#1
Hi guys i got a rhythm guitar question... i like to play rock music and noticed i havent seen a lot of like 9th chords or 11 chords ..... ok straight up truth i know no other chords than the majors and minors and barre.... i am starting to work on 7 chords but would like to know other types than just the ones i know ...
anyway i am asking for a chord progression making good use of these chords so i can practice them... and do you all know of any rock bands or any heavier genre that uses these chords? i would like to listen to how they use em for their playing.
#2
Hendrix, things like the wind cries mary or little wing, castles made of sand, even "fire" as well as the obvious pruple haze and foxy lady (using the infamous E7#9) enjoy!
#3
sweet do you know any bands today that use these? i will def. look at hendrix tho i have not learned one song of his yet.. i like how little wing sounds .. i'll start there
#4
does anyone know if blind melon use any... i remeber they have a jazzy rock sound .. does jazz make use of these chords the most?
#5
Not really dude, I am pretty old school in my tastes lol, foo fighters and keith urban use inversions alot (G/B etc), or if you get really inspired and a little brave theres always jazz
#7
thanks .. i've never really listen to any jazz kinda just listened to what was around me...
i dont know how much theory you know but i have a q. say i have a standard scale box with the name of the notes in order... like E F G A B C D and wanted to make a progression using the 7 chords and all of of would this be acceptable Em G7 A Em B9 C Ddim Em..forgetting what chords should be minor and major and dim. can you just add the number and it work like that. so i can make my own progressions or is there more theory on which chords can only be 7's 9's ect. in the same key??
#9
ok, some good lesons on UG, but basically its called harmonising the scale, usually do it with the major scale first, then try it with the minor and modes, but in general I think the order changes, so to my knowledge the chords are the same in C major and A minor, but in a different order (Am being the relative minor of C major).

Example

Key of C Major

Cmaj7
Dmin7
Emin7
Fmaj7
Gdom7 (ordinary 7th you might see it as, i.e. G7)
Amin7
Bm7b5 (half diminished)

Now each of those chords is built using notes from the key of C major, so

Cmaj7 C E G B

Dmin7 D F A C

Emin7 E G B D

Fmaj7 F A C E

Gdom7 G B D F

Amin7 A C E G

Bmin7b5 B D F A


Now, you may ask, why is Dmin7 a Dmin7 not a D maj7? The answer is that for it to be a D major it would need to have the notes D F#A C#. Now in the Key of C we have no sharps or flats, hence we can;t have F# (3rd note of the D major scale) or the C# (7th note of the D major scale). Therefore we have to flatten thse two notes, the 3rd and the 7th,

A major chord is always made uo of the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the scale, and in the case of a maj7th chord the 7th note of the scale. So a maj7th chord would be 1 3 5 7. Now a minor chord is always 1 b3 5, or 1 b3 5 b7 in the case of a minor7th chord. Therefore a minor7th chord is 1 b3 5 b7. So in the case of D, we ave flattened the 3rd and 7th notes of the Dmaj7 chord because they did not fit in the c major scale, and hence made it a Dmin7.

Hope that makes sense, can take a bit for these theory things to make sense, as I said some good lessons on UG or youtube, but that will give you a basic idea I hope!
#10
yea i fig. a lot of blues used 9ths and 7ths ... and when you say funk .... like? i would like to learn some nice funk riffs i can see me trying to make funk more rockish.
Last edited by elihu4321 at Jun 27, 2010,
#11
thanks. i have a self lesson coming up thats over harmony with major scale.. so were on the right track... so from your ex. from Cmaj scale you made everything have a 7.. so if i wanted to make my own progressions can i freely make this up and it be theory approved (note i do not have a guitar while doing this so no idea how it sounds) Cmaj F7 (or 9) Dmin7 G Am Cmajor....
#13
just so im clear i know that according to what key your in you have some chords that are going to be minor and major and dim... its a rule but i never seen any of the other chords explained ... so i can add a 7,9, or 11 to any and it would just make it a maj7, min 9 dim 11, etc.. no special rules to watch for?
and are there any other chords that were leaving out...
i know 5's are power chords and thats the only # chord i know by heart everywhere.
triads are 3's and arp. are 4 .... maybe.... ??
#14
oh and i remember you talking about interversions ... is that just slash chords (main chord whit a bass note over it???
#15
Quote by elihu4321
oh and i remember you talking about interversions ... is that just slash chords (main chord whit a bass note over it???


Not sure about that one. But inversions are when the lowest note is raised by an octave, changing the order of the notes. For example, a C major triad in it's root position is CEG. When you raise the C by an octave, you get the first inversion of C major, which is EGC. Doing that again gives you the second inversion, which is GCE. And then doing it one more time gives you the root position, CEG, but an octave higher than the original. Hope that helps some
#16
This chart shows the available extensions for each chord in a Major or minor key.

Diatonic chords - Major and minor keys


Roman numerals = triad level
underneath = available extensions.


Something you can practice is taking a standard chord progression, like maybe a ii V I, and then experiment adding colors to the chords.

Examples..

Dm7 G7 CMaj7

Dm9 G13 CMaj9

Dm11 G9 CMaj13
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 27, 2010,
#17
Quote by stickfigurekill
Not sure about that one. But inversions are when the lowest note is raised by an octave, changing the order of the notes. For example, a C major triad in it's root position is CEG. When you raise the C by an octave, you get the first inversion of C major, which is EGC. Doing that again gives you the second inversion, which is GCE. And then doing it one more time gives you the root position, CEG, but an octave higher than the original. Hope that helps some


so kinda like chord vocings or just different ways to play a chord with a name on it?
if i got it or not it helped cause i never heard the word before today. thanks

so i guess you could pick the triads and be a minor lead part but could you do the same inversions with arppeggios?
#18
Quote by GuitarMunky
This chart shows the available extensions for each chord in a Major or minor key.

Diatonic chords - Major and minor keys


Roman numerals = triad level
underneath = available extensions.


Something you can practice is taking a standard chord progression, like maybe a ii V I, and then experiment adding colors to the chords.

Examples..

Dm7 G7 CMaj7

Dm9 G13 CMaj9

Dm11 G9 CMaj13

THANK YOU for giving me some chord progressions to try i think i can take this and go a little more advanced with it in a few weeks.. and love the chart that'll work til i memorize it and make up all i can.
#19
an arpeggio is simply a chord played one note at a time, can be anything from a triad to a massive chord extension.
#20
Quote by HendrixClaptonP
an arpeggio is simply a chord played one note at a time, can be anything from a triad to a massive chord extension.

yea i don't know where my mind was when i was was asking that... whats the biggest extension you can do ... a 11?
#21
Quote by elihu4321
yea i don't know where my mind was when i was was asking that... whats the biggest extension you can do ... a 11?


13. honestly, you can go further than that...but it's really not practical to.

C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C
1   3   5   7   9   11  13

C E G B D F A = Cmaj13
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Last edited by AeolianWolf at Jun 28, 2010,
#22
cool... this may be a odd question or my brain might not be working right now.
say i had that Cmaj13 and (if i had the fingers available) be able to add more C notes to it and it still be a Cmaj13?
if yes could i add another g note and it stay the same??
thanks
#23
Quote by elihu4321
cool... this may be a odd question or my brain might not be working right now.
say i had that Cmaj13 and (if i had the fingers available) be able to add more C notes to it and it still be a Cmaj13?
if yes could i add another g note and it stay the same??
thanks

Yes. Technically if you added a G as the lowest note, you would specify that: Cmaj13/G


And you do have enough fingers! You're just using the wrong instrument!
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#24
haha nice ... what instrument is the best then... i might change
ok could you answer this ... Cmaj13/G --- thats a slash chord? like a Cmaj13 bass note over a G?? or G bass note over a Cmaj13..( i haven't really studied slash chords (and if you could list songs that use good work of slash chords i'd appreciate it.... i don't really know when to use em...)
#25
Quote by elihu4321
cool... this may be a odd question or my brain might not be working right now.
say i had that Cmaj13 and (if i had the fingers available) be able to add more C notes to it and it still be a Cmaj13?
if yes could i add another g note and it stay the same??
thanks


yes -- you should probably look into voicing chords if you haven't yet already.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#26
Quote by elihu4321
haha nice ... what instrument is the best then... i might change
ok could you answer this ... Cmaj13/G --- thats a slash chord? like a Cmaj13 bass note over a G?? or G bass note over a Cmaj13..( i haven't really studied slash chords (and if you could list songs that use good work of slash chords i'd appreciate it.... i don't really know when to use em...)

Well, if you want to play 8 or 9 notes at once, clearly, I'd go with piano, naturally.

And it is a G bass over a Cmaj13. I don't really know all that much regarding slash chords past what they are.

Folk music is one of the most common genres that use slash chords. One that comes to mind is Bob Dylan's "The Times They Are A-Changin.'" When he sings that lyric, "so you better start swimmin or you'll sink like a stone," he plays a D chord and descends the lowest note. (Or at least that's how I learned it...)
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#27
Quote by hockeyplayer168


Folk music is one of the most common genres that use slash chords. One that comes to mind is Bob Dylan's "The Times They Are A-Changin.'" When he sings that lyric, "so you better start swimmin or you'll sink like a stone," he plays a D chord and descends the lowest note. (Or at least that's how I learned it...)


I think I know what you mean-- also there are a handful of Beatles songs that use slash chords in a similar way. Check out You've Got to Hide Your Love Away (right before the chorus) and We Can Work It Out (in the bridge, "life is very short...")

Another thing on slash chords...keep in mind that sometimes, a slash chord is actually very similar to a 11 or 13 chord. Take for example Ab/Bb. (speaking of Beatles songs, Ab/Bb is the second chord in The Long and Winding Road) The notes of the Ab chord are Ab, C, and Eb. The interval from Bb (the bass note) to Ab is a dominant 7th. The interval from Bb to C is a major 9th. The interval from Bb to Eb is a major 11th. So this chord actually has many of the notes of Bb11, and sounds very similar. Technically though, it does not have all the notes of the Bb11 chord. However I've found that when playing chords on guitar you're not always necessarily going to have every single note of chord, especially like with an 11 chord, which has 6 different notes.
Yamaha FG295S
LR Baggs A1 pickup
#28
Quote by stasz
I think I know what you mean-- also there are a handful of Beatles songs that use slash chords in a similar way. Check out You've Got to Hide Your Love Away (right before the chorus) and We Can Work It Out (in the bridge, "life is very short...")

No doubt, actually , "You've Got to Hide Your Love Away" was Lennon's attempt at a Dylanesque folk song.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.