#1
Where do the chords come from in the bridge of "Fly By Night" by Rush? The chords are D major, F major, G major, C, major, D major, A minor, B minor, and G Major in that order. Also, in the main riff, there is a G minor chord, where does that come from?
#4
Just listened to the song. For a start the main riff is in D major, there are some borrowed chords here and there but nothing so big to suggest anything else.

The bridge appears to be in A minor, with a borrowed D major probably to link it to the rest of the song. When the bridge ends, back to D major.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
I'm not sure, the second part of the bridge is definitely in A minor, but D definitely sounds tonic in the first part(first part being, D major, F major, G major, C major, D major. Second part being A minor to G major.)
#6
Quote by WalrusNutFart
I'm not sure, the second part of the bridge is definitely in A minor, but D definitely sounds tonic in the first part(first part being, D major, F major, G major, C major, D major. Second part being A minor to G major.)


Yeah sounds about right. But if you know this, what's the question again?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#8
Quote by WalrusNutFart
Well if the first part is in the key of D, then where do the F major and C major come from?


They're just random chords inserted in to sound cool. Although they technically aren't in the key of D, that doesn't mean you can't stick those chords in, or any others if you wish.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#9
Quote by WalrusNutFart
Well if the first part is in the key of D, then where do the F major and C major come from?
They are borrowed from D minor.

Edit: More detailed analysis to follow in a minute. Gotta type it out.

So you have D F G C D Am Bm G (I bIII IV bVII I v vi IV)

The first chord, D, is the tonic.
It moves to the F (borrowed from the parallel minor key, D minor); I bIII is a common movement in blues/rock/pop music and everything in between.
This F then moves to a G, which is the IV (it's diatonic); I bIII IV is also every common.
The next chord, C, can be looked at in two contexts - as a dominant movement from G, but also as a borrowed chord from the parallel minor.
D, tonic.
Am, this ones a bit odd. I guess you could say this is a key change, likely to G, which is a basic modulation, as the two keys share 6 out of 7 notes (although I haven't listened to it so I can't be sure if it is in fact G).
If the key change is to G, then the last chords are diatonic, so that's rather simple.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jun 27, 2010,
#10
Quote by food1010
They are borrowed from D minor.

Edit: More detailed analysis to follow in a minute. Gotta type it out.


Yeah that too :P
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#11
Quote by food1010
They are borrowed from D minor.

Edit: More detailed analysis to follow in a minute. Gotta type it out.

So you have D F G C D Am Bm G (I bIII IV bVII I v vi IV)

The first chord, D, is the tonic.
It moves to the F (borrowed from the parallel minor key, D minor); I bIII is a common movement in blues/rock/pop music and everything in between.
This F then moves to a G, which is the IV (it's diatonic); I bIII IV is also every common.
The next chord, C, can be looked at in two contexts - as a dominant movement from G, but also as a borrowed chord from the parallel minor.
D, tonic.
Am, this ones a bit odd. I guess you could say this is a key change, likely to G, which is a basic modulation, as the two keys share 6 out of 7 notes (although I haven't listened to it so I can't be sure if it is in fact G).
If the key change is to G, then the last chords are diatonic, so that's rather simple.



Thanks so much!

If a minor, b minor and g major aren't taken from G, then I guess the a minor could come from d minor, and the b minor and g major could come from d major, which be another likely place they could come from. Thanks again!