#1
I notice at a lot of shows, especially metal gigs when the guitar player goes to do a lead a lot of times it is barley audible.

I use a strat and play with moderate distortion but not to the degree of your average metalhead. I imagine by just using less distortion my guitar will cut through a little clearer. I am looking for clarity and not necessarily more volume. I'm thinking a treble booster might help but I have no idea what else I should look at.
Barf

Fender 70's reissue strat
Laney 120 mxd
Morley bad horsie 2
#2
an eq pedal. Volume pedal, signal booster all provide ways of cutting through. If you want the same tone more volume a clean boost is the way to go. If you are trying to cut through via eqing its all about the midrange!
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#3
Alot of metal guitarists seem to cut their mids, this results in not being able to cut through in a live situation.

Boosting your mids will help, as will backing off the gain a little.

Also it could just be something simple like the amp wasn't turned up enough, or wasn't miced properly if at all.

Treble boosting wont necessarily make you cut through any better.
"In modern music, a lot of people are really stuck on the example, asif it were the idea. It takes millions of examples to articulate an idea, so don't get stuck on the f*cking example." - Joshua Homme, 2008.
#5
It's all about the mids. Treble won't help much, unless you don't have a drummer, which I doubt.
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#6
Quote by nightraven
what kind of amp do you have and how is your EQ set?

Right now I play through a solid state laney, but I plan on financing a tube marshall head or laney head. I set my eq to bass 6 mids 4 and treble 10, I don't use much distortion, just enough to give a power chord "power"
Barf

Fender 70's reissue strat
Laney 120 mxd
Morley bad horsie 2
#7
Quote by bingeandletgo
It's all about the mids. Treble won't help much, unless you don't have a drummer, which I doubt.


Yeah, but why would you want to cut through the mix if you don't have a drummer
And trebles do help cut through the mix as much as mids, especially for leads
#8
Quote by ChucklesMginty
Is it an HSS strat? I'd imagine it's really hard to get a thick metal tone with single coils.

Otherwise, EQ Pedal. DON'T scoop your mids. That's normally why metal players disappear with a bassist and drummer. It can be done, but it's difficult. A tubescreamer will give you a mid-boost, but will take away some bass.

I have a sss setup, but I don't play typical metal. Is there a way to not boost my mids and cut through the mix though? I don't like the sound of mids up.
Barf

Fender 70's reissue strat
Laney 120 mxd
Morley bad horsie 2
#9
eh, after some quick research from various resources it seems that I am going to have to learn to love the mids. Thanks everyone's advice.
Barf

Fender 70's reissue strat
Laney 120 mxd
Morley bad horsie 2
#11
It's fine to turn your mids down when you're practicing alone, but when you're playing with a band, turn them up, to cut through.
"In modern music, a lot of people are really stuck on the example, asif it were the idea. It takes millions of examples to articulate an idea, so don't get stuck on the f*cking example." - Joshua Homme, 2008.
#12
Mids, man. Don't care what gear you have, you gotta get your mids in there. Boost and overdrive pedals are also very helpful.
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#13
Quote by ChucklesMginty
And think about switching to a humbucking guitar as soon as you can (or modding a humbucker into the bridge if you think it's worth it.) Strats are meant to sound thin and twangy, which sounds like crap in the context of metal.

Then again, if you switch to something like a Seymour Duncan Hotrail you could probably pull it off.

I really love the single coil sound though, On the seymour duncan website there are true single coil pickups that are over wound and in the description they list metal and heavier styles for use with this pickup. Has anyone had any experience with these "ssl4" pickups.
Barf

Fender 70's reissue strat
Laney 120 mxd
Morley bad horsie 2
#15
Quote by forsaknazrael
Are you using hum canceling singles? That's not the "single coil sound", IMO.

I use all positions. And the out of phase sounds are totally the true fender single coil sound. Also Final Fantasy rules.
Barf

Fender 70's reissue strat
Laney 120 mxd
Morley bad horsie 2