#1
Just wondering what you guys think of which I should explore first Jazz or Blues guitar, I'll be using www.justinguitar.com to learn. They each have their own various techniques mainly used, but I don't know which I should start on.
#2
Start out with blues. It´s a way easier genre to learn. If you want to master jazz guitar you have to lock yourself in your basement for 10 years and practise non/stop.
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#3
Quote by conor-figgy
Just wondering what you guys think of which I should explore first Jazz or Blues guitar, I'll be using www.justinguitar.com to learn. They each have their own various techniques mainly used, but I don't know which I should start on.


Genres don't have techniques, genres have phrasing and idioms, technique is purely incidental to getting the right notes in the right place.

Either way, I think you should learn blues first, not because it's necessarily easier but because it's where a lot of the phrasing for most of the western world's music comes from these days, especially in guitar. It's also the easiest to jam with another player, if you want to jam with any other player on Earth just go with a blues in E and you should be fine.
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#4
Wrote a whole paragraph there and realised Zaphod said it all before me.
Blues, easier to explore theory wise and much, much more geared towards guitar than Jazz ever has been. The really interesting jazz guitar work tends to be very intensive anyway.
#5
Listen to a lot of both and decide which moves you more. There are plenty of great blues and jazz recordings on YouTube....

As the guys note, jazz guitar is an involved discipline. Just learning to play some of the standard repertoire might take years....
#6
Hey whats up dude. I am both a jazz guitarist and blues guitarist. I would learn blues first because that makes jazz feel like a breeze. However, advanced jazz guitar is not easy and will take a good year or two JUST to get the general idea of it. It will take a while to master it though. As far as your equipment goes, I would just use an amp and a guitar. Both your amp and guitar is good but you dont really need the wah wah pedal to play blues or jazz. Those styles do not require alot of effects. So practice hard dude. Also try to study artist in that genre.(B.B King, Buddy Guy, Eric Clapton,Stevie Ray Vaughn,etc.) For jazz, I would look up(Herbie Hancock, Miles Davis, Quincy Jones, Ray Charles, Duke Ellington, and etc.) For blues, you will use alot more feeling than alot of other styles. Blues does not require alot of fast shredding, but it will test your love and passion for music. Jazz guitar is alot like classical guitar, but with a little bit of a bluesy feel,(Even though blues came after jazz). You wont do alot of showing off in jazz AT ALL!!! Your main concern in jazz is working on some really weird and hard chords to play. Thats all I have to say so rock on and work hard!!
#7
Be honest now: do you listen to either genre? And I mean really listen to them.
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#8
Quote by StratMaster14
For blues, you will use alot more feeling than alot of other styles.


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#10
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Be honest now: do you listen to either genre? And I mean really listen to them.

Well no I don't, but I never said I did, but i'd like too, just trying to expand my music taste...
#11
Thank's guys! I really appreciate your views and knowledge, but special thanks to StratMaster14 and Zaphod_Beeblebr
#12
Quote by conor-figgy
Well no I don't, but I never said I did, but i'd like too, just trying to expand my music taste...

Then my advice would be to listen to both genres before trying to play them. Get familiar with the sound and the phrasing for a while and then try to emulate it with your instrument.
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#13
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Then my advice would be to listen to both genres before trying to play them. Get familiar with the sound and the phrasing for a while and then try to emulate it with your instrument.

Well I've delved slightly in blues already and I think I'll continue.....I have listened too much but I have listened to Gary Moore, Rory Gallagher, Chuck Berry and a little bit of T-Bone Walker....you agree with my current path of artists?
#14
Quote by conor-figgy
Well I've delved slightly in blues already and I think I'll continue.....I have listened too much but I have listened to Gary Moore, Rory Gallagher, Chuck Berry and a little bit of T-Bone Walker....you agree with my current path of artists?


All good but I'd say keep looking more into the history of the genre, you can't possibly understand where something is going or where it might go next without appreciating where it's come from. All the current masters of any given genre ALWAYS have a really strong grounding in the past of whatever they play.
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#15
I suggest you start with blues unless you're extremely passionate about Jazz. Jazz can be incredibly complicated, while a lot of the things you do on guitar are basically built right off blues. Blues all the way dude.
#16
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Genres don't have techniques, genres have phrasing and idioms, technique is purely incidental to getting the right notes in the right place.

Either way, I think you should learn blues first, not because it's necessarily easier but because it's where a lot of the phrasing for most of the western world's music comes from these days, especially in guitar. It's also the easiest to jam with another player, if you want to jam with any other player on Earth just go with a blues in E and you should be fine.


that made absolutely no sense.. technique is purely incidental to get the right notes in right place... and genres dont have techniques??? WOWW thats a first
#17
Quote by atl2maryland
that made absolutely no sense.. technique is purely incidental to get the right notes in right place... and genres dont have techniques??? WOWW thats a first

What part of that doesn't make any sense?

A genre does not intrinsically include a technique.
#18
I personally play jazz, and I'd say that it really comes from where you want to take your guitar experience, I wanted messed up phrasing, crazy progressions and chords extended beyound anything I'd ever seen before, so Jazz was right up my alley, if you desire to play something with alot of feeling, then I'd say go the Blues (which it seems you already have) Jazz does require a lot ( A whole lot) of discipline, hell I haven't played an open chord in the last 4 months, and have no desire to do so. All in all, its all about wherever you want to take your guitar experience.
#19
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#20
I prefer blues..

you just can't get as mean/funky/rude/dirty with jazz as you can with blues, sure some people might say it's a more simple form of music - but if you look at cats like Junior Watson, Kid Andersen, Sean Costello etc (relatively new guys) their blues is tinged with jazz, soul, rnb, funk, surf etc..

Blues is a very good starting point for all players IMO, and can be taken as far as you want:]
#22
I'd prefer to focus on one, and regarding the whole genres and techniques, i did not mean it like you only hear ____ in ______ , but I meant the techniques most frequently used in the genre, from what I know (please correct me if I'm wrong), that blues is characterised by using the minor pentatonic, blues scale etc. and bends, curling etc.... you'd know blues guitar to hear it....now feel free to correct me but please don't come saying ''wtf!!?? bending isn't only used in blues you idiot!!'', because I did say etc...
#23
As far as I know you're a beginner, so let me know if you aren't.
I just looked through the Blues and Jazz section on the website, and in all honesty, you should probably start out with learning blues. When learning blues, you aren't just settling for the standard Johnny B. Goode type stuff, nearly everything you play is built right off of blues. You will learn the positions of the pentatonic scale if you choose blues, which is built right off of the Major scale, so when you begin to learn more theory and learn the major scale it will be much easier if you already have knowledge of the blues/pentatonic scale.

Not only that, going with blues will be a lot easier to learn basic technique than jazz. Now I'm not saying that Jazz doesn't use technique, but it will be much more advanced than blues will be based on that website.


But yeah overall, from looking at the Blues & Jazz sections on that website, you should probably go with Blues before you even take a glimpse at the Jazz section.
#24
Quote by BgOslicK
As far as I know you're a beginner, so let me know if you aren't.

Wel I'm not a complete beginner, I know my major scale, minor pentatonic, blues scale, and I'm building up on theory, I know my open chords, power chords, barre chords, played a variety of music from Green Day to Slipknot etc...
#25
Oh. No offense, but this thread is completely irrelevant and a huge waste of time then. Go through the blues section, then go through the jazz section, or vise versa. The blues and jazz sections on his website are actually extremely brief and you'll get through both of them in less than a few hours. If you wanna focus on one genre over the other, then do whatever the hell you enjoy more.
Last edited by BgOslicK at Jun 28, 2010,
#26
Quote by BgOslicK
Oh. No offense, but this thread is completely irrelevant and a huge waste of time then.

Well it helped me so I wouldn't call it completely irrelevant but I get where you're coming from..... And I didn't take offence
#27
i say blues because with blues you can do anything with it. alot of funk, rock, alternative, punk, acoustic rock, ska, indie, shred and metal are very blues influenced.

im not at all a jazz player but from what iv experienced it has a lot weird time signatures, and chords, and craziness. if you learn both however you could do some crazy fusion genres that sound really weird and cool.
#28
This might have been said already, but jazz and blues are very closely related. A huge swathe of jazz is based on blues progressions. If you learn to play blues first, you'll have an easier time getting into jazz.

Here's what I think you should do:

1. Learn to play over simple blues progressions using the blues scale. Spend a lot of time exploring the blues and the use of the blues scale, in all positions.

2. Learn the basic dominant 7th arpeggio, and interchange playing that with the blues scale over the blues chord changes.

3. Learn the minor 7th arpeggio, again in all positions.

4. Find some jazz-blues progressions. Try using the blues scale and appropriate arpeggios to play over them.

5. Also learn the m7b5 arpeggio, and the diminished 7th arpeggio in all positions.

6. Add some chromatic notes to your arpeggios.

7. Put all this together and you'll be set.

Of course you may need to spend a lot of time listening to jazz and blues, doing a lot of reading about music theory, and looking up the terms I used above (if necessary) as you come to them, but if you do all this you'll have a great foundation for playing both blues and jazz.
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#30
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Genres don't have techniques, genres have phrasing and idioms, technique is purely incidental to getting the right notes in the right place.

Either way, I think you should learn blues first, not because it's necessarily easier but because it's where a lot of the phrasing for most of the western world's music comes from these days, especially in guitar. It's also the easiest to jam with another player, if you want to jam with any other player on Earth just go with a blues in E and you should be fine.


Agreed on all points. Blues gets you out the door and able to play with other people. jazz is worth studying, and is more intellectual music than the blues, but it can come second.
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