#1
I have been practicing my chords and playing in key and all that good stuff for a long time now. I have become pretty good with the stuff I mentioned but I am now looking to expand and learn how to embellish these chords to give them a little flavor.

I have been learning Neil Young's song "the needle and the damage done" and he has a pretty sweet embellishment going on over the C chord, it comes in after a bit of a walking bassline.

My question is, how do I know which notes to hammer on and/or play so that the piece stays in key? I imagine that if I am playing over a Cmaj chord, throwing in Cminor embellishments wouldnt work, so I guess I would embellish that Cmaj into a CMaj7 and stuff of that nature...chords that are over all major sounding if the chord you are embillshing is major? and chords that are minor sounding if the chord you embellishing are minor?

thanks in advance...

also are there any youtube video lessons that anyone could recommend on this subject?
#2
Learn about diatonic harmony, chord/scale construction and the notes on the neck.

Once you know that, use your ear to find what you like and don't like.
#3
Quote by MapOfYourHead
Learn about diatonic harmony, chord/scale construction and the notes on the neck.

Once you know that, use your ear to find what you like and don't like.


just answer the question moron............

embelishing the chord with notes any notes really, but try to emphasize notes that make up the chord. Cmaj made up of (C-E-G scale degrees) can be sparked with c (tonic) scale degree mediant (e) (g)dominant and possibly leading tonic (b) depending or whether or not you hate jazz or not. any other note or scale degree that is in the key of c major (d, f, a, maybe b) is a passing note, use it, but control it, don't let it have too much of an emphasis.

that is it. if you don't understand that take a bat and bludgeon someone
Last edited by LightPermeable at Jun 27, 2010,
#4
Quote by LightPermeable
just answer the question moron............

embelishing the chord with notes any notes really, but try to emphasize notes that make up the chord. Cmaj made up of (C-E-G scale degrees) can be sparked with c (tonic) scale degree mediant (e) (g)dominant and possibly leading tonic (b) depending or whether or not you hate jazz or not. any other note or scale degree that is in the key of c major (d, f, a, maybe b) is a passing note, use it, but control it, don't let it have too much of an emphasis.

that is it. if you don't understand that take a bat and bludgeon someone


He did answer the question, moron...

...reported moron at that
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#5
Quote by steven seagull

He did answer the question, moron...

...reported moron at that


thank you but you see, i did nothing wrong. i don't know why you had to jump in here and slap things up
#6
Quote by LightPermeable
just answer the question moron............



actually he did.

rather than insult him, why not just give your own advice and leave it at that?
shred is gaudy music
#7
Quote by LightPermeable
thank you but you see, i did nothing wrong. i don't know why you had to jump in here and slap things up

because it's the internet and I can do whatever I want with it?

Sometimes just look at porn all day but I fancied a change today.

I suggest you drop the attitude or your stay here is going to be awfully short.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#8
Quote by PattyCakes
I have been practicing my chords and playing in key and all that good stuff for a long time now. I have become pretty good with the stuff I mentioned but I am now looking to expand and learn how to embellish these chords to give them a little flavor.

I have been learning Neil Young's song "the needle and the damage done" and he has a pretty sweet embellishment going on over the C chord, it comes in after a bit of a walking bassline.

My question is, how do I know which notes to hammer on and/or play so that the piece stays in key? I imagine that if I am playing over a Cmaj chord, throwing in Cminor embellishments wouldnt work, so I guess I would embellish that Cmaj into a CMaj7 and stuff of that nature...chords that are over all major sounding if the chord you are embillshing is major? and chords that are minor sounding if the chord you embellishing are minor?

thanks in advance...

also are there any youtube video lessons that anyone could recommend on this subject?



Well, as has been mentioned, you would need to get your head around some theoretical concepts..... if you want to understand what's going in something like "needle and the damage done".


You could of-course just listen. Honestly thats what you'll be doing anyway..... and I'm pretty sure Neil Young hasn't spent too much time studying theory.... and he probably doesn't use it as a guide for composition...... my personal conjecture..... HE LISTENS.

* please nobody mistake that statement as a suggestion to avoid theory..... far from it. Just that you can embellish chords NOW..... no need to wait until you understand it.... though that would be great if you get there.

so in a word...

LISTEN.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 27, 2010,
#9
Well I do understand that C is made up of C E G and E is E B G# and such, I dont know I just thought there were adding in flavor notes that were outside of the chord tones, i guess I didnt look at it much, but I guess pulling up the scale for the key I am playing in while I am playing and just throwing in random notes around from the scale that are around the chord I am playing would be a good way to start then?
#10
Quote by PattyCakes
Well I do understand that C is made up of C E G and E is E B G# and such, I dont know I just thought there were adding in flavor notes that were outside of the chord tones, i guess I didnt look at it much, but I guess pulling up the scale for the key I am playing in while I am playing and just throwing in random notes around from the scale that are around the chord I am playing would be a good way to start then?

Pretty much yes, most of the time if a note sounds good when added to a chord it's going to come from the major scale of that chord's root. Not that it doesn't necessarily have to come from the major scale of the song's tonic, using notes that fit with an individual chord is a good way to identify out-of-key notes to use, both in terms of chord construction and lead playing.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com