#1
Short-and-sweet; certain artists, quickest off the top of my head being Joe Bonamassa, Jeff Beck, and Neil Young, half of my friends will say are blues guitarists. Then the other half will come around and say they're bluesy rock guitarists.

Considering that most rock in the end is a derivative of the blues, and noawadays most people who prototyped the modern concept of rock outside of the American prototypes of the genre who mixed it with swing, country and Jazz for things like rockabilly and such generally define their musical aspirations as "Hyped-up blues", I figure it's a fine line, but where exactly is it generally thought of to be where someone goes from a bluesman to a rocker? Not trying to drag on either term, just a matter of curiosity.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 73-78
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 2-0
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 24-7
Last edited by necrosis1193 at Jun 25, 2010,
#2
well those guys are bluesy rock. pure blues i think has a specific feel to it, I can't really describe it but its just a different rhythm and feel vs blues rock.
---▲===
Pink Floyd
#3
Firstly Neil Young is by no means a blues guitarist. But i think what defines a blues guitarist is if their songs are basically in a twelve bar blues format.
SMILE!
#4
Quote by Grimpenguin
well those guys are bluesy rock. pure blues i think has a specific feel to it, I can't really describe it but its just a different rhythm and feel vs blues rock.


True enough, but sometimes it can get hard with modern artists to tell the two apart in some cases.

Quote by Mr.DeadDuck
Firstly Neil Young is by no means a blues guitarist. But i think what defines a blues guitarist is if their songs are basically in a twelve bar blues format.


To the first point; Exactly. There are guys like Bonamassa, Beck, Clapton, who I would call blues guitarists with large portions of rock either by influence or style, but then there are guys like Neil Young, and, expanding the point, Joe Perry, and Jimmy Page who, while I can hear blues in easily, are very much rock artists in my opinion that some of them call blues guitarists, which is why I'm not sure whether or not it's my definitions that are weird or not.

To the second; While I do see where you're coming from, that's a bit stale, isn't it? Even the guys that everyone uses as the men who define bluesman stereotypes(Guys like Muddy Waters, Robert Johnson, B.B. King, Buddy Guy, the more successful of the old blues guitarist/singers from the 1930's-50's who pretty much define what people who aren't big into blues see all blues as) use more than a 12-bar progression for music.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 73-78
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 2-0
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 24-7
#5
yeah, i think it's sometimes too difficult, blues and rock aren't even really separate genres in my book, just a logical extension of one another, much the same as rock and hard rock, and hard rock and metal, and so forth.

like, Joe Bonamassa covered Zeppelin's Tea for One on the You and Me album, and he is more or less considered either blues-rock or blues, whereas Zep is usually called rock and in some circles (quite wrongly) metal.... in any case genres just really aren't important, call Phil Sayce techno, Bonamassa dub step, the black keys avant garde, or Radio Moscow reggae and I'd still love them all the same
Last.Fm

“If there was anything that depressed him more than his own cynicism, it was that quite often it still wasn't as cynical as real life.”
― Terry Pratchett

qft...



Jeremy Clarkson is a knob.
#6
I think in these on the edge cases a lot of it goes by how the artist chooses to portray themselves. For instance, look at SRV and Bonamassa, they both easily could be considered rock musicians if they chose to market themselves as such. However, they often chose to cover blues standards, they call(ed) themselves blues musicians and cited their influences as such. An oversimplification, I know, but I think it contributes at least a bit.

Quote by wilty00
Aren't you kind of scared walking around in the dark with a carniverous loon on the loose?
#7
Led Zeppelin played a lot of blues standards too


but I agree with the other part, it really just comes down to how an artist self identifies
Last.Fm

“If there was anything that depressed him more than his own cynicism, it was that quite often it still wasn't as cynical as real life.”
― Terry Pratchett

qft...



Jeremy Clarkson is a knob.