best teacher is the one that works for you. This isn't just relevant to guitar lessons, but to all teachers. You'll find in school and university you'll do better at a course if you really like the teacher.

Guitar teachers (or any music teacher for that matter) cost $25-$30 per half hour ($AUS). Now you may think this is a little steep, but one problem is that you say you want to become a "professional". Now being a "professional" usually requires a couple of things, and in the future this may include a music degree. If you want a music degree I think it would be highly advisable to start getting those private lessons right away if you want to enter Uni when you finish school.

Otherwise, the internet is a good resource, we have many different lessons here on UG. You have to make sure that you start from the start however, no matter how awesome you think you are.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#8
Also do music at school (which you probably already are if you are pursuing a musical career).
Ask the music teacher about parts of theory that interest you, read a lot of books, talk to other musicians and use the facilities.

You may not like school now, but the resources are FREE!!
lol guitar
#9
Quote by Phoenix Reborn
and a few songs.
Here's your problem. You could be a theory guru and still not be a musician. How, you ask? Theory doesn't make music. Music makes theory. What I mean by this is theory is the study of music. Music isn't the study of theory. Now, knowing theory helps you, as it helps you articulate your ideas (a lot), but it seems your lacking the part of just playing music. Play music, and don't stop playing music. That's what music is all about, am I right? I didn't start learning theory until probably about a year (maybe less, I don't know) into my playing, because I simply needed a musical base.

Your second sentence should read (in my opinion), "In the past 14 months I've learned a bunch of songs and feel strongly about my ability to play and now I'd like to learn some theory."

I almost can't believe I'm steering someone away from learning theory, but it seems to me like you just need more practice on your instrument first. I myself spent at least a year just learning songs in my basement. I played all the time, and developed a lot of essential skills. Once learning songs started to not be quite enough, then I ventured into theory. I believe this stuff happens in stages, you can't just jam it all in at one time.

Now bear in mind, this is all opinion based on what worked for me.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
Quote by Phoenix Reborn
I've been trying (with relatively little success now that I reflect on it) for the past 14 months to teach myself guitar. In the past 14 months I've memorized the 1st position, some of the fretboard, and a few songs.

Considering I wouldn't mind doing this professionally (EG: Start a music store and offer lessons) and I'm 16 I think it's about time I just call it a good try, give in to the inevitable, and find myself an actual instructer so I can actually wrap my head around theory, scales, etc and just become a better player.

So here's where I need some help...how do I find a good teacher? I have no idea how much they cost on average, but I know it won't be cheap. And I want to make sure that I'm getting the most for my money.

So thanks for readng and your help,
Stephen


Define what it is you feel is the most meaningful to you, and say over the next six months how would you answer this question?

"If I paid and could learn ____________________________ over the next 6 months, then I would really feel like this was money well spent and would be happy with my 6 months worth of progress"

That said, may I tell you the best teacher will inspire you and show you how to get there, but you have to do it. The difference between a student that does well and one that flounders is their own commitment to time and discipline towards learning the material, between lessons.

Best,

Sean
#11
Sean0913 will give you theory lessons online for a reasonable price i hear.

btw its extremely redundent to "sign" the end of every post you make when your username is also your name.

just saying
Last edited by Coagulation at Jun 25, 2010,
#12
To find a teacher:

Go to your local Guitar Center. Look at the bulletin board. There is one for teachers in every store.

Pick a teacher with lots of experience with both teaching and playing professionally. If you're in Connecticut, I saw an ad for a teacher with 20 years of experience playing professionally as well as over 1,000 lessons taught (or something like that). That'd be the guy I'd go to if I wasn't broke.

Anyways, if money is an issue, there is still a way - the internet. I am not going to advise you to steal books on theory, but hey man, what you do is your business. Just remember Rome wasn't built in a day and don't get discouraged. Theory isn't that hard to learn once you've got the books in front of you.
#13
To answer your question Sean...if i could learn scales, beter my soloing techniques and some improv techniques in 6 months that'd be money spent great in my opinion.

I agree Theory can be learned from learning songs. But some 'official' theory lessons wouldn't hurt either in my opinion.

And thanks for all the responses so far guys, you've given me a lot to chew on while I earn money for an instructer. More advice would be welcome

Thanks again,
Stephen
Have a good one,
Phoenix
#14
Quote by Phoenix Reborn
To answer your question Sean...if i could learn scales, beter my soloing techniques and some improv techniques in 6 months that'd be money spent great in my opinion.

I agree Theory can be learned from learning songs. But some 'official' theory lessons wouldn't hurt either in my opinion.

And thanks for all the responses so far guys, you've given me a lot to chew on while I earn money for an instructer. More advice would be welcome

Thanks again,
Stephen

An instructor will likely help you progress, but you'll still have to put in time and effort on your own. Until you can afford an instructor, the internet is a very good resource. If you don't know where to start, this forum is a good place...
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.