#1
Searched "backward chord progression" nothing turned up.

I had shown my friend some cool licks and riffs to use. Then he asked me to show him some backward chord progression. I really didn't know how to answer that one. What I have always done was just drop in a dominant7 or the diminished7. Example: G7-C or Bdim7-Am-Em-Gdom7-C.

How would I show my friend some descending chord progressions?
#3
Hotel California
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#4
LOL I have no idea what I am saying either. Hey! It was my friend who said "backward chord moves" and I find myself wondering too. I suppose my friend was wondering about something like this: Gdom7-Fmaj-Emin-Amaj. What are your ideas of descending chord progressions?
#5
||: Dmaj7 | Db7 | Cmaj7 | B7 | Bbmaj7 | A7 :||

You can keep going down the sequence if you want, but that A7 resolves you back to the beginning (Dmaj7) perfectly to start over again.

Usually "backwards" mean back pedaling through the circle of 5th's so how, or moving through the circle of 4th's, however you want to look at it. Like this...

You can modulate down IIm-V-I's:

like this

||: Fm | Bb7 | Ebmaj7 | Ebmaj7 | Abm7 | Db7 | F#maj7 | F#maj7 | Bm7 | E7 | Amaj7 | Amaj7 | Dm7 | G7 | Cmaj7| Cmaj7 | Bbm7 | Eb7 | Abmaj7 | Abmaj7 | Dbm7 | F#7 | Bmaj7 | Bmaj7 | Em7 | A7 | Dmaj7 | Dmaj7 | Dm7 | G7 | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 :||

or like this

||: Fm | Bb7 | Ebmaj7 | Ebmaj7 | Ebm7 | Ab7 | Dbmaj7 | Dbmaj7 | Dbm7 | F#7 | Bmaj7 | Bmaj7 | Bm7 | E7 | Amaj7| Amaj7 | Am7 | D7 | Gmaj7 | Gmaj7 | Gm7 | C7 | Fmaj7 | Fmaj7 :||

Those last two examples keep you moving down until you're at the beginning again.
Last edited by MikeDodge at Jun 25, 2010,
#6
Quote by spiderjump
What are your ideas of descending chord progressions?
Descending and ascending harmonic motion both seem equally important to me.

I'm actually not exactly sure what your friend is talking about. There's really no such thing as "descending or ascending chord progressions." You might have upward or downward harmonic motion, but you don't really classify chord progressions that way, as it's kind of pointless. You don't just say "I like descending chord progressions." In working with voice leading you might say "I want that note to move down to that note" or "I should have the bass notes move downward in these measures," but that's a bit more specific than "I want a descending chord progression."
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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#7
Mike Dodge, that was exactly what I was thinking when my friend asked me about backwards chord progression. That was what confused me about his question.

Food1010, speaking from the point of view of voiceleading, I think I should be saying "a descending chord progression with a walking bassline". Correct me if I am wrong. I agree with you that ascending and descending are equally important. Voiceleading IMO is more fun to analyze.
#8
Quote by spiderjump
Food1010, speaking from the point of view of voiceleading, I think I should be saying "a descending chord progression with a walking bassline". Correct me if I am wrong. I agree with you that ascending and descending are equally important. Voiceleading IMO is more fun to analyze.
So do you mean a progression like this:

A E B E

...with a bass line that walks down like this using chord tones other than the root:

A G# F# E

...or are you thinking more like this:

A G#m F#m E

...with the bass playing the root notes?
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#9
There's also the common pop progression (tons of Elton John, Whiter Shade of Pale, Changes, Babe I'm Gonna Leave You, All The Young Dudes, etc...) where it you get a root movement the descends like:

C-C/B-Am-Am/G-F-Em-D(or Dm) then start over again.

SO you have the root movement of C, B, A, G, F, E, D, C
#10
Turn Soonest to the Sea by Protest the Hero has a decending powerchord progression. You can hear it right when the vocals start.
#11
Either way as long as the E at the end of each example is a dominant. The first example would use chord inversions while the second example would use straight chords.
#12
"Backward Chord Progression" might be referring to a chord change that is classified as a Regression as opposed to a Progression. Progressions propel the music forward while Regressions provide a pull back. -maybe.
Si