#1
at our last band practice we went over our songs, and added a new one to our menu. after practicing these for two days in a row (most of the day, we basically live at our practice space) i decided just to record us practicing and get an idea of where we are realistically, to where we should be in my mind and where i feel we need to be before progressing further. the recording sounded very loose, are there any specific ways to work with everyone on getting a tighter sound? or really anything we should worry about that could be causing the extreme looseness in the demo;s. thanks.
Quote by herby190
When I saw that, I thought of musical notes.... my elementary school teachers taught them as "tee-tees" "ta-tas" and a bunch of other nonsense....
#2
Since when do you add songs to your 'menu'? :P

How are you currently recording your music?
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#3
"Looseness" is usually caused by either the band members not being familiar with the material, or not listening to eachother and all playing separate lines at the same time rather than playing with the other members of the group.

So first, the members should know the songs so well that they don't even have to think about them. Eventually you should get to the point where you're almost "bored" of playing them, and it's muscle memory driving your part.

Secondly, identify if certain parts are always loose, or whether it's the entire song in general. If it's always the same part, work on those parts, break each part down and identify why it sounds loose. If it's the entire song, really listen to eachother, and how your parts interact with others.

You may also want to think about why you could only hear the looseness after it was recorded, rather than while you were playing the songs. This indicates that you should listen more, as I pointed out.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#4
eh, to our "list". and we were using my ipod with an ipod mic, we know a guy who has professional recording equipment and will let us record, these demos were just to get an idea of how we sound.
Quote by herby190
When I saw that, I thought of musical notes.... my elementary school teachers taught them as "tee-tees" "ta-tas" and a bunch of other nonsense....
#5
Quote by AlanHB
"Looseness" is usually caused by either the band members not being familiar with the material, or not listening to eachother and all playing separate lines at the same time rather than playing with the other members of the group.

So first, the members should know the songs so well that they don't even have to think about them. Eventually you should get to the point where you're almost "bored" of playing them, and it's muscle memory driving your part.

Secondly, identify if certain parts are always loose, or whether it's the entire song in general. If it's always the same part, work on those parts, break each part down and identify why it sounds loose. If it's the entire song, really listen to eachother, and how your parts interact with others.

You may also want to think about why you could only hear the looseness after it was recorded, rather than while you were playing the songs. This indicates that you should listen more, as I pointed out.


we practice at my drummers, in his basement, with the way we have it EQ'd theres no way i'll be able to tell anything by listening.
Quote by herby190
When I saw that, I thought of musical notes.... my elementary school teachers taught them as "tee-tees" "ta-tas" and a bunch of other nonsense....
#6
Quote by Ir a+infinitive
we practice at my drummers, in his basement, with the way we have it EQ'd theres no way i'll be able to tell anything by listening.


Not sure what you're hinting at. What's the "looseness" you're describing if it doesn't mean "instruments not in sync with each other".

If you really cannot hear each other, play quieter.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
we have it EQ'd as quiet as we can according to the sound of the drums.

the looseness is...well ill post them quick if you wouldnt mind downloading them?
Quote by herby190
When I saw that, I thought of musical notes.... my elementary school teachers taught them as "tee-tees" "ta-tas" and a bunch of other nonsense....
#8
Quote by Ir a+infinitive
we have it EQ'd as quiet as we can according to the sound of the drums.

the looseness is...well ill post them quick if you wouldnt mind downloading them?


Sure, upload them to your profile.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
Ok here goes;

Demo 1; Sounds like you guys are chasing eachother all over the place. The guitar goes a little out of sync, the drums catch up, the bass slows down, both slow down. Nobody is playing in time basically. As each new section of the song happens, everyone gets confused and tries to gel again. I'd use the word "messy" instead of "loose" but it the same thing.

Demo 5; The drums speed up at the start, and then slow down again, putting everyone off. Actually, constantly changing tempo. I think it goes on the entire song. The drummer is just trying to be clever with his fills so is constantly changing tempo. It sounds like he's never heard the song before. It's actually quite comical.

So there you go, general timing issues and confused drummer. The drummer is a lot more obvious in demo 5. Listen just to the drums - it's not hard because they're the loudest thing in the mix
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
thanks for your help, have a good one.
Quote by herby190
When I saw that, I thought of musical notes.... my elementary school teachers taught them as "tee-tees" "ta-tas" and a bunch of other nonsense....
#12
Quote by AlanHB
Ok here goes;

Demo 1; Sounds like you guys are chasing eachother all over the place. The guitar goes a little out of sync, the drums catch up, the bass slows down, both slow down. Nobody is playing in time basically. As each new section of the song happens, everyone gets confused and tries to gel again. I'd use the word "messy" instead of "loose" but it the same thing.

Demo 5; The drums speed up at the start, and then slow down again, putting everyone off. Actually, constantly changing tempo. I think it goes on the entire song. The drummer is just trying to be clever with his fills so is constantly changing tempo. It sounds like he's never heard the song before. It's actually quite comical.

So there you go, general timing issues and confused drummer. The drummer is a lot more obvious in demo 5. Listen just to the drums - it's not hard because they're the loudest thing in the mix
Hey... I'm the mentioned drummer...

Thanks for this, honestly; I was having a lot of trouble with this today, for some reason.... I don't know what caused me to speed up.... if it was the extreme fatigue I had at the time combined with chemicals trying to pick me back up, or just not paying attention to the feel of the song.... there was a lot more going on than I can explain.... it's no excuse though, my performance is, honestly, dreadful.

I'm going to have to practice this, slower.... also, I'm hoping it will be easier with the bassist actually being present.... we had to have the guitar fill in for a couple bass parts, and.... that didn't work for me so well....

I'll listen through 1 quickly, and I'll see what I need to work on.
#13
That's cool guys. Drummer - just remember to get a bit more familiar with the beat before chucking in all those crazy fills and stuff. And yeah, bassist present would be handy.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#14
Record everything, the whole rehearsal, warts and all. Then give everyone a copy of the recording.

If what they hear sounds too loose to them, (which it probably will if it does to you) they'll concentrate more on playing tighter next time
#15
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Record everything, the whole rehearsal, warts and all. Then give everyone a copy of the recording.

If what they hear sounds too loose to them, (which it probably will if it does to you) they'll concentrate more on playing tighter next time



i am liking this idea, thank you.
Quote by herby190
When I saw that, I thought of musical notes.... my elementary school teachers taught them as "tee-tees" "ta-tas" and a bunch of other nonsense....
#16
Oh I'd like to also say that I still stand by my first points - you guys should be listening to eachother more. It's probably really obvious that the drums were wrong now that I pointed it out, but you should know while you're actually playing the songs. It's not just the drums either - the guitar changes timing a lot too. Practice being more aware of the actual sound that's being created by the interaction of the instruments, rather than just your part.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#17
SO much of your band's "tightness" depends on your drummer. He is the clock that everyone follows. If the clock keeps speeding up and slowing down - barring the whole rest of the band being psychic - who in the world will be able to anticipate when and how much it will speed up and slow down... and for how long? You can't.

Your clock needs to be perfectly steady. When it is, it is *easy* to follow. Like a digital watch, the timing is perfectly predictable.

Solution: drummer needs to practice with *something* in perfect time, all the time. It *could* be a metronome, but could also be tracks that are so perfectly steady that they were recorded to a click.

CT
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