#1
Hey everyone, I'm learning a song for a talent show and I know that it's in the key of B major. Can you give me any methods to learning the B major scale well? Anything will help.
#2
All the scales are pretty much the same, just moved up and down the fretboard.

Take this pattern:

e - |X|-|X|-|X|
B - |-|-|X|-|X|
G - |-|X|X|-|X|
D - |-|X|X|-|X|
A - |X|-|X|-|X|
E - |X|-|X|-|X|

And start with the bold X on B, and you have the B Maj scale!

If you have any other questions, or don't know how to read the pattern I posted, just ask.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#4
Sure

Here's the tabs starting from B:

e-----------------------------------------------7-9-11---
B----------------------------------------9-11-------------
G-------------------------------8-9-11-------------------
D----------------------8-9-11----------------------------
A-------------7-9-11-------------------------------------
E ---7-9-11-----------------------------------------------
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#6
The tabs I just gave you have the root note on B, but yes, you get the idea.

E---7- is the root note, and it's already on B, but if you ever need to play another major scale, just move that to the note to wherever the root note needs to be, and play the pattern from there.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#8
that's all well and good, but if you want to learn the B major scale well, then the notes are B C# D# E F# G# A# B. that pattern will work, but it's not going to get you as far as simply knowing the notes.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#9
How to learn a scale inside out?

Practice with it
Improvise with it
Write with it
Analyse songs that use it
Practice with it
Improvise with it
Write with it
Analyse songs that use it
#10
Quote by AeolianWolf
that's all well and good, but if you want to learn the B major scale well, then the notes are B C# D# E F# G# A# B. that pattern will work, but it's not going to get you as far as simply knowing the notes.


I completely agree, if you learn notes, and then how to make scales, it will make stuff like this so much easier.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#11
Quote by sites.nick
I completely agree, if you learn notes, and then how to make scales, it will make stuff like this so much easier.
This. Although I'm not sure if TS has enough time to learn it this way.

How much time do you have before this talent show?
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#12
Quote by sites.nick

e-----------------------------------------------7-9-11---
B----------------------------------------9-11-------------
G-------------------------------8-9-11-------------------
D----------------------8-9-11----------------------------
A-------------7-9-11-------------------------------------
E ---7-9-11-----------------------------------------------

Eww. That looks gross. Why don't you do this:

e---7-6-4-----------------------------------------------
B-----------7-5-4---------------------------------------
G-------------------6-4-3-------------------------------
D---------------------------6-4--------------------------
A--------------------------------7-6-4-------------------
E ---------------------------------------7-6-4-----------

The bolded numbers are B notes.
Last edited by MousseMoose at Jun 27, 2010,
#13
Because he wanted a simple depiction of the B major scale?

Something you have managed to completely avoid providing...
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#14
hey i got something you might want to think about.... want a nice change in melody but still be in the same key B major... Play the G# minor scale.. its B majors relative minor (6 interval or letter in the scale) it has all the same notes as B major but its tonic or root note is different to give a a minor feel ... for a second then you can go back to B major like nothing happend and lets you feel like you know what your doing.. good for solos
#15
Quote by elihu4321
hey i got something you might want to think about.... want a nice change in melody but still be in the same key B major... Play the G# minor scale.. its B majors relative minor (6 interval or letter in the scale) it has all the same notes as B major but its tonic or root note is different to give a a minor feel ... for a second then you can go back to B major like nothing happend and lets you feel like you know what your doing.. good for solos

That makes absolutely no difference, it's all just the B major scale. Any difference in "feel" is in your head, the backing determines the tonic.

Great Guitar Myths #47: "playing the relative minor"
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#16
Quote by steven seagull
That makes absolutely no difference, it's all just the B major scale. Any difference in "feel" is in your head, the backing determines the tonic.

Great Guitar Myths #47: "playing the relative minor"


bingo. sorry, eli, you're not really playing G# minor. B major is B major, no matter how you slice it.

it all depends on the backing (concrete or implied).
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#17
Quote by steven seagull
That makes absolutely no difference, it's all just the B major scale. Any difference in "feel" is in your head, the backing determines the tonic.

Great Guitar Myths #47: "playing the relative minor"


and his question ... how to play the B major scale... i just told him another way... G# minor... i dont know his backing .... if no backing then you can change your own tonic... whos stopping you??.. and the difference in feel is in how you play not your head he could easily choose not to play the G# note at all until he wants a minor sound ....
thats like saying theres no differences in modes ... which G# is the aeolian mode of B major. just like you can play B major from the D note all the way through to the D again and its the Phrygian mode (same with all modes) ... gives a darker feel than the major or minor scale but still the same notes.
#18
Quote by elihu4321
and his question ... how to play the B major scale... i just told him another way... G# minor... i dont know his backing .... if no backing then you can change your own tonic... whos stopping you??.. and the difference in feel is in how you play not your head he could easily choose not to play the G# note at all until he wants a minor sound ....
thats like saying theres no differences in modes ... which G# is the aeolian mode of B major. just like you can play B major from the D note all the way through to the D again and its the Phrygian mode (same with all modes) ... gives a darker feel than the major or minor scale but still the same notes.


But there is a backing here, and it's a song in B major. Therefore you will always be playing some form of the B major scale.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#19
Quote by AlanHB
But there is a backing here, and it's a song in B major. Therefore you will always be playing some form of the B major scale.

okay i admit i may be a lil wrong mr wolf corrected me in another thread haha.. but
now i am confused .... yes you will be always playing a B major scale just at different intervals.. same notes... just started and ended on one other than B to give it a variation sound of the B major... is this legal in guitar world??
#20
If you land on a note other than the B root when playing over a B chord, you are more than likely playing a chord tone or extension of the B major chord.
#21
ok i think i ran that in the ground ... im gonna blame that on pulling a all nighter
do you know any good lessons that teach the use of extension chords i would like to incorporate these in my playing. i like to sound a little out of sync but sound well from begining to end and i think an odd use of extensions may give me a lil bit of that sound...
#23
Quote by shadowmaster036
i have about 2 weeks before the talent show... the song's tonic is B. i know this much.



What exactly do you have to do in the talent show? Like is there a specific guitar part or are you going to improvise? The more details we know about this, the easier it will be to give you useful advice.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 27, 2010,
#24
Quote by MapOfYourHead
If you land on a note other than the B root when playing over a B chord, you are more than likely playing a chord tone or extension of the B major chord.


Close, it's any chord when in the key of B major. So say you have a song in B major, and it has a chord progression B maj, F# maj, G# min, E maj. You solo with the scale of B major over all of them. It does not change, in notes or name.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#25
Quote by AlanHB
Close, it's any chord when in the key of B major. So say you have a song in B major, and it has a chord progression B maj, F# maj, G# min, E maj. You solo with the scale of B major over all of them. It does not change, in notes or name.


I was answering this,

Quote by elihu4321

just started and ended on one other than B to give it a variation sound of the B major... is this legal in guitar world??


He asked if it's alright to land on a note other than B when playing over a B major chord. I explained what was happening when he does that.
#26
Quote by MapOfYourHead

He asked if it's alright to land on a note other than B when playing over a B major chord. I explained what was happening when he does that.


He didn't actually mention a B major chord, but you did. Sorry if I misunderstood you.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#27
"started and ended on one other than B to give it a variation sound of the B major..."

Surely "chord" is the obvious thing to follow the last word, seeing that he is talking about playing scales over something....but whatevers.
#28
Quote by MapOfYourHead
"started and ended on one other than B to give it a variation sound of the B major..."

Surely "chord" is the obvious thing to follow the last word, seeing that he is talking about playing scales over something....but whatevers.


I actually assumed that it would be "scale" that goes in next.

We just need to make sure that the explanations are clear enough that the "m" word does not come into play through a confused soul.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#29
And once again simplicity has devolved into scale rants.
Quote by steven seagull

Great Guitar Myths #47: "playing the relative minor"

lol someone should make a complete list of these.

Also TS, giving us some more info about the Talent show would help, unless you just wanted the scale pattern.
lol guitar
#30
Quote by elihu4321
okay i admit i may be a lil wrong mr wolf corrected me in another thread haha.. but
now i am confused .... yes you will be always playing a B major scale just at different intervals.. same notes... just started and ended on one other than B to give it a variation sound of the B major... is this legal in guitar world??


As long as the tonic is still on B, you're going to be in B Major, no matter what note you start or end on. If you want to play the minor, the tonic would be on a completely different note, and it would sound "out of key" with the backing, or it would just sound like B Major...

Quote by shadowmaster036
i have about 2 weeks before the talent show... the song's tonic is B. i know this much.


If the songs tonic is B, then that will most likely be B Major or B Minor in todays music. I already told you the B Major, but if it's in B Minor, the tabs would look like this:

e-----------------------------------------------7-9-10---
B----------------------------------------8-10-------------
G-------------------------------7-9-11-------------------
D----------------------7-9-11----------------------------
A-------------7-9-10-------------------------------------
E ---7-9-10-----------------------------------------------

For us to really help you, we probably need some more information. Are you trying to solo over a song your covering? Or are you improvising to some kind of back up track? and if you are covering a song, what song is it? It would really help if we knew some more details...
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
Last edited by sites.nick at Jun 28, 2010,
#31
im wasnt talking about chords... i was just talking about individual notes... in the major scale... but i completly disregarded the background music sorry.... on a side note.. would it sound good if the band changed tonics with me??? (a tonic that was in the B maj. scale) --- would this simply be a key change?
Last edited by elihu4321 at Jun 28, 2010,
#32
Quote by elihu4321
im wasnt talking about chords... i was just talking about individual notes... in the major scale... but i completly disregarded the background music sorry.... on a side note.. would it sound good if the band changed tonics with me??? (a tonic that was in the B maj. scale) --- would this simply be a key change?


I wasn't talking about chords either, but it's pretty much the same idea both ways, and yes, if you all changed your tonic, that would be changing the key, making it a key change... and it would sound good, if you do it right, people do that all the time.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#33
could you explain that... maybe im just not reading this right or just a lil off haha..
how is it the same .. say i have the B major scale.. why when i talk about individual notes do i have to include major or minor ... to get a chord i need 2 more notes with that b chord.. to me only time to say B major is when you have a R(B) 3 and 5
#34
I am horrible at explaining these kind of things, but I'll try my best, mabey someone else can clear this up...

The tonic (or root) note, both in scales and in chords, is the note that defines what scale you are using.

Lets compare B maj chord with individual notes in the B maj scale for an example. B maj (chord) is B D# and F#, B is the tonic. you can play these notes together to make a chord, or seperatly like you might do in a riff using the B Major scale, but B is still the root note.

Quote by elihu4321
say i have the B major scale.. why when i talk about individual notes do i have to include major or minor ... to get a chord i need 2 more notes with that b chord.. to me only time to say B major is when you have a R(B) 3 and 5


Sounds like you basically understand this here, when you are playing an individual note, there is no major or minor, just that note, but that note may be in a specific scale, like what I was getting at, that may be Major or Minor. Chords can also be major or minor, because of how the individual notes interact with each other inside the chords.

Hope I didn't butcher that too bad, and hope you got something out of that.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
Last edited by sites.nick at Jun 29, 2010,