#1
I was playing my Epiphone SG one day and it was hooked up to an RP250, into a 75 watt solid-state Peavey Bandit amp. Should've had fun with it like usual. But it didn't seem fun anymore after playing a friend's quality Fender Strat the day before hooked up to a Fender Twin Reverb tube amp, improvising some things on various scales. Everything vintage sounded so much better and exciting, so I decided to make an exciting change.

Since then I've sold my solid state amps, my knock-off guitars, effect pedals and bought myself a quality Gibson Hummingbird acoustic to give myself a better feel for the guitar while I save up for a quality Fender Stratocaster or Gibson Les Paul and a tube amp in the future. Marshall? Fender? Traynor? You recommend me something here, people. I don't know how long I'll be saving for, but I believe I made the right choice.

Has anybody else done something like this before? Got tired of the new cheap instruments and pedals with more digital effect tones rather than keeping it natural, and decided you wanted to go old school? People call me crazy for doing it, but when the day comes I get my lifetime gear, I'm sure I'll change a few opinions and influence them to do the same.
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#2
After searching the Gibson Hummingbird on GC that sounds kind of dumb. Because with that $2000 you could of gotton some good gear...
My Fav Guitarists
1) Jimi Hendrix
2) Stevie Ray Vaughan
3) Eric Clapton
4) Joe Satriani
5) Slash -If you see this slash PM me

"Blues is easy to play, but hard to feel" - Jimi Hendrix
#3
^+1

You prolly coulda gotten gear identical to your friend with that much.
Gibson SG Standard
Gibson Les Paul Traditional
Cort Explorer
Squire Standard Strat rebuilt with Fender USA parts
Squire Tele
Krank 1980
Orange Tiny Terror
Traynor YCV 50 Blue
Peavey Vypyr 75

Will fly for food. Call me Dylan
#4
You need to get over all this grass-is-greener crap and be happy with what you’ve got.
#5
I'm going with vintage sound, so I'll pocket my money until the day comes along I see a nicely owned quality guitar as well as tube amp. And what's the big deal of wanting to improve with my guitar playing using an acoustic before I step it up?
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Last edited by Woodfallman at Jun 27, 2010,
#6
i agree that sticking simple with gear is good less to breakdown on you
but why did you buy a hummingbird? when that money could of gone to upgrading your gear ALOT
#7
Quote by Woodfallman
I'm going with vintage sound, so I'll pocket my money until the day comes along I see a nicely owned quality guitar as well as tube amp. And what's the big deal of wanting to improve with my guitar playing using an acoustic before I step it up?


IMO, I feel limited to what I can play on an acoustic. I mean you can't really play some of your favorite bands that use electrics, solos are harder, you don't get to play around with effects as much. And with $2000... you can definitely buy some good gear.
My Fav Guitarists
1) Jimi Hendrix
2) Stevie Ray Vaughan
3) Eric Clapton
4) Joe Satriani
5) Slash -If you see this slash PM me

"Blues is easy to play, but hard to feel" - Jimi Hendrix
#8
I forgot to mention I rent a place with my friend and get access to play his guitar all the time.
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Last edited by Woodfallman at Jun 27, 2010,
#9
What kind of music do you play? Classic rock and blues?

If I were you, I would get a Suhr Badger 18 combo and a guitar with humbuckers that are coil splittable. That guitar would give you Les paul and Strat sounds and the Badger 18 is a superb classic rock and blues amp.
#10
Look at it this way, the guy obviously didn't like his gear so he decided to focus on acoustic and bought an expensive good quality guitar to last him a lifetime.

He isn't giving up on going electric again, but he's happy with his plan and I'm all for him!

While it is true that some things are harder on acoustic and that you could've bought some great gear for $2000, I think what you did was great. The Acoustic will strengthen your fingers and acoustics have a feel that electrics don't, and visa-versa (obviously!)

Put some pics of that bad boy up! I want to see him
Gear

Mesa/Boogie Mark V Head
Mills Acoustics Mach 212B
Peavey Vypyr 15w
ESP LTD EC-1000 guitar (BKP Nailbombs)
Fender American Standard Strat
PRS Custom 24
Dunlop KH Signature Wah
Menatone Red Snapper
Boss DD-7 Delay
Zvex Fuzz Factory
#11
People hating on a hummingbird have not played a hummingbird. Congrats on that TS, you are set as far as acoustics go for life, unless you decide at some point you need a Collings or 1920's Martin or something like that.
#12
Quote by rokket2005
People hating on a hummingbird have not played a hummingbird. Congrats on that TS, you are set as far as acoustics go for life, unless you decide at some point you need a Collings or 1920's Martin or something like that.


I'm not hating on the hummingbird I know its a great guitar... I'm just saying his main goal was to have good equipment like his friend, and he could of done that with $2000
My Fav Guitarists
1) Jimi Hendrix
2) Stevie Ray Vaughan
3) Eric Clapton
4) Joe Satriani
5) Slash -If you see this slash PM me

"Blues is easy to play, but hard to feel" - Jimi Hendrix
#13
The comments that you could have used the money that you spent on the acoustic to buy quality gear are correct, you could get a vintage Twin and vintage Strat for $2000.

However the Hummingbird is a very high quality acoustic guitar that sounds amazing, and so if you are happy with that, it's not like you've wasted your money, especially if you have access to your friends electric guitar. Congrats

Amp wise, if you play clean, blue, lightly distorted rock, then there is no better option than a Fender Twin in my opinion, you just wont beat it, for cleans and blues especially. So if you played one of those and you really liked it, and you don't play heavily distored music, you should go with that.

Guitar wise, a Strat and a Les Paul are completly different guitars, polar opposites infact. 9 times out of 10 a Strat will sound better through a Twin than an LP would, but an LP is obvioulsy better for certain things in most people's opinions. However, guitars are very personal things, you won't know what you want untill you hold it and play it, it's just about what you feel comfortable playing, you shouldn't tell you what to buy when it comes to guitars.

I think the fact that you sold your cheap gear for a new start is pretty cool
"In modern music, a lot of people are really stuck on the example, asif it were the idea. It takes millions of examples to articulate an idea, so don't get stuck on the f*cking example." - Joshua Homme, 2008.
#14
if you ever find yourself with 5k...
used les paul r8.

if you like mid gain + cleans
grab a used fuchs ods100

if you like high gain grab a slo 100

life problem solved.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#15
Kudos on the acoustic purchase. i think it may have made more sense to keep the money and do your research and find your dream electric setup with that money, becuase from the sounds of it that is what you really desire. however its a very mature decision to go back to bassics with vintage gear rather than continue with the digital and solid state equipment

i'm sure you made the right choice buying the acoustic, as in chances are you like acoustic music equally as well as electric i'd hope? however this is a good thing IMHO becuase you can train your fingers on a harder to play guitar, and when you find that perfect set up it will feel even smoother to you than it would to the quintesential electric man. so definately rock on with that hummingbird, and take it around with you practicing as much as you can.

as for a guitar, it is pretty tough to choose between a strat and a les paul because they are so different. you really struggle to find any middle ground between the two and it can make things difficult especially in the blues world. an LP has a much higher output signal, but old PAF's like you'd want are very round and mellow with a great jazzy touch to your blues. with a strat you can crank up the amp a little higher and let it rip well being heard. the strat is far less of a subtle instrument comparatively, whereas the LP can sit nicely in various situations without sounding too flashy. all of this being respective to the blues nature, not more modern high gain tones, i'm talking clean twin reverb here.

if you want something in between that can lean on both guitars, look for a used 70's les paul junior dual P90 :] they have a very different look that is more unique and yet still recognizable. as for tone there is les body mass, so it is more strat like in airy qualities. pickup wise the P90s will react much more to knob tweaks on the guitar and can lean on both bright and flashy strat tones with the volume down and the tone up, but be powerfull, warm and round with the tone down and the volume up.

amp wise it really depends on the requirement of use. a lot of fender amps sound like a lot of fender amps with the main difference being wattage and speakers. ala deluxe reverb, vibrolux reverb, and twin reverb. talking blackface of course, the deluxe will be great for pushing the output tubes in studios and small clubs without breaking anyones ears... too bad at least. the twin is a nice clean untill 10 kind of amp, or atleast clean untill you dont want it to get any louder. wheras the vibrolux is in the middle of the two. you can play live at clubs and studios with just a touch of hair in the poweramp, or if you are playing large venues without a PA system for some odd reason, the amp distorts very pleasently around half volume :]

however the vibrolux is a tricky amp to find just right, there are a few reissue versions all to themselves. the custom vibroverb has no negative feedback loop and causes much earlier break up, there is another option of which its name i cant recall, but it has a selectable tube/SS rectifier for increased headroom, and a boost by removing the vibrato circuit. there is also the 65 reissue which is almost to spec with blackface amps, but has a SS rectifier for more headroom and faster reponse. and the gold old vintage blackface if you can find/afford it.
If you don't talk to your kids about GAS, who will?
#16
I did the same thing as you and it was a smart choice. Sold my cheep gear and saved up just using my acoustic in the mean time and ended up getting a fender bassman and a marshall cab. Even with that though im always wanting better gear.
#17
Quote by AGAINSTMEandyou
I did the same thing as you and it was a smart choice. Sold my cheep gear and saved up just using my acoustic in the mean time and ended up getting a fender bassman and a marshall cab. Even with that though im always wanting better gear.


Everyone will always want 'better' gear, no matter what gear you have. It's a disease

I think giving up playing electric for a while whilst you wait for new gear is a good thing, inface for the last few months, I've only really played acoustic, and my fingers are noticably stronger.
"In modern music, a lot of people are really stuck on the example, asif it were the idea. It takes millions of examples to articulate an idea, so don't get stuck on the f*cking example." - Joshua Homme, 2008.
#18
Thanks everybody, it's nice to see that some people are on the same page with me. I thought for a moment everybody was out of their minds and thought I was making the "wrong decision". I'll try to snap a picture of my acoustic guitar sometime soon, my brother's graduation is tonight so the camera is going to be in use for some time.

I used to play Alice in Chains and Soundgarden, still my favorite bands, but it's not music I want to play anymore. I want to be able to play songs that are based solely on improvisation when it comes to the solos or just jamming, and the Allman Brothers Band as well as blues and jazz gives me that freedom to do that. I'm determined to get a nice guitar tone out of vintage instruments and make them sound good with honest and soulful playing, something I just cannot get out of most gear I have had and have played.
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#19
Congrats, TS, you'll never need an acoustic again. Acoustic guitars are the gorgeous women of guitars, electrics are the dirty girls. You'll have that acoustic your whole life and likely pass it down to your son/daughter/robotslave someday, so that purchase should never be looked down upon.

That said, I think you're putting too much emphasis on vintage gear and all that mojo. Have you played many mid-range guitar/amp set ups? I have a feeling that you felt the huge difference from your cheap gear to some vintage quality stuff, but you will still feel a huge difference with just some mid-range stuff. Try out a Twin Reverb Reissue. Try out a modern American Strat. I'm not saying there aren't reasons why vintage is better, I'm just saying that just about anything will be an upgrade from your previous set up.

You seem to be a patient guy, which will help you greatly. Don't get caught up in the 'schools of thought' of guitar gear, meaning don't assume vintage is better, don't assume tube is better, don't assume American is better. Try things out and see what you like, keep an open mind. If a year from now you've been playing as much gear as you can and trying things out, but still haven't bought anything you'll be ready to make an educated purchase that will last you a lifetime. If you just run out and buy something now, a year from now you'll be shopping again.

This situation is why I put this quote in my sig: 'A map is not the territory.' Translated: 'Spoken or written word about how an amp sounds is not how the amp sounds.'
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Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#20
I've only read the first post, so I'm pretty sure that everyone else must be saying what I'm about to say...

...If you want nice electric gear, why did you spend $2000 on a ****ing acousitc?!?!?!?
Quote by rmr024
Well, in California, people carry around devices that control the minds of bears. So expect to see people walking their bears.

Also, don't be surprised if some robot hookers try to solicit sex to you on the streets.
#21
Quote by SLonergan
I've only read the first post, so I'm pretty sure that everyone else must be saying what I'm about to say...

...If you want nice electric gear, why did you spend $2000 on a ****ing acousitc?!?!?!?


Quality.
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#22
Quote by RocknRory
Look at it this way, the guy obviously didn't like his gear so he decided to focus on acoustic and bought an expensive good quality guitar to last him a lifetime.

He isn't giving up on going electric again, but he's happy with his plan and I'm all for him!

While it is true that some things are harder on acoustic and that you could've bought some great gear for $2000, I think what you did was great. The Acoustic will strengthen your fingers and acoustics have a feel that electrics don't, and visa-versa (obviously!)

Put some pics of that bad boy up! I want to see him


This is true. A good acoustic guitar like that will last forever.
#23
I really loved my friends Corvette, so I sold my Volkswagon and bought a Mercedes. Do you guys have any advice?
#24
Quote by fly135
I really loved my friends Corvette, so I sold my Volkswagon and bought a Mercedes. Do you guys have any advice?


Let me fix that. "So I sold my Volkswagon, and had enough money to buy a Corvette, but bought a Mercedes so that I could get a better feel for driving."
Quote by rmr024
Well, in California, people carry around devices that control the minds of bears. So expect to see people walking their bears.

Also, don't be surprised if some robot hookers try to solicit sex to you on the streets.