#1
I play an Ibanez SA-160 (with a Dimarzio Superdistortion in the bridgeposition) through a Digitech RP150 multi-effectspedal and a Laney LX120RH Half-stack amp.
The problem is, my distorted sound is a bit "thin". I don't play a lot of metal, just some Metallica stuff for myself. I usually play rock like Green Day, Anouk, etc (i'm in one of those standard saturdaynight cover-bands)...

I'd like to have my distorted sound a bit more "full", especially on the palmmutes and solo's. Pretty hard to explain what i mean, but i hope you get it.

Any tips?
Gear:

Ibanez SA-160 (with Dimarzio super distortion)
Laney LX120 halfstack



Quote by ethan_hanus
Spent 5 hours innotating it, I know it's correct.
No you don't!
#4
So you're saying it's mostly my effects? I did try a boss ds-2 turbo distortion a few weeks back, but didn't notice a huge difference (although i wasn't playing through my own amp).
Gear:

Ibanez SA-160 (with Dimarzio super distortion)
Laney LX120 halfstack



Quote by ethan_hanus
Spent 5 hours innotating it, I know it's correct.
No you don't!
#7
I'd say it's your amp settings, with a mixture of the pedal.
Personally, for a full sound, I use the following: Gain: 8-10, Bass: 8, Mid: 4, Treble: 7, Contour: 7.
-------------------------------------------
Gear:

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Amplification: Randall RG75 G3
#8
Lose the multi-effects pedal, you're better off getting a cheap od/dist box like a Boss DS-1 then that. Anyways, play around with the EQ but I wouldn't be lowering your mids. Boost the mids if you want, lower your gain so its not as compressed and turn up the volume. Move some air, then you'll hear more fullness.
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#9
Quote by DSOTM80
Lose the multi-effects pedal, you're better off getting a cheap od/dist box like a Boss DS-1 then that. Anyways, play around with the EQ but I wouldn't be lowering your mids. Boost the mids if you want, lower your gain so its not as compressed and turn up the volume. Move some air, then you'll hear more fullness.

i agree. i find sometimes people who use lots of distortion sound thin and/processed sounding. imo, you dont need tons of gain to sound big and agressive.
#10
Back off your gain. Too much gain will make you sound like an old nintendo game no matter what you do.
#12
I currently use the standard rock setting: treble on 4-5, mids on 3, low on 6-7. I'll try adding some more mids.

I'm also thinking of adding a distortion stompbox, since I do like the cleans of the RP-150, but the distortions.... But i'll check out the mid increasing first.

Any other things i could do?
Gear:

Ibanez SA-160 (with Dimarzio super distortion)
Laney LX120 halfstack



Quote by ethan_hanus
Spent 5 hours innotating it, I know it's correct.
No you don't!
#13
To be honest, if the LX120 is anything like the LX20 I had, you're going to struggle getting a nice tone out of it. I always found that the amp sounded really thin and lifeless. The biggest improvement (if you're willing to get rid of the head and the multi-fx) would be to spend the money on a second hand tube head.
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#14
Well, i tried numerous amps, including some tube amps, before purchasing this one. And this one had by far the fullest tone. The LX20 is 20 watts i gues? So that might explain the thin sound of it. Tone is a lot of personal preference ofcourse, but i like the tone of my amp so i won't ship that out the door.
Gear:

Ibanez SA-160 (with Dimarzio super distortion)
Laney LX120 halfstack



Quote by ethan_hanus
Spent 5 hours innotating it, I know it's correct.
No you don't!
#16
Like i sayd, i won't get rid of the amp.

But since my clean tone is good, maybe i just need a new distortion stompbox..? Any recommendations on that, while keeping my guitar, amp and musicstyle in mind?
Gear:

Ibanez SA-160 (with Dimarzio super distortion)
Laney LX120 halfstack



Quote by ethan_hanus
Spent 5 hours innotating it, I know it's correct.
No you don't!
#17
Quote by sido
Like i sayd, i won't get rid of the amp.

But since my clean tone is good, maybe i just need a new distortion stompbox..? Any recommendations on that, while keeping my guitar, amp and musicstyle in mind?

Unfortunately that's where the problem lies.
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#18
Guitar with a high output ceramic pickup and vibrato bridge, digital multi-effect pedal and an overpowered solid state amplifier and you're wondering why your tone is thin?

You need to change either your amp or both the pedal and the guitar. You can't get a thicker tone (or in fact any kind of real change in tone) just by changing, removing or adding one small thing; you need to shift something meaningful. Changing your amp will be much easier, cheaper and will give you a better shot at sorting your tone out permanently in one go. Changing your guitar to something that has a naturally much thicker and warmer tone would also give you a fair stab at sorting your tone out but of course that can be much more expensive and if you like Ibanez guitars and vibrato bridges then the sort of guitar that is warm and thick-toned enough to compensate for your amplifier isn't going to be the sort of guitar you'll want to play anyway.

What you need to remember is solid state amps are very precise. They give a more "correct" representation of your sound and playing than a valve amp will. The problem is of course that precision rarely has any real character. It's pretty much the same deal as active pickups vs passive pickups and digital files vs tape and vinyl, its technical quality vs character. Just as passive pickups colour your tone more than actives do, so do valves colour your tone more than solid state amps do. It's that colour that you're missing. Sometimes, the colourless tone of solid state amps can be ideal - indeed, active pickups with a solid state amp is a very popular combination for jazz music which demands high precision and no noise. Of course for any kind of rock music, this isn't so great. Your guitar's bright-toned hardware and electronics, coupled with the digital processing and the solid state amp are giving you a very precise tone that would be great if you played the extermes of jazz or death metal, but for rock it is an unsuitable combination. You need to inject some character; that means changing to a valve amp or changing to a warmer guitar. Pick your poision basically. Just remember that an amp change will be cheaper and have a greater and more positive effect.


EDIT: okay that reads weirdly but **** it, it's half past two in the morning. You get the idea.

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