#1
The polyrhythm i am trying to play goes like this:

|---3--------3---------3--------------|
|--------3--------3---------3---------|
|---------------------------------------|
|---------------------------------------|
|---3--3--3--3--3--3--3--3--------|
|---------------------------------------|


It is a 4:3 polyryhthm but when i play it i cant get my thumb to stay in 4/4 time and it ends up in 3/4 time with the rest of the notes,

What can I do to practice keeping the time separate?
#3
is that all you can do while learning polyrythms?


thanks for the advice! il fix a cup of coffee and get to practicing
#4
guys i dont think i've ever heard of this polyrhythm ... know anybands that make good use of it i can listen to?
#5
Quote by elihu4321
guys i dont think i've ever heard of this polyrhythm ... know anybands that make good use of it i can listen to?

Meshuggah?
#6
why the ? are you confused if they do or not
or is it like a duh? ?
#7
Meshuggah use polymeters, only sometimes do they add polyrhythms, big difference mate.
TS, try to tap the 4:3 polyrhythm with your hands consistently. Then switch it to tapping it with one hand, but different fingers for the different rhythms. Then try to apply while playing the melody.
#8
Quote by Keth
Meshuggah use polymeters, only sometimes do they add polyrhythms, big difference mate.
TS, try to tap the 4:3 polyrhythm with your hands consistently. Then switch it to tapping it with one hand, but different fingers for the different rhythms. Then try to apply while playing the melody.


Could you explain how they are different please?
#9
and what each of them are.... these are terms i've never heard before... all i can take from it is 2 diff. rhythms in diff. times are played together... sounds interesting
#10
It is used a lot in progressive rock and progressive metal, I can try to explain it to those of you who have never heard of it before but it would make more sense if you googled it because i am still new and dont quite understand it fully either
#11
I'll explain them each:

Polylmeter - Literally, more than one meter. You take one meter and stack it on top of another.


Ex.
4/4 |[color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4||
5/4 |[color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 5 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 5 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 5 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 5||


I colored the 1 of each measure in each time signature so you can see how they line up. This is all a polymeter is.

Polyrhythms are a bit harder to explain. But they are just two rhythms stacked. By this, I mean something like 3:2 or 4:3, not 8 8th notes over 4 quarter notes cause, technically, those are the same rhythm.

In most polyrhythm you have some sort of tuplet over the beat. Like, for example, in a 3:2 polyrhythm you could have 12 triplet 8th notes in the space of 8 8th notes. And, a non-tuplet version would be 3 half notes in the space of 2 dotted half notes.



It's a lot harder to draw, so here's a picture of a 3:2.
Last edited by DiminishedFifth at Jun 27, 2010,
#12
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I'll explain them each:

Polylmeter - Literally, more than one meter. You take one meter and stack it on top of another.


Ex.
4/4 |[color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4||
5/5 |[color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 5 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 5 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 5 [color="red"]1[/color] 2 3 4 5||


I colored the 1 of each measure in each time signature so you can see how they line up. This is all a polymeter is.

Polyrhythms are a bit harder to explain. But they are just two rhythms stacked. By this, I mean something like 3:2 or 4:3, not 8 8th notes over 4 quarter notes cause, technically, those are the same rhythm.

In most polyrhythm you have some sort of tuplet over the beat. Like, for example, in a 3:2 polyrhythm you could have 12 triplet 8th notes in the space of 8 8th notes. And, a non-tuplet version would be 3 half notes in the space of 2 dotted half notes.



It's a lot harder to draw, so here's a picture of a 3:2.



#13
i figured out a really simple way to explain polyrythms to someone.
with your right foot, tap quarter notes.
1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4.
now, with your hands, tap triplets over the quarter notes.
1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a (my drum teacher taught me to count triplets as one and uh two and uh, i know there is other ways to count them)
so with your foot your just doing quarter notes, and your hand are just triplets.

now, to play a polyrhythm, just keep tapping the rhythms, and keep moving both hands, but dont actually hit the surface of whatever your tapping with your left hand.
so your hands are still moving in triplets, but dont make contact (or hit a drum) with your left hand.
if you do it correctly, your right hand and your right foot will be doing a polyrhythm.

(basically you play every other triplet)


EDIT: hahaa i felt like a had a musical revalation when i realized polyrhythms is just every other triplet.
kinda like triplet in half time? idk if that would work
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Last edited by musicTHEORYnerd at Jun 27, 2010,