#1
I recently figured out how to sweep pick, and by that I mean I got my sweep picking up to speed and consistent. Basically though I just learned about 7 to 8 arpeggios that I can sweep with. When I play my own music though, I haven't been able to incorporate any of these to where it would sound good. I don't really know too much theory, but how would I figure out what arpeggios would sound good in like the phrygian and lydian modes? I know the arpeggios are just the notes in the chords, but if you're playing over power chords how would I know what arpeggio to play for that chord and would it change depending on the mode I'm playing in?

Also does anyone have any tips for sweep picking when your moving from one string to another, but staying on the same fret? I've been baring it, but it doesn't sound near as clean when I do that.

Sorry if this is confusing, and thanks in advance for any help.

Gaze long into the abyss, and the abyss gazes into you.
Friedrich Nietzsche
#2
Just look at the root notes of the arpeggiated chord, and place those root notes into whichever scale you would like. Or that's kinda what I do.
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#3
Forget about modes, modes don't exist to you since you said you don't know any theory (which shows). Learn the major scale and how to harmonize it and you'll learn what arpeggios fit where.
#4
Use chord substitution. I'll show you how it works.

First, take a chord progression - we'll say Cmaj7 - Fmaj7 - Gdom7, a basic 1-4-5 progression in the key of C major.

Now, let's look at the C major 7th. The formula for this chord is 1-3-5-7. So, that gives us C-E-G-B.

Now, let's look at C major's 3 chord: the E minor 7th. The formula for a minor 7th is 1-b3-5-b7. That gives us E-G-B-D.

Let's compare the 1 chord (Cmaj7) with the 3 chord (Emin7). C-E-G-B and E-G-B-D. The two notes that don't work are the 1 chord's C and the 3 chords's D. However, if we shorten the 3 chord to a minor triad, there are no clashing notes.

Try playing an E minor triad arpeggio over the Cmaj7 and see how it sounds. Cool right?

Memorize this and know that for any chord in this list, you may substitute the chord immediately to the left or right of it in its triad or seventh form. Play around with it. I think you'll find it's pretty easy to remember... it's basically just counting up the degrees of a chord to the 13th, except that you are looking at the compound intervals (the ones past the octave) as the simple interval... only an octave up.

1 (maj7th) - 3 (min7th) - 5 (dom7th) - 7 (dim7th) - 2 (min7th) - 4 (maj7th) - 6 (min7th) and repeat.

Besides using this for arpeggios, you can use it for chord substitutions and modes too.
Last edited by STONESHAKER at Jun 25, 2010,
#5
Quote by Ascendant
Forget about modes, modes don't exist to you since you said you don't know any theory (which shows). Learn the major scale and how to harmonize it and you'll learn what arpeggios fit where.



I know the the phrygian and lydian modes completely and can pretty much play them in any key anywhere on the neck. I don't know "much" theory, but I know those really well and thats pretty much what I always play in (the pentatonic too of course) with a few added notes here and there.

Thanks stoneshaker, that helped a lot. I'm starting to get a little better grasp of it all.

Gaze long into the abyss, and the abyss gazes into you.
Friedrich Nietzsche
#6
Quote by RIotdenied58
I know the the phrygian and lydian modes completely and can pretty much play them in any key anywhere on the neck. I don't know "much" theory, but I know those really well and thats pretty much what I always play in (the pentatonic too of course) with a few added notes here and there.

Thanks stoneshaker, that helped a lot. I'm starting to get a little better grasp of it all.


Can you harmonize chords from those modes?
#7
Quote by aCloudConnected
Can you harmonize chords from those modes?


I didn't a few days ago, but thats what I've been figuring out. thanks.

Gaze long into the abyss, and the abyss gazes into you.
Friedrich Nietzsche
#8
Quote by RIotdenied58
I didn't a few days ago, but thats what I've been figuring out. thanks.


I strongly suggest starting with the major scale. I think the majority of the people here will agree with me. If you have a good enough understanding of the major scale, modes will make sense fairly quickly. Learn what kind of chord is built off of each degree of the scale, learn how to stack thirds(or any interval for that matter), learn how to harmonize melodies in different intervals, learn how to add extensions to chords. All of it comes from the major scale.
#9
Yeah I'll definitely have to work a little to get all of this down, but for now I've been messing around with triads in the phrygian and have been coming up with some cool three and four string sweep exercises, that actually fit with with the chords I'm playing. I appreciate the help.

Gaze long into the abyss, and the abyss gazes into you.
Friedrich Nietzsche