#1
me and another guitarist are starting a band and we've found a drummer and bass player that we're interested in auditioning. we're just wondering the best way to do it because we've got nowhere convenient to practice.

the only place we can really use is a run-down studio place miles away that charges extortionate rates. we can't really afford to spend a lot of time there since we're both still at school and college, don't drive, and don't have jobs so one hour per week is pretty much our limit (at most).

so first problem is arranging the audition so we're not wasting outrageous amounts of time and money. would auditioning the bass player and the drummer both at the same time actually work? we've never met either of them, they don't know our songs (they might not like our songs) and there's a chance that neither of them would be 'right' for the band. we don't want it to be awkward.
doing one first then the other would be way more time consuming and expensive, but if it would work better, would it be better to play with the drummer by ourselves first, or the bass player first?


second problem is once we have a drummer and a bass player, this crappy expensive studio will once again be our only option for rehearsal. I'm just concerned about the cost and hassle of travelling, and if it would be worth it - I can't imagine getting anything at all done if we only play together once a week for a hour. so my second question is, does anyone have any ideas/tips for finding an easy convenient place to rehearse with the band or any decent workarounds so that we can play together like all the time?
thanks!
#3
Wow you're in a hard place there, especially with the lack of transport. Quite often it's possible to practice at the drummer's house, as they have a sound-proofed area and such. But if you can't drive, what happens when it comes time to gig? Are you sure there's only one practice room nearby?

Sometimes non-traditional places are rented out as practice rooms - where I live there's a renovated garage that I like to use, you can also practice in a room of an open bar, with people still drinking there and stuff, and there's also a spare room of a steelworks factory that's also rented out - you carry your amps and guitars past circular saws and stuff on the way to the room. Guess that's real METAL :P

Edit: It's worth auditioning them both at the same time - they have to work together, and it cuts down on time.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#4
Go to the studio and audition the drummer and bassist at the same time.

Remember that they are going to have to play with one another at some point, and an audition with one another is the best place to find this information out.

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#5
thanks everyone. I dont think the drummers house is an option and I cant think of anywhere else to do it. I'll look around for garages and storage spaces though
cheers
#6
Quote by AlanHB
Wow you're in a hard place there, especially with the lack of transport. Quite often it's possible to practice at the drummer's house, as they have a sound-proofed area and such. But if you can't drive, what happens when it comes time to gig? Are you sure there's only one practice room nearby?

Sometimes non-traditional places are rented out as practice rooms - where I live there's a renovated garage that I like to use, you can also practice in a room of an open bar, with people still drinking there and stuff, and there's also a spare room of a steelworks factory that's also rented out - you carry your amps and guitars past circular saws and stuff on the way to the room. Guess that's real METAL :P

Edit: It's worth auditioning them both at the same time - they have to work together, and it cuts down on time.



I gotta respectfuly disagree with you on auditioning both at the same time. You're trying to teach guys some material, which is hard enough when it's just one of them. But teaching two guys means twice the mistakes, so you're going to be hard pressed to get a good rhythm going.
Then there's the fact that if one of them fits and one of them doesn't, you might not even know it. One could be throwing the other off, preventing him from playing his best due to too many mistakes. Also, if one is a disruptive personality, it could hamper the other guy or make him think twice about joining the group. Always, always audition one guy at a time - that way you can give him the attention he needs to make him feel part of the group, and can really focus on his strengths and weaknesses.
#7
Quote by osXtiger
Go to the studio and audition the drummer and bassist at the same time.

Remember that they are going to have to play with one another at some point, and an audition with one another is the best place to find this information out.


This, but I really recommend a non-rehearsal situation first.

Get to know the guys (separately, or together) and talk about music. It's much better to have guys on the same page as you, rather than trying to teach two random guys your own stuff!

You really want all band members into the same stuff and with similar ideas of what the band wants to be- that's much better than guys who are just playing because they want to be in a band or w/e

You should be able to tell this way before they even play a note!
#8
Quote by koslack
I gotta respectfuly disagree with you on auditioning both at the same time. You're trying to teach guys some material, which is hard enough when it's just one of them. But teaching two guys means twice the mistakes, so you're going to be hard pressed to get a good rhythm going.


That's a good point, I think it may be more relevant to original bands than cover bands though, due to familiarity with the material. It is the optimum situation to audition both however.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
how about investing in a drum pad? our drummer has one and its great for quiet practices at his house where we can perfect the songs probably don't cost much and in the long run it'd be cheaper
practice studios are overrated for writing new material as its often too loud too notice little nuances of the song
i'd try auditioning at the same time but give them some material to practice beforehand eg a cover song or a rough recording of one of your songs for them to write there parts over
#10
About auditioning them at the same time....

Can you do this? Make a demo of your songs - even if it is just with a drum machine. Borrow a bass and lay down your guitars and vocals. Use Audacity or Reaper and your stock sound card and a borrowed SM57. It will sound crap, but it will get the idea across.

The point here is that you no longer have to teach them the songs. They can learn them themselves. Tell them that they can make the parts their own; that what is there on the demo is only to hold the song together and is not intended to be the final version of the parts.

Then you can have them audition together and they will both know the song. If they (or even one of them) don't/doesn't, then you know who you might and will not call back.

A few 'creative' places I know bands have practiced:
-self-storage garage-type units
-church basement hall (members of parish and got permission from priest)
-banquet hall (dad was one of the managers)
-school gym (teacher was willing to check in on them from time to time)
-school music room (same as above)
-vacant house (power leeched from neighbours' via outdoor extension cord and a couple of power-bars)
-store (aunt owned it, store and neighbouring stores closed at 8:00 and band practiced 9-11

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#11
thanks everyone good ideas :P I'll definitely look into storage rooms or other places to practice and yeah I reckon auditioning at the same time might be the way to go
cheers