#1
I'm still very new to the guitar, about 5 months in. I've been watching alot of videos and checking out threads all over the forum and taking advantage of free lessons on the web where people have been generous enough to help with their time and knowledge.

So today I'm drawing a map of the fretboard because I'm able to now, but need help cementing note locations into my head so I just know what note is where without having to think on it for a few seconds.

I'm looking at my drawing and notice that all of the open strings are part of the C major scale. So key of C. I've heard people say Capo the second fret and now it's in the key of D. Now I know that is because those notes would be part of the D major Scale.

Next I figured out what intervals the strings were. and I think I finally figured out why someone threw that wrench in there and offset the B string a half step.
If you were to move it up so B String matches 5th Fret on the G string, then you would have to move up the E string half a step too. I think this would put a 4th(dissonant ) in a lot of open and barre chords. Which in general doesn't sound as good from what I understand.


Just thought I would share one of those "cool, now I'm starting to catch on" moments.
#2
actually all those notes on the open strings are also in D

but that next part, yea thats right
#3
yeah dude!! Way to go lol
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#4
catching on moments are awesome...and they get better as you go - keep at it

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#5
im 5 years in and you kinda lost me in there for a moment lol. congrats man keep going
#6
Good on ya mate. I sometimes use octaves to figure out where a note is. For example if I want to know what note is on the D string on the 8th fret, I know that it's the same as the 6th fret on the low E string (A#). Just a tip.