#1
I know this might not be on the right thread, but how would I go about remembering every note on the guitar. do i just keep staring at a picture of the notes until I memorize it or something else?
#2
Memorize the names of strings (assuming you're in standard tuning, or adjust accordingly) and then follow the alphabet, chromatically, up the neck.
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#3
You should have a tool to find the notes. Maybe try memorizing where all the natural notes are, or just a few reference points.

The way I learned was just counting up from the open string/12th fret or down from the twelfth fret. If you know your musical alphabet this should be no problem. It might be a while until you can name a note immediately, but you'll get there.
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#4
Learn the names of the strings. Learn the names of the notes where there are fret markers
then learn the notes in between. Do this up to the 12th fret. the notes just start over after the 12th fret.

in other words 12th fret notes are the same as open string notes.

Its a never ending pattern.
#5
I did it by learning the strings, then their octaves, and all of the possible places they could be. Then I built the rest in.
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#6
Learning scales and learning how chords are formed helps a lot too. You can kind of figure out how the notes are actually put down on the fretboard then. I'm just starting to learn everything in depth, but this guide has helped me ENORMOUSLY.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?value=The+Ultimate+Guide+To+Guitar&search_type=columns

This writer knows his stuff and can write in a very easy to read manner.
#7
One thing I realized was that it is easiest if you start by memorizing the notes up each string like everybody does for the E and A form barre chords (a.k.a. barre chords with roots on the E strings or A string, respectively)

Once you know them pretty cold that way, try Joe Satriani's method: set a metronome to 60 and pick a note. On each click, locate that note twice (if you can) on each string, then move to a new one. Joe recommends doing this exercise until you can do it at 100 BPM without missing a note.
#8
Quote by STONESHAKER
One thing I realized was that it is easiest if you start by memorizing the notes up each string like everybody does for the E and A form barre chords (a.k.a. barre chords with roots on the E strings or A string, respectively)

Once you know them pretty cold that way, try Joe Satriani's method: set a metronome to 60 and pick a note. On each click, locate that note twice (if you can) on each string, then move to a new one. Joe recommends doing this exercise until you can do it at 100 BPM without missing a note.


This sounds like fun! I may have to try that out
#9
There is some pretty decent software called Fretpro out there thats free, which got my foot in the door to memorizing the fretboard.

Above all though, I benefited from a year in Jazz Band. Learn chord shapes, and get some lead sheets, and just play, by finding the root of the chord. Play the songs in different places, shapes with roots on every string, etc.

Also, learning octaves across the guitar is very beneficial. Just knowing how many frets away and how many strings away the closest octave is and stuff is also very helpful.
#10
I learned the notes of the 3rd, 5th, and 7th frets and then just expanded once I had those down since it's pretty easy.
I've found it to be kind of fun to come up with the scales myself. I downloaded tux guitar and used the fret board toolbar thing since at the time my notes were still not memorized too well. Once you know what a whole step and half step is it's pretty easy. It's really helped me get a better grasp of where notes are.
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#11
^ this, plus print a diagram of the fretboard from google and keep it within arms reach, should make it easy to memorise
#12
I agree with Steven Pollick.
Know your guitar strings and follow the chromatic scale.

For example:

E String

Open E = E
1st fret = F
2nd fret = F#/Gb
3rd fret = G
4th fret = G#/Ab

A String:

Open A = A
1st fret = A#/Bb

And so on...