#1
I'm fairly new guitar player, and I only own one really quality guitar, a shecter damien 6. The damien is very rock/metal oriented and for about a month now I've been looking for a hollowbody that would allow me to expand my guitar vocabulary into the areas of jazz and blues. I've been playing jazz for a while on trombone, so I know the music, but when i began searching for an instrument to match the style, I found two different guitars that peaked my interest. The first was an Ibanez artcore AF75TDG, and the other was the Schecter corsair with a bigsby. Both seem like quality guitars, but I have only been able to try out the Ibanez in person. I likes it when I played it, but the reviews I'm reading for the Schecter are so glowing that I think I need to try it before I make my final decision. Does anyone have an opinion on either of the two guitars, or another hollowbody around that price range I should be looking at? And none of the music stores in my area have the schecter, is there a way to try before I buy?
#2
Quote by ChucklesMginty
IMO you can do better than a Schecter or Ibanez for a hollowbody.

What's your budget?


^this. Gretsch comes to mind, or Epiphone. Those Wild Kats are pretty nice for the price.

EDIT: after poking around a bit, the ibby is $500 and the schecter with a bigsby is around $750 (USD). big difference there. but for that price range, i urge you to play a gretsch 5120 before you buy anything else. sick guitar.
Last edited by bbetances at Jun 27, 2010,
#3
800 max, And I've been looking at those guitars because of the great reviews I've found for them online. The gibsons and gretch's I've found in my range seem overpriced for the quality of what you get.
#4
Quote by ChucklesMginty
IMO you can do better than a Schecter or Ibanez for a hollowbody.

What's your budget?



Idk man, I've played some Ibanez hollow bodies that just blew me out of the water. I've never seen a bad Ibanez guitar come to think of it.
#5
Are you trying to get a hollowbody or a semi-hollow body? Schecter only makes semi-hollows, Ibanez might make both.
#7
Quote by Iamthebaron
I'm looking for a guitar that is jazz oriented.


That Ibanez Art Series would work perfectly. My friend, as well as second guitarist in my youth band has the Ibanez Art Series solidbody electric guitar and I love the thing, tis a great guitar.
#8
The AF75 will do you just right as a Jazz, box. I own one, with a little coaxing it becomes really versatile. But at it's heart it's some smooth clean tones in it. Feedback can be a little problem when distorted, but it's manageable. Just make sure you try one first.
#9
You don't even need a semi-hollow or a fully hollow to play jazz. I played jazz with my Dean DBD T flawlessly. Granted I used an RP355 for a little bit, and a 120 Watt Roland Jazz Chorus...

Of course, there's also different styles of jazz guitar. Are you looking for a spanky, smooth/mellow, quacky, bright, biting or punchy kind of tone?

The best guitar that I can think of that would fit you perfectly would be the Schecter Solo Special. It's got a Ducan Design HB-102 (I think) in the bridge and a P100 in the neck, both are coil-tappable. You'll get any tone out of that guitar you want, really.

You'll also learn to roll the tone knob around to achieve certain jazzy tones.

On top of all that, you can use it for lots of 90's punk rock and some pretty modern rock as well. I wouldn't play hardcore with it, but it'll definitely play a lot of stuff.

http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Schecter-Guitar-Research-Solo6-Special-Electric-Guitar?sku=584536
#10
Quote by Iamthebaron
I'm looking for a guitar that is jazz oriented.


Go try some guitars if you can.
Don't rule out epiphones though, they really do make very good hollowbodies that are well worth playing first.
#11
I'd pass on the Ibanez. As for Schecter, I wasn't even aware they made hollow/semi-hollow guitars, which should say everything you need to know. Sure, there's a chance they could be decent guitars, but I'm willing to bet there's a reason for their lack of reputation in this area.

I definitely second the Gretsch G5120. Put on some flatwounds, set it to the neck pickup, roll down the tone knob, and you should be set. Yes, it's more expensive than the Ibanez or Schecter, but you're getting a much better quality instrument. I've played some nice instruments, including a 1959 Gibson L-7, and consider myself a bit of a snob. I have yet to find a flaw with my Gretsch; it sounds and feels like a much more expensive instrument. The only thing that really came close was a Gibson ES-335, and frankly I think the Gretsch had better playability to boot.

If you want something a bit more traditional, there's also the Gretsch Synchromatic series, which have a floating pickup (attached to the pickguard) and less flashy visual styling. The floating pickup also means you can play it as an acoustic, since there's nothing screwed into the top to dampen the sound.

I've also heard good things about the Godin 5th Avenue -- it's available as an acoustic, or with a single P-90 pickup, or with two P-90s and a cutaway. Might be a little outside your price range, but you can always save up a bit more.

EDIT: Epiphone's version of the ES-175 is also supposed to be pretty good (it's actually styled closer to the original than the Gibson Custom version). Never had a chance to play one myself, though. That model's generally considered the archetypal electric jazz guitar.
Last edited by obeythepenguin at Jun 27, 2010,
#12
Actually the Gretsch G5120 would be a little less money than the Schecter, and I've tried it and liked it fine. And I know that Schecter hasn't gained much of a reputation in the hollowbody guitar world, but everything I read online about that guitar praises excellent workmanship and great tone. The guitar center in my area has the Gretsch, I think I'll try it a little more extensively in the coming week.
#13
Quote by Iamthebaron
Actually the Gretsch G5120 would be a little less money than the Schecter, and I've tried it and liked it fine. And I know that Schecter hasn't gained much of a reputation in the hollowbody guitar world, but everything I read online about that guitar praises excellent workmanship and great tone. The guitar center in my area has the Gretsch, I think I'll try it a little more extensively in the coming week.

Be careful with reviews; people will always try to justify their purchase. (That includes everything I say too, of course.)

I was personally sold on the Gretsch as soon as I picked it up; everything about it just felt so right. But the best thing you can do is trust your own judgment. And if you have to, take your time with it -- I spent probably about a year or so searching for each of my instruments, although it wasn't so much actively looking as waiting for the right one to find me. Takes a bit of patience, but seems to have worked well so far...
#14
I've played the G5120, it's an excellent guitar for the price.

Personally, I'd go with the G5120 double cutaway. Little lighter, easier to improv solo

But still, Schecter Solo-6 Special, definitely something to check out. You seem to have totally ignored my post
#15
Quote by r0ckth3d34n
Personally, I'd go with the G5120 double cutaway. Little lighter, easier to improv solo

The G5122, you mean?
#16
Quote by obeythepenguin
The G5122, you mean?


Yes, I do. I'm pretty sure I was thinking G5122, and thinking about the differences between that and the G5120.

/brainfart

I like the walnut finish on the G5122 more than I like the orange, black and sunburst finishes, too.
#17
Quote by r0ckth3d34n
I like the walnut finish on the G5122 more than I like the orange, black and sunburst finishes, too.

Eh, I've always loved the Gretsch orange. It would look so silly if it weren't so damn classy.

Almost went with a G5122 myself, but they'd just gotten the G5120 when I went to try it, and I ended up liking that one better. Bit deeper body, and more comfortable string spacing for fingerstyle. Still not a bad guitar, the G5122, and if someone hadn't got to it first I'd probably have gotten that one too. (Just as well, though, 'cause that other store's still got my ES-335...)
#18
Haha sorry about ignoring the solo six, I've actually played that guitar, as Schecter has a place in my heart, but I don't really like the styling and I'm pretty set on having the hollowbody. And I do try to be wary about reviews, but seeing as how I haven't found a single negative one anywhere I look, it's probably a quality instrument. Does anyone have advice on where I could get my hands on one to try it out?
#19
Quote by Iamthebaron
Does anyone have advice on where I could get my hands on one to try it out?

If your store carries Schecter, just not that particular model, you could probably ask them to order one so you could try it out. Of course, that might mean you're locked into buying it whether you like it or not...
#20
I like the Gretsch orange, too. But since I have a choice in finishes, I'd totally go with the walnut finish.

@iamthebaron

Well I was hoping to steer your mind elsewhere so you know you don't have to have a (semi-) hollow body to play jazz.

Guitar Center has the G5120, not sure about the G5122. But call before you go. If they don't have it in stock, they might recommend you some over the phone.
#21
I would certainly try an Epi ES175 for that really mellow sound.
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#22
Quote by obeythepenguin
If your store carries Schecter, just not that particular model, you could probably ask them to order one so you could try it out. Of course, that might mean you're locked into buying it whether you like it or not...


Yeah, it's the same store where I got my Damien, and that's what I was afraid of. They'd be able to order it, but I don't know whether I could say no after they ordered it.
#23
Quote by Iamthebaron
Yeah, it's the same store where I got my Damien, and that's what I was afraid of. They'd be able to order it, but I don't know whether I could say no after they ordered it.

Ask them what their policy is. The worst that can happen is you have to find another way to try one out.

I'll also second Lurcher's suggestion to try the Epi ES-175. And @ r0ckth3d34n: you raise a good point, and I agree with you whole-heartedly, but I'll never miss an opportunity to talk someone into buying a (semi-)hollow. Things just exude class, and they aren't nearly as inherently screwed up as my other favorite instrument (hint: see sig)
#24
a epi dot studio or sheraton is the best bang for your buck.
use the extra money for a new set of pickups.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#25
I just picked up an ibanez artcore 86G TRD, my first hollow body for jazz - blues. after a setup and fresh strings it's easily my favorite guitar. Fantastic tone, a great buy. Check them out for sure before you buy.
#26
I don't own one, but I was considering an Artcore for quite a while. When I asked him, my guitar teacher was pretty impressed with the Artcore series. For the price, they give you quite a bit. (And even the high-end ones have their proponents- see George Benson.)

Gretsch guitars with a similar bodystyle will tent to be a bit deeper in the body, so will have more acoustic projection...and will cost a little more.

I can't speak to the Schecters, never tried one out.
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#27
I think i'm going to go to guitar center and ask if there's a way I can try the schecter, if not, I'll take a good look at the Gretsches, because I know they have them there.