#1
Can someone give me a basic run through of compression??? I hear it's important, but I have no idea how it works and how it's used.

If you could point me to something else online that would help, that'd be great too.

Aldo, in audacity, there is an "effect" called Normalization. What is that and what does it do?

I realize that this is rather broad, but anything would help

Thanks Pit
John 3:16 = Truth

Sight reading tableture = Guitar Hero for real guitarists
#2
Here's the compression that goes on producing-wise (I'm assuming you're not talking about compression pedals?). Wikipedia Article.

A little summary in music production.

Quote by Wikipedia
Compression is often used in music production to make performances more consistent in dynamic range so that they "sit" in the mix of other instruments better and maintain consistent attention from the listener. Vocal performances in rock music or pop music are usually compressed in order to make them stand out from the surrounding instruments and to add to the clarity of the vocal performance.

Compression can also be used on instrument sounds to create effects not primarily focused on boosting loudness. For instance, drum and cymbal sounds tend to decay quickly, but a compressor can make the sound appear to have a more sustained tail. Guitar sounds are often compressed in order to obtain a fuller, more sustained sound.


Here's the Audacity Wiki on Normalize. Don't use Audacity, so maybe you can make better sense of it.

Hopefully it helps
Look!

Learn how to spell, grammar is your friend

Member #11 of the Les Paul owners club, pm Waterboy799 to join.

Blues player of the Laney Cult
#3
Compression: squashes the peaks of the audio signal

Normalization: sets the peak of an audio signal to 0db (maximum)
#4
^ Surprisingly helpful first post.

EDIT: SOCALLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL


but try the main Recordings & Riffs forum (not the sub forums for songs). Those guys know their stuff.
has a terrible signature.
#5
^ That, compression basically brings the quieter parts louder and the louder parts quieter, so it 'compresses' or 'squashes' the audio. The peaks and troughs in audio are known as 'dynamics'.

Normalisation makes the audio as loud as possible without compressing it, so the loudest peak is brought to 0db
#6
Quote by Austyn6661
^ Surprisingly helpful first post.

EDIT: SOCALLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL


but try the main Recordings & Riffs forum (not the sub forums for songs). Those guys know their stuff.



Thanks, will do!
John 3:16 = Truth

Sight reading tableture = Guitar Hero for real guitarists
#7
John 3:16 = Truth

Sight reading tableture = Guitar Hero for real guitarists
#8
Quote by Austyn6661
^ Surprisingly helpful first post.

EDIT: SOCALLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL


but try the main Recordings & Riffs forum (not the sub forums for songs). Those guys know their stuff.

Heh, I actually remember seeing the Pit before it was a dumpster of 4chan memes (we had our own) and guys trying to troll everyone else. Old habits die hard .

Now get these damn kids out of my lawn!!

EDIT: When I said "Don't use Audacity" I meant it as "I don't use Audacity", not telling you not to use it . Just noticed.
Look!

Learn how to spell, grammar is your friend

Member #11 of the Les Paul owners club, pm Waterboy799 to join.

Blues player of the Laney Cult
Last edited by Garci at Jun 27, 2010,
#9
Quote by Garci
Heh, I actually remember seeing the Pit before it was a dumpster of 4chan memes (we had our own) and guys trying to troll everyone else. Old habits die hard .

Now get these damn kids out of my lawn!!

EDIT: When I said "Don't use Audacity" I meant it as "I don't use Audacity", not telling you not to use it . Just noticed.


To be fair, he'd be better off downloading reaper since it's free and really good ;p