#1
What is the best, most effeciant and easiest way to remember guitar scales?
Prog <3
#2
learning and practicing them. that's it. after a while you begin to become more in sync with your guitar and begin to make solo's and such.
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#3
i like to make my scales into vertical pattens (sweeps) you dont have to be good at sweep picking but having a horizontal understanding as well as a vertical understanding always helps me not repeat myself too often
#4
Quote by ScalesOfDoom
What is the best, most effeciant and easiest way to remember guitar scales?


utilize them in context ...... play music with them & listen.
shred is gaudy music
#5
Quote by GuitarMunky
utilize them in context ...... play music with them & listen.
Exactly. Try just jamming on a scale for a while or something. Maybe record a backing track and just noodle on the scale for a while.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#6
Quote by GuitarMunky
utilize them in context ...... play music with them & listen.


yeah, basically.

best - completely subjective
easiest - patterns
most efficient - actually knowing the notes
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#7
^ What I'm saying is that if you learn to hear and understand scales in a musical context, you truly begin to know them. They become more than a pattern on the neck, or formula in a theory book. They become something that you can utilize.

To me the usual advice of "learn the notes on the neck 1st".... and then "learn the scale formulas" is fine, but on it's own, is no different than learning the "box shapes". Without the context, without listening, all you have is a formula/pattern.

So IMO truly learning a scale must include being able to hear it, as well as recognizing it in the context of music. Learning the "box shapes" and the theory are both part of the process. Tie those in with contextual utilization and you're all set IMO.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 27, 2010,
#8
In my opinion, to 'know' a scale ultimately means being able to use it musically. I think that would mean being able to play freely in the scale without feeling like you have to think about the fingering and construction of the scale.

But, I think that before that can happen, it helps to really get the scale down physically. For me, I always learn two fingerings for any new scale I'm working on, one with the root note on the sixth string, and one with the root note on the fifth string. First, I get each of those so I know them in one position. Then, when I have that, I take each fingering and play it on frets 3-12, just getting it so I really know how to physically play the scale anywhere. Then, I do the typical ascending/descending cascading in 4 note pattern on frets 3-12 with each version of the scale.

By the time that's all done, I have a pretty good physical knowledge of the scale. Then, I spend a lot of time improvising and trying to find melodies in it, etc.

Anyway, that's just something that works for me!