#1
Hey guys i'm struggling to find any info anywhere on how different electric guitar bridges and scale lengths/number of frets affect the tension of the strings in relation to bending and vibrato etc. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
#4
I think the only 2 things that affect string tention are scale length and string gauge. Shorter scales have lower tention for the same tuning and thinner strings have the same effect. I could be wrong about those being the only 2 but I do know that they affect it that way.
#5
you see iv played 24 fret guitars with TOM bridges and the strings feel looser than a fender strat with its tremolo bridge, does that mean that a guitar with a floyd rose will also have a higher string tension than other bridges?
#7
okay okay lets say i have two identical guitars except one has an original floyd rose (set to float) and the other has a tune-o-matic, which will have higher string tension?
#8
they would both be the same. Bridge type doesn't change tention. The TOM verses strat tention difference is because most TOM bridged guitars are 24 3/4 scale length where as strats are 25.5 scale length.
#9
Quote by hendo <3 valves
they would both be the same. Bridge type doesn't change tention. The TOM verses strat tention difference is because most TOM bridged guitars are 24 3/4 scale length where as strats are 25.5 scale length.


so can i have a 24 fret guitar with a 24 3/4 inch scale?
#10
You waited for all of four minutes before having a go at us for not helping you out... how old are you?
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#11
Quote by Ma-hog!
so can i have a 24 fret guitar with a 24 3/4 inch scale?



Yeah, it's possible, 24 fret guitars aren't caused by making the scale length longer but by extending how far down the guitar the fretboard continues. The distance between the nut and bridge can remain the same.

Dont ask me where to find one though lol
#12
Quote by hendo <3 valves
Yeah, it's possible, 24 fret guitars aren't caused by making the scale length longer but by extending how far down the guitar the fretboard continues. The distance between the nut and bridge can remain the same.

Dont ask me where to find one though lol


http://www.thomann.de/ie/epiphone_futura_custom_fx_me.htm

theres one! lol

i guess what im lookin for is a 24 fret guitar with 24 3/4 scale and a floyd rose........... any one got any suggestions?
#13
Quote by Ma-hog!
okay okay lets say i have two identical guitars except one has an original floyd rose (set to float) and the other has a tune-o-matic, which will have higher string tension?


The tension for a given note on a given scale length is always the same. It MUST be, otherwise it wouldn't be the same note anymore.

What you are looking for is the term "stiffness". The longer the additional string length BEFORE the nut and AFTER the saddles - those two being the two pivot points - and the smaller the break angle, the less stiff the string will be when you try to bend it or even just press it down. But as soon as you set a whammy bridge to float, it'll have a certain "give", so when you bend or fret the string with your fretting hand, the bridge might tilt forward, detuning the rest of the strings ever so slightly.
But if the trem springs are strong enough or you block the trem and your strings are locked at both ends, you successfully eliminated the pivot points, thus your Floyd equipped guitar will feel stiffer under your fretting fingers than any other non-locking guitar with the same scale length.
#14
Quote by Tinderwet
The tension for a given note on a given scale length is always the same. It MUST be, otherwise it wouldn't be the same note anymore.

What you are looking for is the term "stiffness". The longer the additional string length BEFORE the nut and AFTER the saddles - those two being the two pivot points - and the smaller the break angle, the less stiff the string will be when you try to bend it or even just press it down. But as soon as you set a whammy bridge to float, it'll have a certain "give", so when you bend or fret the string with your fretting hand, the bridge might tilt forward, detuning the rest of the strings ever so slightly.
But if the trem springs are strong enough or you block the trem and your strings are locked at both ends, you successfully eliminated the pivot points, thus your Floyd equipped guitar will feel stiffer under your fretting fingers than any other non-locking guitar with the same scale length.


oh i do not want that! is there any way i can make the string 'stiffness' on a Floyd rose equipped guitar the same as lets say a Les Paul with TOM bridge?
#16
Quote by Ma-hog!
oh i do not want that! is there any way i can make the string 'stiffness' on a Floyd rose equipped guitar the same as lets say a Les Paul with TOM bridge?


If you could get a 24 3/4'' scale guitar with a floyd-rose, it would still be pretty similar in feel. These differences are not major, especially not if your nut and bridge are not the roller or low friction kind.