#1
So I want to make some amateurish recordings of the band I'm in, but to make it sound best I'd like to do it one track at a time. First the drums, then bass, then guitar, then vocals. So I have a few questions to get started.

What software would I need on my computer to record multiple tracks?
Preferably inexpensive, I don't want to pay out the ass to make a dozen or so shitty recordings.

What type of mic would I need to record onto my computer?
I plan to put a mic up to the guitar and bass amps and recording the tracks that way, will a normal vocal microphone do?

What do I need to record an entire drumset onto my computer without it sounding like pure crap?
I'm aware that I can buy an entire drum mic set, but I'd rather not as it costs quite a bit. Are there any alternatives to this?

So there are my questions, I'm going to go do research on this stuff while I get some input from you guys.
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#2
I'd like to know how to record drums as well, for free preferably.
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#3
I use the microphone that came with ROCKBAND to mic my amp, its not wonderful, but gets the job done. The Sennheiser SM57 mic is the industry standard when it comes to mic-ing guitar and bass amps. Normally for drums, every single drum is mic'd and there are 2 overhead mics that record the cymbals. I suppose you could just go with the 2 overheads or maybe just 1, but i'm not sure how it will sound. A pretty cheap program to use is Acoustica Mixcraft, it's similar to garageband for macs but it doesn't have as many loops and they don't sound as good, but its easy to record with and the effects are decent.

EDIT: You might want to buy (or torrent if you know how) a drum program like EZdrummer to use as the drums, because they're fully programmable and you can put in any beat you want to and use it as the drum track. They sound good because they're professionally recorded samples which would be useful if you don't have drum mics.
Last edited by GibsonMan321 at Jun 27, 2010,
#4
Cool edit pro 2 is a good software. I use it every now and then, but I cannot figure out how to change the format of the recordings I make.

But Pro Tools seems to be the best, and easiest for doing this kinda stuff. I would suggest torrent DL'ing the cool edit pro 2 and messing around with it and see what you can do. It will let you record up to 64ish different tracks, and you can do them 1 at a time, as well.
#5
if you want to be as low budget as possible, get reaper, a cheap audio interface like line 6 or something, and addictive drums
periphery/bulb!

gear:
Ibanez RG7321 w/ D-sonic in bridge

Peavey 5150 mk ii & b52 4x12 cab

line 6 podxt for recording

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#6
Quote by GibsonMan321
The Sennheiser SM57 mic


*Facepalm* Oh Boy...

First off, suggesting that you torrent something here is against the rules.

Second, drums. There is no cheap way to record a halfway decent sound out of them. You'd need at least 4 mic inputs to record them well and the cheapest interface with four XLR inputs is $350. As suggested several times, you should go out and BUY a drum program like Addictive Drums or Superior Drummer. EZDrummer is meh and the samples from it sound cheap.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#7
Quote by Vasser
So I want to make some amateurish recordings of the band I'm in, but to make it sound best I'd like to do it one track at a time. First the drums, then bass, then guitar, then vocals. So I have a few questions to get started.

What software would I need on my computer to record multiple tracks?
Preferably inexpensive, I don't want to pay out the ass to make a dozen or so shitty recordings.

Is this multiple tracks, but only one at a time (like you said up above)? Audacity would work well, and it's free. Reaper is a pretty popular free audio application.


What type of mic would I need to record onto my computer?
I plan to put a mic up to the guitar and bass amps and recording the tracks that way, will a normal vocal microphone do?

Well, andy mic will pick up signals, so you really don't need a specific mic to to record onto your computer. SM58s are cheap and fairly versatile, but of course there will always be better mics for specific instrument. Bass would likely do great with an RE20, but that's more money...so maybe doing bass direct would be your best option. Do you plan to use an interface or are you trying to go directly into your computer? If the latter is the case, you'll likely need an adapter for the XLR connection on the mic. Most computers, if you're plugging directly in, use an 1/8 inch connector. The place to plug into is usually near your speaker connection. To be completely honest, I would recommend an interface...if you plan to record one track at a time, even an Mbox Mini would work, and you'd be getting protools LE along with it, which is great editting software.


What do I need to record an entire drumset onto my computer without it sounding like pure crap?
I'm aware that I can buy an entire drum mic set, but I'd rather not as it costs quite a bit. Are there any alternatives to this?

About the best thing I can recommend, since you're trying to get the entire drum sound without spending much, is to use overheads. Two mics spaced evenly apart on two sides of the drum, faced down on it at the same angle. It will get the cymbals, HH, and likely the snare well enough, but don't be surprised if the kick suffers, and the toms don't quite have their usually effect. Then of course, you can't isolate and gate/compress individual components like you could by miking the entire set, but hey...if cheap is the way you're looking to go, then this is likely your best solution. Of course, that's at least two mics (three if you end up miking the kick, as you should), which would require an interface. If you're committed to recording only one track at a time...then I'm not sure what to tell you. You could try a general room mic and boost it, or you could try one overhead focused on the components you care most about...but I can't say that it'll sound good in the least.

So there are my questions, I'm going to go do research on this stuff while I get some input from you guys.

My comments are in the red.
They say the old woman's got the wisdom
'Cause she couldn't read the clock anymore
She said "The numbers don't represent the moments"
Says she don't see what all the ticking's for
Last edited by Greenfinger182 at Jun 27, 2010,
#8
pro tools is not really that great. Let me one thing clear though I can't say go torrent something, but i can say that the software i prefer is cubase, however abelton live is a good choice as well. I really feel like pro tools is more "singer friendly" in layout and the ease of working in the actual guitar/ bass/ drums isn't quite where it should be. You'll probably have pro tools crash a lot... Honestly I recommend actually buying the software so you can get support from abelton/cubase, but i know many people will download it. There is going to be some frustrating moments if you choose to pirate and your going to lose some data, and it is illegal. That being said do what you want.

DON'T USE A ROCKBAND MIC! JUST NO!!!

In all honesty, if your expecting to get a good quality recording on a budget, don't mic stuff. Micing things is by far the most professional way to go and can deliver the best quality by far, but the amount of cash it takes to assemble the equipment you need will break all of your bandmates wallets and chances are none of you have enough experience to utilize the equipment properly. It really is a technical process, I know i never would been able to do it without my bud who worked at a recording studio for a few years, and this is coming from an engineer btw.

This is what you should do:
Get the new copy of guitar rig and a good audio box. Some of the tones on guitar rig are solid for making demo's and it makes things a lot easier for someone new to the recording process since it removes a lot of the more technical aspects

essentially your guitar/bass will be plugged directly into the sound box and you'll record from there. For drums, your just going to get shite quality unless you really know what your doing so i would really recommend obtaining a drum program (EZ Drummer is good, there are more advanced/better ones like superior drummer with plugins for specific styles of drumming like metal, jazz, etc.). Get one of those programs, they essentially work as a plugin to recording software.

As far as singing, that should be the last thing recorded so just worry about setting everything else up first. You'll have to get a vocal mic, and honestly i'd make the singer pay for it since singers can be a real pain and there just going to whine and say that the track doesn't sound like them and bla bla bla... This way they can blow a bunch of money on what they want and they have less room to bitch.

by now, assuming your googling this stuff for more info, your probably beginning to realize how expensive this stuff can be. Make sure your ready to record before spending a bunch of money since a lot of bands tend to start having problems due to unprofessional attitudes. Have everything tabbed out ahead of time and make sure that each band member can play their part perfectly in time with a metronome. Otherwise you might end up wasting a good amount of time/money.

Either way, I wish you and your band mates luck
#9
Is it April 1st?
Now running an Eleven Rack with Pro Tools 10.3.3 - it's amazing and I'm having ball with it - worth every penny. PT 10 is tops IMO and the Eleven Rack is a work of art!
#10
Quote by firebird103
I really feel like pro tools is more "singer friendly" in layout and the ease of working in the actual guitar/ bass/ drums isn't quite where it should be. You'll probably have pro tools crash a lot...


I haven't noticed it being "Singer friendly" or anything like that. I've found it pretty easy for me to do pretty much anything out of the box with Pro Tools. Then again, I did watch the DVD on how to use it that came with it.

As for crashing, it depends on what you're doing. I mean if you're mixing a track with 300 plugins added, watching vids on youtube and playing Call of Duty, its going to crash but if you've got just it and a web browser up on a halfway decent computer, it'll do fine.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#11
Quote by lockwolf
I haven't noticed it being "Singer friendly" or anything like that. I've found it pretty easy for me to do pretty much anything out of the box with Pro Tools. Then again, I did watch the DVD on how to use it that came with it.

As for crashing, it depends on what you're doing. I mean if you're mixing a track with 300 plugins added, watching vids on youtube and playing Call of Duty, its going to crash but if you've got just it and a web browser up on a halfway decent computer, it'll do fine.


umm... no. Pro tools is pretty much crap unless you buy one of the high end software packages. All of their low end models (LE) are horrendous on even excellent comps and I've seen them crash on windows quite a bit, and found it almost impossible for it to work effectively on a mac. As for singers, the entire interface is built to simplify the process of recording multiple vocal tracks. I've seen some studios that will literally only use pro tools for vocals and other interfaces for actual instruments because they hated pro tools so much. You might be content with it, but most of the rest of the world isn't and the dvd your talking about is rarely enough for most people.

TS: Just get this and a vocal mic, it will make it easy for you and its not a bad price. If you aren't happy with the amount of tones in the essential pack you could probably upgrade/come across an expansion and later on you could get superior drummer. I wouldn't say the quality would be anything you'd put on a professional album, but its plenty good for demos and I've seen some bands use guitar rig to get an idea of how their demos will sound. Its a good program and will do what you need.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=350369680875&rvr_id=&crlp=1_263602_263622&UA=%3F*S%3F&GUID=9f8d67f01250a02653520a82fe92e442&itemid=350369680875&ff4=263602_263622

Line 6 makes some similar stuff but in my experience it wasn't quite up to par. Ideally you'd be using a more traditional set up but for a tight budget this is really the best way to go.
Last edited by firebird103 at Jun 27, 2010,
#13
Quote by firebird103
umm... no. Pro tools is pretty much crap unless you buy one of the high end software packages. All of their low end models (LE) are horrendous on even excellent comps and I've seen them crash on windows quite a bit, and found it almost impossible for it to work effectively on a mac.


Which version of Pro Tools are we talking (7.4 or 8.0) cuz I'm running 8.0 on a shitty as hell computer (Athlon X2 3800+, 4gb DDR2, Vista, probably about 5 or 6 years old) with absolutely no problems whatsoever. Either I have a computer built by the Gods or you don't have a good PC to run it.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#14
1. What you need is a DAW. Screw Audacity. Don't get it. It's terrible.

Just download Reaper. Unlimited free trial and very in-expensive licenses.

2. First of all, you need an audio interface to plug microphones into.

Get something like a Focusrite Sapphire Pro 24 or a Presonus Firebox. I like the Tascam US series interfaces, as they are good USB 2.0 intefaces (if you are going the USB route, keep in mind firewire is generally considered optimal).

To record guitar, get a SHURE SM57. Some like the SENNHEISER e609. This is of course if you have a good amp, and have the patience to learn how to mic an amp, and the post processing involved. You can also go DI in with the guitar, and use VST amp simulation. Just type this into google:

guide to vst amp simulation site:ultimate-guitar.com

To record bass, go DI. Some like to blend mic'd bass as well with DI'd tracks, but if you want cost effective, go DI. Your interface will have an instrument in, so just plug your bass into that.

3. Get a program such as Steven Slate Drums, Addictive Drums, or Superior Drummer. Others also like BFD by fxpansion.

Just program through midi.
Last edited by DIMEBAGLIVEDON at Jun 28, 2010,