#1
how do they work?? does the whole song follow the same progression or does it change usually? im sorry for being such a noob in this situatioin
#3
.


<------------------ see these guys.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#4
Well can you give us some examples of metal bands? Most "real metal" doesn't typically follow chord progressions, most of it is riff based. But nowadays you see a lot of metal bands, metalcore in particular, using chord progressions as a basis for their riffs.

example:


D-----------------------------11-8-7------------------
A------7-8------8-10------5-7---------------10-8-7----
D-0-0------8-8-------5-5------7-7---------------------


Just a basic metalcore riff that's probably been done a hundred times over. But if you look, the pedal point changes from D, to Bb, to G, to A.

If we look at our D Minor scale (D, E, F, G, A, Bb, C, D), we'll find that those notes make up a 1-6-4-5 in D Minor, so it would be a i-VI-iv-v, but really the v chord is raised to a major chord in this little riff which is why there's a harmonic minor lick at the end. Probably the second guitar would be doing something like

D--0---8----5---7----
A--0---8----5---7----
D--0---8----5---7----


under it. Hope this helps

EDIT: I made a booboo in the first riff. I fixed it though.
Last edited by aCloudConnected at Jun 29, 2010,
#5
Quote by aCloudConnected
Well can you give us some examples of metal bands? Most "real metal" doesn't typically follow chord progressions, most of it is riff based. But nowadays you see a lot of metal bands, metalcore in particular, using chord progressions as a basis for their riffs.



I dont particularly agree with that. Some of the more extreme bands in the black & death varieties maybe (up to a point), but metal certainly uses progressions in the music. I guess you could say that metal bands use chord progressions, but differently then the usual sense.
Metal likes tension, which doesn't necessarily need to resolve, and it doesn't avoid dissonance. So you wont see a lot of the usual cadences and I-IV-V stuff like pop... (probably)

And in how far is a riff different from a chord? Not in the way how you play it, mind you, but melodically?
Because once you put a bunch of (repeating) notes together with a tonal center and follow up with another bunch and thus shift the tonal center, you basicly have a progression.
#6
Quote by guitarmageddon0
how do they work?? does the whole song follow the same progression or does it change usually? im sorry for being such a noob in this situatioin

Just the same as in any other song really. Most often they don't follow the same one progression but have one for the verse, chorus, and solo or something like that. Then there are riffs over the chords and sometimes just riffs themselves that can imply a certain chord. This is what I most often encounter anyways.

Then there are the progressive bands like BTBAM that really do whatever the hell they want.

There aren't any rules or standards for metal that say you have to do it a certain way or anything.

Sorry if this is vague, my brain is empty right now.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#7
Quote by ShadesOfGray
I dont particularly agree with that. Some of the more extreme bands in the black & death varieties maybe (up to a point), but metal certainly uses progressions in the music. I guess you could say that metal bands use chord progressions, but differently then the usual sense.
Metal likes tension, which doesn't necessarily need to resolve, and it doesn't avoid dissonance. So you wont see a lot of the usual cadences and I-IV-V stuff like pop... (probably)

And in how far is a riff different from a chord? Not in the way how you play it, mind you, but melodically?
Because once you put a bunch of (repeating) notes together with a tonal center and follow up with another bunch and thus shift the tonal center, you basicly have a progression.


Hmm, I see your point. But what I was saying is that you're not really going to see a legitimate "chord progression" in a lot of metal. Like look at Master of Puppets. I really wouldn't say the intro is a chord progression. There's not a i iii bVI V or something like that. You could say the chorus has a chord progression, but I wouldn't really call it one, and I'm sure Metallica didn't think of it as a progression when they wrote it.
#8
Quote by ShadesOfGray
So you wont see a lot of the usual cadences and I-IV-V stuff like pop...


Actually it's quite common. As aCloudConnected elaborated on pedal tones are used to support movement. Also, progression doesn't necessarily have to be played like you basic open C, G chords, but implied through the notes in the melody. Metal isn't afraid of dissonance, and it's one of the dominant features of the genre along with timbre (ie. distortion) and the way rhythms are accented (ie. syncopation) and extremely aggressive.

To get that dissonant sound artists tend to accent or make dissonant scale degrees stand out, such as the b6 from the minor scale, or the b2 which I would think to be more common in metal then any other genre of music. The point of those dissonant intervals are to build up huge amounts of tension before resolving. The b6 wants to drop a semitone to the 5, the b2 wants to go back to the root.

I don't necessarily agree with the statement that the tension doesn't have to resolve, but merely prolonged. Metal is full of powerful cadences such as V - I, usually the V being preceded by a VI, bII - I or the I-VI-IV-V example previously posted. So while a pop song may use a G7 - C cadence to build up tension, a metal one may use Db5 - C5.

Metal bands will use certain scales such as the harmonic minor, phygrian or phygrian dominant that promote usage of dissonant intervals. For example go up the phygrian dominant scale there are three semitone intervals within the scale plus a minor third interval, all which can lead to intriguing melodies.

I would elabroate more on the subject but I think aCloudConnected pretty much hit it dead on.


Edit: TS, please listen to Opeth
Quote by Night
wtf is a selfie? is that like, touching yourself or something?
Last edited by Wiegenlied at Jul 1, 2010,