#1
Sorry for the second post concerning this type of thing, but where does the E7 and F- chord come from in the space oddity chorus?
#2
Edited: Nevermind. I didn't listen hard enough.

The Fm is just a simple chromatic alteration of the F major chord. It's also borrowed from the parallel minor.

The E is also a simple chromatic alteration. E7 just adds the diatonic D note to that.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jun 28, 2010,
#3
thanks for answering yet another question. I have just been getting into analyzing songs, so you've been a huge help!
#4
Quote by WalrusNutFart
thanks for answering yet another question. I have just been getting into analyzing songs, so you've been a huge help!
Glad to help. I love harmonic analysis, so it's nice to see people interested in learning about it.

Edit: Just realized my answers were very vague. If you would like a bit more detail, be sure to let me know.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jun 28, 2010,
#5
Well I can see where the f minor comes from, but where does the G# come from in the E7? Also, I just came across a B minor which I'm not sure where it comes from either.
#6
Well one way to look at the E/E7 is as a secondary dominant (V/vi, a common secondary dominant).

Another way to look at it is as if you were in A minor for that split second. Although it's not strictly diatonic to the key of A minor, it does occur naturally in the A harmonic minor scale. In fact, the V is actually far more common than the diatonic v because it strengthens the resolution to the tonic.

This is a bit of an odd way to look at it, as it's not in A minor, but it's similar to looking at chords borrowed from the parallel minor.

As for the B minor, it's basically just another chromatic alteration. You could look at it as borrowed from the C lydian scale, as it uses the #4, F#. It also moves downward to the A minor, looking a bit like this:

F# E
D  C
B  A
In other words, every note moves down a whole step.

You can also look at this as a temporary modulation, tonicizing Em (which is a simple modulation as the key signature only changes by one note (F#).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#8
Quote by WalrusNutFart
Wow, you're like an encyclopedia...thanks again.
Haha, any time.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea