#1
cheap electric guitar good amp or expansive guitar normal amp???

good amp like roland microcube
normal amp like orange micro crush pix
#2
Neither of those are great amps, let's be honest. Although the Roland Micro is a beast for something so tiny.

It doesn't really matter - you need both to get a great sound. You should keep your eye out for bargains for both, and buy whichever comes at a good price first. Then, save up and buy the other.

However, if I had to say one or the other, I'd say go nice guitar first.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

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#3
good amp cheap guitar

Ibanez S670FM
Ibanez Masa SX60
Roland Cube 60
CryBaby GCB 95
Ibanez GSR180 Bass



♫ ♫ ♫ ♫ ♫ ♫
#7
Quote by firefire123
Ibanez GRX-140 good or not...


the ibanez gio bass is pretty dam good for the money so im sure the guitar version would be good too

Ibanez S670FM
Ibanez Masa SX60
Roland Cube 60
CryBaby GCB 95
Ibanez GSR180 Bass



♫ ♫ ♫ ♫ ♫ ♫
#10
Good amp, that's the main output of your tone imo.
-------------------------------------------
Gear:

Guitar(s): .Shecter Tempest EXTREMEEEEEE
--------------Maton CW-80

Amplification: Randall RG75 G3
#11
well it doesn't matter,

if you want to sound "good" then go with the cheap guitar expensive amp

but I'd prefer getting a good guitar, I personally made a huge step forward in my playing when upgrading from my gio, movement seems more natural and it just works (with the gio I constantly had the feeling I was in a fight with the guitar, it either went out of tune, sounded crap on higher notes even when the intonation spot on)

so imo: good guitar first, a different guitar takes some time to get used to, amps can be switched any time you want and your playing wouldn't get worse a bit, while a different neck might f-ck up your playing for a while



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#12
I'd say the PLAYABILITY of the guitar is of utmost importance. This doesn't mean the guitar needs to be expensive either. Just about any guitar can be made extremely playable by someone who knows what they are doing.
#14
expansive guitar


hmm...I havent seen guitars that expand ???

if I were you I'd go with the cheap guitar and the good amp
#15
Quote by archenemyfan
hmm...I havent seen guitars that expand ???

if I were you I'd go with the cheap guitar and the good amp

You've never seen a guitar sit in the NC sun for an hour... Good God that killed the tuning.
This ends now, eat the goddamn beans!
#16
Electronics only account for part of a guitar's sound. The body type, wood choice, quality of construction, etc. all impact the tone as much as anything else. The natural acoustic resonance makes a huge difference, even with solidbody instruments. So the simple fact is no amplifier is going to make a lousy guitar sound great.

I'm still using my old, beat-up solid-state amp from when I bought my first electric. It never sounded good with any solid body instrument I tried, but lately I got a Gretsch G5120 -- a mid-range instrument, price wise -- and it just sings. What's the secret? It's a hollowbody instrument with resonance to put my "real" acoustics to shame. Also, a Gibson ES-335 doesn't sound half bad through a Marshall MG (at least on the clean channel). Seriously; try it.

Now, does that mean the amp doesn't make any difference at all? Of course not! The amp, pickups, etc. all color the tone, to greater or lesser extent. But when it comes right down to it, tone really comes from the wood. That's why a hollowbody doesn't sound like a Les Paul, and a Les Paul doesn't sound like a Strat, and a Strat doesn't sound like a cheap Ibanez, and a cheap Ibanez doesn't sound like the kind of instrument anyone in their right mind would buy.

Just my two cents.
#17
Get a decent guitar that's set up properly, suited to the style of music you play, comfortable to play and you like the look of.

After that get a quality amp that suits your tone, will last and will be loud enough for whatever you want to do.

After that if you feel you need something new in a guitar, get a guitar that fits all the criteria listed above that is also a step up in terms of wood quality, pickups, electronics, hardware etc.. and general build quality.
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#18
I prefer contractive guitars myself.
Dear God, do you actually answer prayers?

Yes, but only in a way indistinguishable from random luck or the result of your own efforts.
#19
Quote by Mad Marius
I prefer contractive guitars myself.

I prefer guitars that remain exactly the same size, but I suppose I'm a bit of a Luddite.
#20
how to identify sound good or not good?planning to get a good amp and normal guitar...
#21
Quote by firefire123
how to identify sound good or not good?planning to get a good amp and normal guitar...

It's all personal preference, really. Whatever sounds good to you.

But you're seriously better off getting a good guitar first. You can always upgrade your amp.
#23
Quote by bear.territory
always always always get a good amp first

Bullshit. Tone comes from the wood. Your amp and pickups, no matter how good, can only do so much to hide it.

Anyway, it's easier to pick an amp that suits the guitar, than the other way around.
#24
Quote by aerosmith513
the vox ac4tv is cheap and good if you like bluesy to hard rock stuff.


+1 on the amp recommendation. Amp first, a good amp can make a bad guitar sound good, but that doesn't work the other way around.

On second thought, that's assuming that you have a cheaper guitar that plays well, but just has substandard electronics and pups. Above all else, you've got to have a guitar that you enjoy playing first.
Last edited by irishstang_87 at Jun 29, 2010,