#1
I played guitar for about 4-5 years and stopped because I was too impatient and lazy to do what it took to keep making progress. Now 4 years after quitting, I've started playing again and thankfully have learned a great deal more patience and am not lazy anymore. Guess thats mostly thanks to the military. Before I quit I was trying to learn theory like scales, pentatonic scales, and the like. But I couldn't memorize that stuff for the life of me. And in my futile attempts at learning it I burned myself out because I couldn't get it down and it just bored the hell out of me. But now I've gotten the cob webs out and learned a few songs that I would have never had the patience for before. I play a lot of metal/rock and will get into blues a little down the line, and my main focus is on learning to solo well so I'm now again at the point where I need to learn the scales, general theory, and how it all fits together.
I'm sorry for the life story, but can someone please give me a list of what I need to learn in order. Like basic scales then move on to... I really need to take the time to learn this stuff to get where I want to be as a guitar player, but hopefully I can get it down this time and not get bored with it in the process. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. Again, sorry for long story of how things came to be.
#2
well first learn the major scale and its formula wwhwwwh, where w=2 frets and h=1 fret, then minor where you flat the third, and harmonic minor where you flat the third and sixth, these are the most commonly used scales for rock and metal learn the horizontal patterns first then learn their vertical patterns the just improv with some chords
#3
Quote by M' BALZ ES-HARI
I played guitar for about 4-5 years and stopped because I was too impatient and lazy to do what it took to keep making progress. Now 4 years after quitting, I've started playing again and thankfully have learned a great deal more patience and am not lazy anymore. Guess thats mostly thanks to the military. Before I quit I was trying to learn theory like scales, pentatonic scales, and the like. But I couldn't memorize that stuff for the life of me. And in my futile attempts at learning it I burned myself out because I couldn't get it down and it just bored the hell out of me. But now I've gotten the cob webs out and learned a few songs that I would have never had the patience for before. I play a lot of metal/rock and will get into blues a little down the line, and my main focus is on learning to solo well so I'm now again at the point where I need to learn the scales, general theory, and how it all fits together.
I'm sorry for the life story, but can someone please give me a list of what I need to learn in order. Like basic scales then move on to... I really need to take the time to learn this stuff to get where I want to be as a guitar player, but hopefully I can get it down this time and not get bored with it in the process. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. Again, sorry for long story of how things came to be.


A good theory book will do that for you.

I've heard "music theory for dummies" is a good book to start with. Plenty others out there as well.
shred is gaudy music
#4
I think the first thing you should "learn" is the notes of the fretboard. Whether that means memorizing every single note or simply learning a method to find notes, I think it's a pretty essential skill. Just make sure you're still learning songs and stuff while you do this. Once you are pretty comfortable with the fretboard, you can move on to intervals and how they work in chords and scales, and then how chords work in chord progressions and how scales work in context, as well as how to alter scales in context or use certain types of chromaticism.

That should keep you busy for a while. If you need more direction, don't hesitate to ask. There's a lot of information out there which you may or may not be willing to weed through to find what you need.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#5
if you want more ideas play just lead in general that you could incorporate into solo ideas check this page out ..... i started out learning the minor and pentatonic scales ... now im having to go back to the minor ... its just a pain for me i would do it first while you have some interest in it.... and maybe just looking at the chromatic scale, studying the intervals and know the major scale is derived from it ... check out the music theory cipher for guitar (Blumbergs)
#7
I know I'm in the minority here, but I think the best thing to learn first is all the open and barre chords. I say this because once you know all the major/minor chords you have the ability to play the majority of songs, and also write your own. It also gives a good foundation to figure out notes.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#8
Ok, thx for the advice. I think what i'm gonna do is memorize the fretboard first of all. Then move on to the scales. I've got an alright amount of chords memorized. Gonna have to go over them but I know I got all the "cowboy" chords down at least. Then should I guess I'll move onto the major scales and then minor. Sound about right? Thats gonna keep me quite busy for a while. Like food1010 said I'm gonna keep learnin songs at the same time or I'll burn myself out again which is what I'm trying to avoid. Then when I get that down, if I'm not sure where to go next then I'll come back with more questions. And thx for the advice. I really appreciate it.
#9
Quote by AlanHB
I know I'm in the minority here, but I think the best thing to learn first is all the open and barre chords. I say this because once you know all the major/minor chords you have the ability to play the majority of songs, and also write your own. It also gives a good foundation to figure out notes.

why are you the minority here? most of the ppl i know who do play started out this way.... how do others?? and its easy to learn triads for a second guitar part if you know the notes in the Chords... then arpeggios... and list could go on...
#10
Quote by AlanHB
I know I'm in the minority here, but I think the best thing to learn first is all the open and barre chords. I say this because once you know all the major/minor chords you have the ability to play the majority of songs, and also write your own. It also gives a good foundation to figure out notes.
Actually that's great advice. This is pretty much what I did first. My first (and only, I guess) lesson was my mom teaching me a few open chords so I could learn some songs. This started it all. Learning chords helps you learn the fretboard incredibly well. If you get a note and you aren't sure what the note is, you can ask yourself, "If I built a barre chord (or whatever) off of this note, what would it be called?" It may not be all that much fun to you, but learning A LOT of chord-songs will really help your knowledge of the fretboard.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#12
Quote by food1010
It may not be all that much fun to you, but learning A LOT of chord-songs will really help your knowledge of the fretboard.


Hopefully that's not directed towards me - I also sing so chords are my friend

I played nothing but chords for my first year of guitar, so I find it weird that some people jump straight into scales and solos without learning chords first.

As for "chord songs", every song technically is a "chord song". Just pick anything you hear off the radio and try to learn it ALL. If you have any specific requests for songs, go to the suggest me a song thread above.

Edit: The "learning chords" thing can be a minority view because there is a growing view amongst beginner guitarists that chords = noob, solos = awesome. Therefore go straight to solos, don't be a noob with chords.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#13
I'm just saying that personally, I dont pay much attention to chords. I've learned a lot of them at one point at it will take a 10 min look over to get them again. Like most people, I didnt have what u call formal training of any kind when I started. If I heard a song that sounded cool, I learned it. Now, I can play most songs from nirvana to pantera. I just need to learn theory to help me progress and help to create my own music cuz playing other peoples music gets old after a while. And for future reference, here is a link to what seems like a pretty good way to learn the fretboard. I say what seems like because I havent tried it yet. http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_forum/uploads/post-1167-1192068497.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/guitar-lessons/89342-useful-method-learning-guitar-neck-notes.html&h=286&w=900&sz=158&tbnid=S4yvIt8lwUH7yM:&tbnh=46&tbnw=146&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dguitar%2Bfretboard%2Bnotes&hl=en&usg=__1uhw-zZMruFnAmx7_tha04KSMZU=&sa=X&ei=PAUoTM6lBcP38AbN-IDZBA&ved=0CDYQ9QEwCA
Last edited by M' BALZ ES-HARI at Jun 27, 2010,
#14
Quote by AlanHB
Hopefully that's not directed towards me - I also sing so chords are my friend
Oh no, not really. More so towards TS (or in general, any aspiring musician).

I'm with you there. This is getting off topic, but the other day my brother brought up the topic of what's more fun: rhythm or lead? Thinking on the topic, I came to the realization that I have a lot of fun doing rhythm. Lead is great, but rhythm is the skeleton of the song, it's what drives it forward. Lead may be the icing on the cake, but rhythm is the substance, the body of the music. Plus, like you said, playing rhythm and singing is awesome

Quote by AlanHB
I played nothing but chords for my first year of guitar, so I find it weird that some people jump straight into scales and solos without learning chords first.
I think I did a lot of everything at the beginning of my journey, just to try it out; but I must say, learning chords/chord-songs is what really helped me to develop as a musician. Like I said, it was my foundation; I learned a few chords from my mom, and it all took off from there.

Quote by AlanHB
As for "chord songs", every song technically is a "chord song". Just pick anything you hear off the radio and try to learn it ALL. If you have any specific requests for songs, go to the suggest me a song thread above.
Exactly. Some songs don't lend themselves as well as others to "strumming along," but you definitely have a good point.

Quote by M' BALZ ES-HARI
I'm just saying that personally, I dont pay much attention to chords. I've learned a lot of them at one point at it will take a 10 min look over to get them again. Like most people, I didnt have what u call formal training of any kind when I started. If I heard a song that sounded cool, I learned it.
That's not necessarily the worst way to learn. In fact, that's pretty much the extent of what I did for a while. I would be listening to music and say "I want to learn this song" and I would. Of course, I STUDY music now, but my foundation was built off of purely learning songs.

Quote by M' BALZ ES-HARI
Now, I can play most songs from nirvana to pantera. I just need to learn theory to help me progress and help to create my own music cuz playing other peoples music gets old after a while.
Exactly. Music theory (although it is the STUDY of music) is like learning grammar and vocabulary; it helps you express your ideas and thoughts through previous accumulated knowledge and experience.

Quote by M' BALZ ES-HARI
Well, it's certainly a good reference but you're gonna need some sort of method. You can't just stare at that chart for hours on end hoping it sinks in.

As we were saying, learning these chords/chord-songs helps you learn these notes through simple recognition. Say you just learned a song that uses the chords C G Am F (generic example for kicks - all open chords/basic barre chords) and you come across the note on the third fret of the fifth string, you should recognize this as a C, because it is the root of the C chord that the song used.

Some people try to simply memorize the chart, but I think it's a waste of time and will cause unneeded stress in your brain. Take it in stride. Learn reference points, memorize where the natural notes are, learn merely the musical alphabet and the open strings, whatever. Remember you can always "count up" from a note you know. If you're just starting and you know nothing you can always count up from the open string.

That's pretty much how I did it. I never "memorized" anything for the sake of memorizing it. I learned chord songs and then used my knowledge of the musical alphabet to "count up the fretboard" to determine what other notes were. As I progressed, more and more of these "reference points" were added to my vocabulary simply through recognition.

One more little tool: Once you know where one note is, you know where it occurs everywhere else on the fretboard. You know that little trick for tuning that if you match the 5th fret of one string to the next open string, they should end up at the same pitch. You also have your "octave rules" as I like to call them; 12 frets up is an octave, as is 7 frets up and one string up, 2 frets up and two strings up, 3 frets down and three strings up. Just bear in mind the B string is tuned to a major third (four frets) above the G string compared to the other strings which are tuned a perfect fourth apart (five frets). This throws things off a bit (but not irreparably, it's only a one fret difference).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jun 27, 2010,
#15
heres my cents ...every guitarist should know how to play these chords http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/music_styles/heavy_f--ing_metal_part_3.html in the barre chord sec. (this can even teach one how to do some arpeggios using the notes that make up those chords ..
on top of these i would say a guitarist should know how to play 9chords and 11chords so they can make a chord progression that expresses who they are ... how are you going to know if you like 11's chords if you don't try them in your.
then make a recorded chord progression and play lead over it and you have a original composition. lead-like triads at first then learn how arpeggios are played over chords and then i think your ready to learn scales and start soloing.. i played mainly rhythm guitar for bout 3 yrs its got way boring and then something clicked i could use box positions...
and if you paid attention to what notes you were playing when holding all your chords. then the step up to lead will be easier WAY...... with me i have to go back and take D for ex. i have to know its made up of D F#A and find every where i can play those notes to get different vocings...and now im looking at inversions taking D F# A moving to F# A D then to A F#D ..... then after that lesson im going to look at chord progressions and how to tension, ect. finally (i think) is going to be harmonize chords then im ready to pick back up on lead and explore modes more and worry about my melodic control(nice vids on youtube bout this) then i think im band ready .. i hope someone gets something from this