#1
Hello peoples, welcome to another Floyd thread. In today's episode, I've screwed around with my Jackson Kelly too much and have no idea what to do anymore.

It all started when I started tuning to drop C for a new band, then changed string gauges to 11s. Then I spent a few hours messing with spring, truss rod, and action adjustments. Unfortunately, I don't really know what I'm doing.

So, the problem is that my action is too high on the higher frets, but lowering the action results in fret buzz. It's gotten to the point where it isn't really comfortably playable in either situation. I know for a fact that my truss rod is not where it should be right now, but I don't know where it should be.

So...
1. How do I know when my truss rod is in a good position.
2. Once I have the truss rod worked out, what exactly do I do to get the action perfect
3. Should I just take this to a professional or what? (what are they called...luthiers?) If so, what do they usually cost?
#2
I'd honestly suggest getting it a pro setup.. Especially if you have no idea how to work your way around a pain-in-the-ass Floyd.

Pro setup for an FR was like $50 for my Ibanez RG350 back when I had it. (My god those Edge III's are SH*T)
#3
On your fretboard, press the string down at the 1st fret and the 17th fret, on the low E string, while your guitar is in the tuning you want it in. Next, judge the space between the low E string at the 7th fret. What does that gap look like? A good space to have is somewhere around the thickness of a credit card(given the fact that you are playing with .011's) At this point you have your truss rod adjusted somewhat correctly.

Next, you start adjusting your action, but keep an eye on the 7th fret spacing while you make your adjustments.
Last edited by charles_ebarb at Jun 27, 2010,
#4
Ok so I've just discovered the limit for how loose I can make the truss rod. Turned counter clockwise a lot which succeeded in raising the action a little but the bottom string (gauge 54 tuned to C) is maybe half a millimeter off the 7th fret when I fret the 1st and 17th. I don't think I can turn the rod any more since it's rotating freely without any resistance at this point...is that really ok?

My bridge is completely level and flush with my body, so I don't think there's a problem with the spring tension in the back. The action is up one complete rotation on both of the action screws, but that wouldn't affect the width of the space when 1st and 17th are fretted, why is there so little room?
#5
Quote by 6StringSlaughtr
Ok so I've just discovered the limit for how loose I can make the truss rod. Turned counter clockwise a lot which succeeded in raising the action a little but the bottom string (gauge 54 tuned to C) is maybe half a millimeter off the 7th fret when I fret the 1st and 17th. I don't think I can turn the rod any more since it's rotating freely without any resistance at this point...is that really ok?

My bridge is completely level and flush with my body, so I don't think there's a problem with the spring tension in the back. The action is up one complete rotation on both of the action screws, but that wouldn't affect the width of the space when 1st and 17th are fretted, why is there so little room?


yes, that is fine, for now, but you want to make sure the truss rob nut is secure, thus turning it lightly until it begins to tighten. (clock-wise) Now, every few days, you need to double check the neck using this method of depressing the low E string.

The action at the bridge can effect the space at the 7th fret. If you action is too high, it can cause undue force to actually warp your neck. (And that is nothing you want, believe me!) This is why most people tend to get the action as low as it can go. And playing with heavy strings is kinda hit and miss with floyds.

Can you post a pic of the bridge, a sideview would be great, so I can get a look at where the bridge is floating, right now? A cell phone pic is fine, btw
#7
yep. those are perfect.

OK Next step.

If you can, adjust the saddle screws lower. the distance you need to take the saddle screws down, is the thickness of a "thin" guitar pick. or 2 pieces of standard printer paper. After you do this, you will need to loosen the strings and take ALL the tension off the floyd and raise the BASE of the floyd UP the same distance. This will offset what you did to the saddle screws. (The reason you need to loosen all the strings is because, if you adjust those pivot screws while the floyd is under tension, you risk damage to the contact points, thus rendering your floyd useless. )

Now, after that is all done, put everything back, bringing the strings back to pitch( your tuning) and then recheck the action at the 7th freat again. After that is to your licking. depress the whammy a few times....VERY GENTLY !!! And then check the tuning. Did the strings lose their tune? If not... so far so good....

NOw you need to check for fret buzz on all strings, between the 1st and 5th freats. No buzz? then you are ALL CLEAR!

But keep in mind, your truss rob nut. You need to recheck your action every few dys. You are looking for any "settling" of the neck. So make a mental note you your guitar feels when this is all done. and in a few days, if it feels different, just adjust the accordingly!
#8
Quote by charles_ebarb
On your fretboard, press the string down at the 1st fret and the 17th fret, on the low E string, while your guitar is in the tuning you want it in. Next, judge the space between the low E string at the 7th fret. What does that gap look like? A good space to have is somewhere around the thickness of a credit card(given the fact that you are playing with .011's) At this point you have your truss rod adjusted somewhat correctly.

Next, you start adjusting your action, but keep an eye on the 7th fret spacing while you make your adjustments.


1st and 19th, where the neck meets the body.
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#9
Quote by IbanezRGS
1st and 19th, where the neck meets the body.



true. but even with his gauge of strings? I would figure it too "fine" an adjustment for 011's.
#10
Ok let me make sure I've got this right...take a loot at my attachment first...

I turn all the saddle screws down a little, then take the tension off the strings, then turn the pivot screws up? Jeez I wish I had known about that last part, I've been moving those things up and down like it's nobody's business without removing any tension...
Attachments:
Image30.jpg
#11
yes, you have them circled correctly. pivot screws on left side of pic. those are the ones you need to be careful with.


Now that you said that, about the pivot screws, you need to completely remove the bridge and put it under a magnifying glass and look at the contact points. if there is any "burs" or "indentions" at these points that make contact with the pivot screws. You will never be able to keep your bridge in tune. in other words, it's basically junk, now.
Last edited by charles_ebarb at Jun 27, 2010,
#12
Ok, saddle screws are all at about 3/4 of their max depth. Turned the pivot screws up half a turn (they're now at 1 and 1/2 full rotations up). Action is now super high, no fret buzz of course. Strings stay in tune and truss rod stays where I put it. Only problem is high action (still). Thanks for the help but I don't think I can do much more myself...definitely looking for a pro in the morning that I can take this to.

You guys rock
#13
If you want to continue this, just make SUPER small adjustments to the action, turning the pivot screws down in VERY small increments. This is the part that is time consuming, bro. because it is basically;
make a super small adjustment, bring the strings to pitch and check your work. and then over and over, until it's where you want it.

I totally understand how ya feel, bro! It's a damn headache at first, but it is good knowledge to have! especially if you get a guitar every few months, it can get expensive running them to a set-up techie. =/ that's why I learned all this.
#14
I'm just worried about what damage I might have already done to those pivot screws. Looking at them now, I see that I've worn away the outer layer and I can see a copper color underneath

Oh well what's done is done, I'm going to bed
#16
Quote by 6StringSlaughtr
I'm just worried about what damage I might have already done to those pivot screws. Looking at them now, I see that I've worn away the outer layer and I can see a copper color underneath

Oh well what's done is done, I'm going to bed


Thats bad lol

First floyd rose i had id just turn the pivot screws without taking the tension off, and now its trash. If i even look at the trem bar while its unattached and on the floor, the strings go out of tune haha...just be careful
#18
Quote by charles_ebarb
If you want to continue this, just make SUPER small adjustments to the action, turning the pivot screws down in VERY small increments. This is the part that is time consuming, bro. because it is basically;
make a super small adjustment, bring the strings to pitch and check your work. and then over and over, until it's where you want it.

I totally understand how ya feel, bro! It's a damn headache at first, but it is good knowledge to have! especially if you get a guitar every few months, it can get expensive running them to a set-up techie. =/ that's why I learned all this.



Action's really not that hard or time consuming to work with. He just needs to completely dump the bar, and adjust. There's no need to make tiny, tiny adjustments.
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#19
Hey guys guess I'm not done with this thread yet...

First of all, could you please explain what you mean by "dump the bar and adjust" biga29? Are you talking about just pushing down the trem arm so I can make my adjustments without tension on the bridge? I hope so because that's what I've been doing

Anyhow, I had this crazy idea where I undo these two screws (see attachment) so that I can remove that whole black base plate which the locks screw into. I figured that if I take that black base off and stick some of these super thin steel shims in there to raise it about a millimeter or less, it might fix my fret buzz problem. Then I could lower the action at the bridge and be set.

Stupid idea or what?
Attachments:
Image31.jpg
#20
Yeh, that's what I meant.^

And you could do the shim thing, but only if it's necessary. There are countless other ways to fix fret buzz.

Go talk to Jenny in the Set-Up thread, giver her all the details, what you've done, and what you plan on doing. She can help you mare than i can.
You can call me Aaron.


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Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...