#1
Hey all, I've recently been reminded of a problem I used to have and never really figured it out, so, I'm here now.

Anyways, I used to have speed problems and could never learn riffs and parts of solo's properly up to speed and that's when I was told by many people to learn it slow and speed it up. However, I've had no success with this at all. It seems whenever I do this I have problems. I mean, I can slow it down and work it up to speed but because I slow it down I never learn the proper rhythm of it. For example, I used the video below to learn one of my favorite solos, I practiced it just like the video shows, in slow motion, but never got the hang of it when I play it to speed. It doesn't sound right, you know?

Basically, what I'm trying to say is, how can I use the whole slow it down until you're comfortable with speeding it up process, but still be able to get the rhythm?
I seriously am having problems here.

Edit: Forgot to add the video, here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_M9yLq0Ivk

I'm still having problems with part 4.
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Last edited by unicornfist at Jun 28, 2010,
#3
i dunno what level you're at, but it might have something to do with your level of ear training. with time, as you listen to music with a greater ear for detail and the technical aspect behind it all, it becomes easier to play a phrase in your head (with every detail intact), and it'll obviously be easier to translate that to physical playing.

kind of like if i asked you to memorize this sentence and repeat it back to me, you'd have no problem. but if i gave you a sentence in a language you didn't know, and just asked you to spit the same sounds back at me, it'd be considerably harder.
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Last edited by vIsIbleNoIsE at Jun 28, 2010,
#4
Well David Gilmour solos rely entirely on the timing of the notes. so its imperative that you know the solo backward and forwards. It is good to start slow and gradually speed up, and when you're playing that solo there is a great underlying beat to it that should keep you on track. Don't be frustrated if you don't get it right away. There's a reason Gilmour is a master! His solos are difficult in terms of timing and precision.
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#6
Quote by robhc
Have you been using metronome?

+1 When you practice it at slower speeds the rhythm should be the same, just at a slower tempo. Play it the same way you would at faster speeds - same fret hand fingers, up/down strokes, rhythm, etc.
#7
A lot of people recommend the "slow down, then speed it up" method, but honestly I think it's frequently a poor way to learn. I would suggest learning easier music up to speed, getting a command of the instrument, and THEN trying to play whatever it is you can't currently play at tempo.

Way too many guitarists spend way too much time playing advanced material at half speed when they have no real hope of playing it well (or at all) at full tempo. That's atotal waste - it gets you no closer to playing anything.

Start worrying about what you CAN play, and get out and play that rather than worrying about what you CAN'T play. Over time, what you can play will expand.
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Last edited by Even Bigger D at Jun 28, 2010,
#8
Quote by Even Bigger D
A lot of people recommend the "slow down, then speed it up" method, but honestly I think it's frequently a poor way to learn. I would suggest learning easier music up to speed, getting a command of the instrument, and THEN trying to play whatever it is you can't currently play at tempo.

Way too many guitarists spend way too much time playing advanced material at half speed when they have no real hope of playing it well (or at all) at full tempo. That's atotal waste - it gets you no closer to playing anything.

Start worrying about what you CAN play, and get out and play that rather than worrying about what you CAN'T play. Over time, what you can play will expand.


QFT

I mix it up. For instance, if I were to learn a fast alternate picking passage which would just be out of my reach, I'd develop some exercises for myself that features the difficult parts of whatever I'm trying to do, yet a little bit toned down. That way I can be creative and advance my guitar playing.
Yeah
#9
Your ultimate problem may be that you're playing things that are far too difficult for you. Yes, you should be challenging yourself, but you should challenge yourself with stuff you can handle.