#1
Ask the average person if you should buy gear online. Half of 'em will say not to, while the rest will say to run with it. Why? Price, generally. It'll be easier to find deals online. But where? Websites like American Musical supply, Musician's Friend, and even Guitar Center all seem to have the same price as many brick and mortar stores. Ebay seems a bit scary, Craigslist means dealing with bullshit offers, and anywhere else is likely a smaller site, where the fear of lacking protection could mean scammage. What's a poor guitarist to do?

Such was my position. At first, anyways.

Since that (long distant) time, I've bought guitars and amps online, AS WELL as in stores. I've developed this handy little guide for figuring out when buying online is recommended, when it isn't, and when you need to try it before you buy it! Now, I'm not gonna trash trying before you buy, and you simply can't do that in online (unless you happen to use craigslist or get lucky on Ebay, which I'll cover). Trying is the number one way to guarantee you'll love your new acquisition. I love my SG which I got online, but rarely touch my Ibanez. My Randall, I bought online, but got to demo before I made the final payoff, and other things I've bought, I've used this method. Here is my basic guide, put together from years of experience.
-----
Factors

First, let's note the various factors that'll effect whether you even wanna CONSIDER going online.

-Local store: Is it known to allow haggling? Do you wish to pay it particular patronage? Willing to pay it's price?

-Fear of technology: Some people will just never trust this stuff. Do you accept that you may send money over the web without personally seeing the product in hand instantly?

-Fear of scams: Can you trust a site like Ebay or Craigslist? Are you good at spotting scammers?

-Incapable of shipping: If you can not navigate a mailbox, you need not apply.

These and many other things affect you. Try to determine your personal opinion before even considering online purchasing, as it's silly to even try if it's something you're not comfortable with!
---
Things you can safely buy online (without trying)

What I am about to say requires more than just taking my word for it. Everything is built differently, even if it claims not to be. On most circuitboards/innards of an amp, they will use the same rated units for all pieces. However, when you're talking about THOSE pieces, while they may all be named the same, there can be up to a 10% difference between any two given units. Considering every single thing in the amp can basically havethis variability, and you must acknowledge that it may sound VERY different than the (already too scratchy) youtube videos. It is ALWAYS best to try. However, sometimes you just can't. Here are the times where you can do it without much fear.

Strings/accessories: By and large, you couldn't really demo strings too well before hand. Most capos will be roughly the same, and you can trade these for other guitarist's capos if you want to and they are willing. If it costs 50$ or less (at a major store), you can basically trust the internet; I don't think I've EVER heard of counterfeit strings. As usual, be wary for deals that are too good to be true on ebay and craigslist; you can sometimes get up to 50% off on a used piece of gear. Same goes for large packs of gear with many pieces inside. Use sense.

Electric Guitars (if you are knowledgable): This one is only for people who are capable or willing to have pickups changed, or who can identify what they like in a guitar. If you can tell roughly how mahogany will sound on your guitar versus maple, and the difference between high output and low output pickups, go ahead. Your amp and hands make a majority of the difference, and many things can be EQ'd. Now, I assume you know what you like in a neck too, which is important. Even then, necks vary on every instrument. It is ALWAYS better to buy in person on this stuff, preferably using craigslist or a nearby ebay seller, where you can get that lovely internet price while trying in person. That said, if you're a risk taker, this is something where it CAN pay off. The difference of tone between individual instruments of the same model nowadays is relatively small. The feel may not be, but there is the risk. It can go poorly, or it can go great! I got both my JS20S and my SG Classic over the internet. The JS was too thin, and I should have been able to realize it would be ahead of time; I was stupid. The SG felt perfectly, as I knew it would; I'd played multiple SG's before hand, and loved 'em all. If you knew it well enough that you'd buy any one of multiple units of the same model in person, DEFINITELY go online, as you can get it cheaper for the same general feel that you already love.

If you have to ask a hundred questions about the actual model, or if you're new to guitar, online guitar buying is not the wisest idea. You can't really appreciate tonal differences yet, and it's not gonna be fun if you buy a thousand dollar tone machine at 3 months, and find out it's not such a tone machine at 6 months.


If you can't buy it in person: This goes to older gear, most boutique usually, etc. If you can identify most of thee things, you probably know to get it. If you can tell me WHY you want a keeley-modded DS1, then by all means, order over the internet; I can't imagine you being disappointed. You likely have no method BUT the internet; all you need to do is ascertain WHY you want it, and if it's worth the price listed.
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Things you should NOT buy online

Acoustic instruments: If it's not plugged in, then the final tone of the instrument isn't something you can really edit with effects or an amp. Listen to it in person. You may love Martin acoustics on youtube, but if you buy one and it arrives as being far to bassy for your tastes, too bad; you just lost 2,000$ on youtube's poor compression You can buy the really cheap ones (300 and down), but only if you accept the risk, and even then, only because at that price, you know it can't be great; you can only get lucky to get a gem there, usually.

Speaking of price, expensive doesn't equal perfect. We all have a different ear for tone. You don't NEED to buy the top end to get the best. If you walk into a store and demo 50 instruments, you may end up loving one you'd never thought nor heard of, and it could be a lot cheaper than that Taylor custom you were eyeing. Grab what appeals to you. I got my Taylor T5-C1 entirely by surprise. I just walked into a guitar center, and, two hours later, acknowledged that none of the Gibson or Gretsch semihollows they had were loud enough to play acoustically and to enjoy the tone. I wandered into the acoustic area, found the T5, and loved it. I liked the tone of it better than the real acoustics, and it is the best PLAYING guitar I've ever felt (even better than my SG, except with less fret access). I snapped it up on the spot, and read it's features on the Taylor website that night.

And my second favorite guitar they had in there? A two hundred dollar "Taylor Swift" signature piece for beginners. Sounded beautiful.

Amps (when it can be avoided): Let's face it, all amps are different. Most demos don't help much, since the demoer's choice of EQ, playing style, hands, and instrument (and IT'S settings), plus any effects, will differentiate it from you. You can love an amp online and hate it in person. The only amps really immune to this are the ones at the very top, the cream of the crop amps where each piece it picked by hand, carried on a pillow into Mike Soldano's room, and stays there for several hours, as he caresses them with the love he might show a child or woma--- I like SLO100's... Don't hate. But yeah, amps like the SLO100, or a Budda SD80, or a Bogner Shiva, or all kinds of boutques, are the only ones you can guarantee will sound the way you think they will. One Marshall JCM2000 could have 80% of the gain of another. Another could have a phenomenal clean channel. Etc. Buy online if you have to; try to arrange a testing pickup point if at all possible, as this is the best possible case. I did this with my Randall RM100; played it, demoed a few other amps in the guy's store, including some Riveras and other Randalls, and even a custom amp he built. The Randall won out, though his amp was pretty nice, just too pricey for the quality.
Gear
---------
JS20S Satriani signature
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Gibson SG Classic
Randall RM100 Combo w/ Plexi, JTM, Ultra, Recto, and Brown Modules
Last edited by Phantom123 at Jun 29, 2010,
#3
good idea. I'll read through it properly later, i want to watch the football.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#4
5/5.

Dude, thanks for making this guide. I was just asking myself if I should buy some new equipment over the internet and this covered most of what I was thinking, at least on the subject of accessories and amplifiers. Right now, I'm contemplating if buying a DBZ guitar over the internet is such a good idea. I love the way they look but have no idea on how they sound. I can't really test them out, seeing how I live in Quebec and the only store (in Canada) that is affiliated with DBZ is in British Columbia.
#5
I have no experience with DBZ, but it's made by the original owner of Dean, so it's probably gonna be a similar business model; prettier looks in exchange for not quite as good tone. Then again, some people swear by Dean, so ask them =P It'll probably resemble most of his old Dean work, if slightly updated.
=======---
Amplifiers: When should you go online for them, where are they, what makes a good deal

Amplifiers are something of a source of contention. Most people seem pretty happy to buy them online. I'd like to suggest that there are a few cases when this is not ideal, but then to comment on when it indeed is! Let's look at some facts.

-Unless you live in a major city, you won't have many varieties of amps available to you, in most cases

-Even then, most Boutique amps are going to be unfindable. Those can be etremely rare.

-The quality of any given amp versus it's schematic is 10%; you can find up to a 10% difference in voltage for any given part, etc. This means that, when you entire amp is roughly 10% off of what you may have heard in a demo, it means a lot.

-Amps tend to fail more regularly than guitars; a guitar failure means you broke the guitar, or a pickup went microphonic. Most of these are very obvious fixes; luthier that junk up, buy new pickup, move on. Amps tend to be stranger; if you have no idea what a phase inverter does (or even is), how are you supposed to recognize that you need a replacement?

Cities

Let's start with that city-thing. The fact is, there are a lot of people who will read this and think "Ha, yeah right. All we have by me are Spiders and MGs". In fact, by and large, I have that too; all Vypyrs and Ibanez amps. Unless you live in a major city, you may not be able to find a lot of stuff within what you'd call a reasonable range.

What's a reasonable range?

We'll call it the distance you're willing to drive for gear. My nearest major stores are 90 miles out. I am not willing to drive that far on a whim. However, I AM WILLING stop by the store if I am within an hour's distance of it, and either specifically wanna look at something, or may buy. Determine this range for yourself, as it should be consulted before you go online. If you can't get it within this range, THEN you look at the web. Better yet, you find you can, and then price-check through the web, to see if you're getting ripped off.

Boutique

For our purposes, an amp will be considered boutique if it costs over 2000$ new. There ARE cheaper boutique items, and there are more expensive main stream purchases; I am simply discussing the uber expensive tops of the line.

Most boutiques (in the traditional use of the word) will be very rare. Most stores don't carry Dr. Z, even the big places. Especially the big places, actually. They will likely stock the big sellers (which, as you likely know, are beginner amps). As well, getting something like a Cornford or a Z is practically an investment in yourself; you're paying top dollar for a product, either because you expect to be able to make the money back USING the amp, or because you just REALLY love guitars. Please be honest with yourself; it's not an investment in regards to resale. You will not be able to sell it for more than you bought it, likely, unless you find a hell of a deal (on the internet, or with a friend). You're getting this because you want it, not because it'll pay for your car when you play it for a while then sell it. Few items appreciate that highly, and usually, you won't know that they will until they do.

Back to OUR definition of the word. If you're buying a boutique, you really need to play it in person. On one hand, they tend to be known for their very specific tonal skills, so if you're a gambling man, again, go ahead and use the web by default. However, if you have ANY chance to try before you buy, take it. 2,000$ is, for most people reading this, a huge chunk of change. It likely means selling something else before buying, or else getting a hell of a paycheck by surprise after paying taxes. Do NOT buy something this expensive on a payment plan; it's just an awful idea for a variety of reasons I'd rather not cover here. Only take one if you can get zero interest PERIOD (which is only something that can be navigated man to man, not with a big chain).

In the end, you will probably BUY your piece online, as it probably won't be available near you. This is alright. Just remember how much money you are setting down; if you're disappointed with this (which is the major risk you take when you buy online), you're down a creek and without a paddle. On a 2,000$ new piece, expect to take 6-800$ loss if you want to sell it.

There is no easy way to take no loss selling gear; you either have to have (now vintage) gear which has, by sheer luck, appreciated, or to find a complete moron (which, don't kid yourself, is hard. On Ebay at this very moment is a Richie Sambora owned SLO100. Beloved amp, famous guy. 5,000 Dollars wanted. Been there all year; it's not gonna sell until it gets put into some charity. This is a case where someone bought something figuring it my be an investable piece)

--To be Continued-- Taking a break from writing =P
Gear
---------
JS20S Satriani signature
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Gibson SG Classic
Randall RM100 Combo w/ Plexi, JTM, Ultra, Recto, and Brown Modules
Last edited by Phantom123 at Jun 29, 2010,
#7
Quote by WtrPlyr
I don't get why you say you can buy guitars online but you can't buy amps online
All the reasons you list to discourage the buying of amps online apply to guitars and vice versa.


You can buy amps online, but it's slightly more risky. I didn't write this in, but may edit this fact into there, but for amps...

-Crafts even more of your tone than Guitars
-Youtube demos can be misleading (I'll likely make a section on this to expound)
-Components are more likely to require replacement than on a guitar. Guitar's wood is basically gonna be permanent, if on verge of getting old, and that's usually good. On an amp, older electronics tends to mean more likelyhood of failure. You tend to need to check them in person for such signs.
-More difficult to mod than guitars; with a guitar, pickup changes are pretty easy, and can do a lot. Lot harder to change circuits, capacitors, hell for some, even tubes seem scary.

There is more, but I'm eating. I'll make a section, ok?
Gear
---------
JS20S Satriani signature
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Gibson SG Classic
Randall RM100 Combo w/ Plexi, JTM, Ultra, Recto, and Brown Modules
#9
Quote by Phantom123

Things you can safely buy online (without trying)


Electric Guitars (if you are knowledgable):


Things you should NOT buy online


Amps (when it can be avoided):



I don't know. I kinda disagree. An amp I can feel comfortable with buying online IF I trust the seller and the amp is of good quality. There are so many quirks to guitars - it would have to be something really special for ME to buy a guitar online. Just sayin'



otherwise, i think it is a good idea for a thread
#10
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
I don't know. I kinda disagree. An amp I can feel comfortable with buying online IF I trust the seller and the amp is of good quality. There are so many quirks to guitars - it would have to be something really special for ME to buy a guitar online. Just sayin'



otherwise, i think it is a good idea for a thread


I explained my logic; High quality amps CAN be bought online. You can rely on something of boutique quality, since every individual bit is handpicked. However, for something midline, like a JCM2000, you need to be cautious. As to guitar, my unspoken comment was that feel is very important, and you need to decide how much it counts to you. I think I said something to that effect somewhere, actually.
Gear
---------
JS20S Satriani signature
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Gibson SG Classic
Randall RM100 Combo w/ Plexi, JTM, Ultra, Recto, and Brown Modules
#11
Stuck!
Gear:
Ibanez RG4EXFM1
Peavey 5150II All Tube 120w Head
Avatar contemporary 2x12 (Celestion v30's)
Peavey Vypyr 15w (Fantastic Practice Amp!!!)

Got Djent?
#12
Quote by Phantom123
I explained my logic; High quality amps CAN be bought online. You can rely on something of boutique quality, since every individual bit is handpicked. However, for something midline, like a JCM2000, you need to be cautious. As to guitar, my unspoken comment was that feel is very important, and you need to decide how much it counts to you. I think I said something to that effect somewhere, actually.


I read the whole thing before I posted
#13
I think we're both right =P

"Now, I assume you know what you like in a neck too, which is important. Even then, necks vary on every instrument. It is ALWAYS better to buy in person on this stuff, preferably using craigslist or a nearby ebay seller, where you can get that lovely internet price while trying in person. That said, if you're a risk taker, this is something where it CAN pay off. The difference of tone between individual instruments of the same model nowadays is relatively small. The feel may not be, but there is the risk. It can go poorly, or it can go great!"

I commented on feel, which is what I was talking about. I didn't really mention the "mojo" factor so to speak; that sort of thing that just attracts you to a guitar, whether you know why or not.

Regardless, I'll fix that
Gear
---------
JS20S Satriani signature
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Gibson SG Classic
Randall RM100 Combo w/ Plexi, JTM, Ultra, Recto, and Brown Modules
#14
Quote by Phantom123
I think we're both right =P

That's fair. You make some good points. Instead of categorizing into 'Things into buy safely' and 'Things to avoid' maybe just list the pros and cons of buying the various instruments separately. That is how I would have structured it.

*What to do when buying an acoustic guitar online.
*Things to watch out for when buying an amp online.
*Reasons for buying a guitar at a store.
*Etc.

Last edited by 311ZOSOVHJH at Jun 29, 2010,
#15
^ yeah.

I also think you need to mention things like QC (for example, I'd buy a japanese-made tokai online no problem, i wouldn't buy a gibson i hadn't tried online), the fact that trying in a store is better but also not foolproof (you can often miss stuff, or it might be set up in the shop to con you into buying it, etc.), and that if you're buying online you need to make sure the store has a good return policy.

I'm also not sure amps have as big a variation as you're saying. guitars probably have more variation.

Basically, if you've tried 20 guitars of the same model, and have found one which is "the one", you buy that exact one in the shop. Because if you order online you're not going to get the same one. But if you've tried 20 of the same model and like them all more or less equally, then buying online is fine.



Also put in some stuff about situation- if you live in a major metropolitan area you have less reason to buy online than if you live in the middle of nowhere. And, from experience, while buying online without trying is risky, buying something you can try which you know is mediocre almost always ends badly.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Jun 29, 2010,
#16
i like slo's. i love it like a woman. or a child.
Jumping on dat gear sig train.
PRS Hollowbody II / BKP Warpigs
Strandberg OS6T / BKP Aftermath
Strandberg OS7 / Lace Poopsticks
Skervesen Raptor 7FF / BKP Warpigs
Skervesen Raptor 6 NTB / BKP Juggernauts
Hapas Sludge 7 FF / Hapas Leviathan
Anderson Baritom / Motorcity Nuke BKP Sinner Anderson H2+
Warmoth Baritone / BKP Piledriver
Ibanez Rg2120x / BKP Nailbomb

Blackstar ID:Core Beam
#17
Helpful hints for buying off eBay and forum classifieds would be good too. Tips for Craigslist and kijijiji too


How to negotiate shipping. How to select a shipper. Insurance. VAT taxes and Customs tips. (MC) Safe methods of payments. Scams to watch out for.
Last edited by 311ZOSOVHJH at Jun 29, 2010,
#18
*police siren*



EDIT: shit, that was to min's post.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#19
You can always just drive to a nearby sitty...

I am not going to play 20 different ones for shits, giggles, and giggly shits. I am going to go there, play, act disappointed, and dip out with the item for less then what they where selling for. All while stealing his wife. /thread
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#20
I'll update some more of this stuff in :P This is still very much a work-in-progress.
Gear
---------
JS20S Satriani signature
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Gibson SG Classic
Randall RM100 Combo w/ Plexi, JTM, Ultra, Recto, and Brown Modules
#22
Updated on a later post. I forgot edit posts
Gear
---------
JS20S Satriani signature
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Gibson SG Classic
Randall RM100 Combo w/ Plexi, JTM, Ultra, Recto, and Brown Modules
#23
nice edit there. good point about the distance, I would also add in it depends on how much it costs you to get to the place (in england, for example, train costs are prohibitive so if you don't have a car, you probably aren't going to want to travel too far- it's often cheaper to fly ), compared to how much the final cost of the product is (you don't want to pay £100 on a train or petrol if you're buying a £200 amp, but if £100 will get you to a shop which stocks 10 boutique amps at £2000 which you want to try, that's probably worth it).

Also a good point about not trying to make money out of it.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#24
Quote by Dave_Mc
nice edit there. good point about the distance, I would also add in it depends on how much it costs you to get to the place (in england, for example, train costs are prohibitive so if you don't have a car, you probably aren't going to want to travel too far- it's often cheaper to fly ), compared to how much the final cost of the product is (you don't want to pay £100 on a train or petrol if you're buying a £200 amp, but if £100 will get you to a shop which stocks 10 boutique amps at £2000 which you want to try, that's probably worth it).

Also a good point about not trying to make money out of it.


I think I may repost this later, with further edits, and more specifically, with premade edit posts =P
Gear
---------
JS20S Satriani signature
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Gibson SG Classic
Randall RM100 Combo w/ Plexi, JTM, Ultra, Recto, and Brown Modules
#25
You put a lot of time into it so I don't want to be mean.....but this guide is really unneccessary. Price isn't the biggest factor most of the time anyways, its stock. The last three major guitar related purchases I've made were impossible to find in stores locally. As for deals......you can get a discount anywhere I you have cash
#31
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH

I still contend the structure of this thread is not what I would have done.


Yeah. It's a good idea, and it took a good bit of effort, but if we want to put it in a sticky it'd probably need a bit more work. That's not a dig, anybody who writes a sticky (including me) normally needs input from other people etc. etc. to help get it to a finished state.

I think the main thing is to make it more structured, and also to make it less about opinions- opinions are good, and we should have them in the sticky, but we need to make clear which bits are opinion and which are fact, and ideally have all the differing opinions (or at least all the mainstream ones) for balance.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#32
I didn't know we were attempting to do this for a sticky-able format... I'll try some rewrites in the new thread, I guess =P
Gear
---------
JS20S Satriani signature
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Gibson SG Classic
Randall RM100 Combo w/ Plexi, JTM, Ultra, Recto, and Brown Modules
#33
I was just saying that I think it is very opinionated to say that buying electric guitars on-line is ok and buying acoustic guitars and amps on-line is not. I know you went through some caveats and such but it is still structured with that 'Things to buy online' and 'Things to avoid' headings in bold.

I realize I'm being a bit anal about it but what I would do is talk about:

Why people buy online
Where people buy online
When do people buy online
How (paypal, check, cash)

Then talk about the advantages and disadvantages of each. Contrast that with the benefits/disadvantages of buying locally or at a store.

Then dive into more specifics about what to look for when buying (x) online.

Electric guitar
Acoustic guitar
Pedals
Amps
Accessories

You could talk about how to comparison shop. Talk about how to negotiate. Talk about things to avoid and scams, etc.


Reserve a page or two if you feel it necessary.

Then open it up for discussion and tweak your OP based on feedback. Maybe leave some space for personal opinions or horror stories. whatever.


#34
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
I was just saying that I think it is very opinionated to say that buying electric guitars on-line is ok and buying acoustic guitars and amps on-line is not. I know you went through some caveats and such but it is still structured with that 'Things to buy online' and 'Things to avoid' headings in bold.

I realize I'm being a bit anal about it but what I would do is talk about:

Why people buy online
Where people buy online
When do people buy online
How (paypal, check, cash)

Then talk about the advantages and disadvantages of each. Contrast that with the benefits/disadvantages of buying locally or at a store.

Then dive into more specifics about what to look for when buying (x) online.

Electric guitar
Acoustic guitar
Pedals
Amps
Accessories

You could talk about how to comparison shop. Talk about how to negotiate. Talk about things to avoid and scams, etc.


Reserve a page or two if you feel it necessary.

Then open it up for discussion and tweak your OP based on feedback. Maybe leave some space for personal opinions or horror stories. whatever.




Makes sense. I kinda wrote it on the spur of the moment, since I noticed that I'd probably had as much and as varied of a buying history as most others, and that I could give some decent advice. I'll try to fix it up a bit more :P
Gear
---------
JS20S Satriani signature
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Gibson SG Classic
Randall RM100 Combo w/ Plexi, JTM, Ultra, Recto, and Brown Modules
#35
Quote by Beergarette
5/5.

Dude, thanks for making this guide. I was just asking myself if I should buy some new equipment over the internet and this covered most of what I was thinking, at least on the subject of accessories and amplifiers. Right now, I'm contemplating if buying a DBZ guitar over the internet is such a good idea. I love the way they look but have no idea on how they sound. I can't really test them out, seeing how I live in Quebec and the only store (in Canada) that is affiliated with DBZ is in British Columbia.



I dunno man 2 stores in my city have them


they are the imports though, I don't think they have the USA DBZ.... needless to say I think they are ugly as sin besides the Vs and X's


And I think it's safe to say that most of the same electric guitar models will sound roughly the same. Playability is a main concern, staying in tune and being able to achieve correct intonation is another.
#36
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
I was just saying that I think it is very opinionated to say that buying electric guitars on-line is ok and buying acoustic guitars and amps on-line is not. I know you went through some caveats and such but it is still structured with that 'Things to buy online' and 'Things to avoid' headings in bold.

I realize I'm being a bit anal about it but what I would do is talk about:

Why people buy online
Where people buy online
When do people buy online
How (paypal, check, cash)

Then talk about the advantages and disadvantages of each. Contrast that with the benefits/disadvantages of buying locally or at a store.

Then dive into more specifics about what to look for when buying (x) online.

Electric guitar
Acoustic guitar
Pedals
Amps
Accessories

You could talk about how to comparison shop. Talk about how to negotiate. Talk about things to avoid and scams, etc.


Reserve a page or two if you feel it necessary.

Then open it up for discussion and tweak your OP based on feedback. Maybe leave some space for personal opinions or horror stories. whatever.




yep, exactly
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?