#1
so lets say i made a riff and i figured out it is in the key of A minor

so this means basically that if i solo over it with any A minor scale or any C major scale it wouldnt sound out of key

is this true or false?
#2
Quote by actaderock
so lets say i made a riff and i figured out it is in the key of A minor

so this means basically that if i solo over it with any A minor scale or any C major scale it wouldnt sound out of key

is this true or false?

True. Ish.

It won't sound "out of key", but it won't sound "right". If you solo in C Major over an A Minor chord progression your solo and your backing are pretty much fighting for tonicization.

You WANT to use the notes in C Major, or A Minor, but you want to solo in A Minor. Not C Major. You want to make A Minor your tonic and resolve there.
#3
Quote by actaderock
so lets say i made a riff and i figured out it is in the key of A minor

so this means basically that if i solo over it with any A minor scale or any C major scale it wouldnt sound out of key

is this true or false?



True


Though when you develop a further understand of theory/scales/keys..ect you will find that playing C major over an A minor progression .... is actually just playing A minor.


Quote by DiminishedFifth
True. Ish.

It won't sound "out of key", but it won't sound "right". If you solo in C Major over an A Minor chord progression your solo and your backing are pretty much fighting for tonicization.

You WANT to use the notes in C Major, or A Minor, but you want to solo in A Minor. Not C Major. You want to make A Minor your tonic and resolve there.



Well, what'll happen is that you'll hear it as it relates to Am. C E G becomes 3 5 b7.

so, as long as your listening it will sound fine. (which is required regardless)

So the answer to the question as stated...... True (assuming he meant natural minor)

It's just when you understand more about theory you learn to call it Am and not think of it as C Major at all.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 29, 2010,
#4
Although C Major, and A minor have the same notes in them, they are still completely different keys. A minor's tonal center (root note) is on A, and the tonal center of C Major is on C, this actually makes a huge difference.

So to answer your question, if you want to solo over a riff in A minor, you will use the key of A minor, but not C Major, even though you're playing notes from both scales.
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#5
Quote by DiminishedFifth
True. Ish.

It won't sound "out of key", but it won't sound "right". If you solo in C Major over an A Minor chord progression your solo and your backing are pretty much fighting for tonicization.

You WANT to use the notes in C Major, or A Minor, but you want to solo in A Minor. Not C Major. You want to make A Minor your tonic and resolve there.

well, i said C major because A minor is the relative minor to C major, right?
#7
Quote by actaderock
well, i said C major because A minor is the relative minor to C major, right?



Thats right, they are related. And as you obviously just learned, you can utilize this too your advantage. For instance If you only know the minor scale pattern, you can play the same pattern AS the relative Major by playing it 4 frets lower.

and if thats as far as you want to take it, thats fine. Its a good little shortcut to know for those that don't know the other patterns and/or know any theory.

if you get more into theory though, you'll learn they are 2 different keys. if you're in Am, you're in Am. If you're in C.... you're in C. Same notes..... same patterns on your guitar.... different scales... different context.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 29, 2010,
#9
Basically true. However, if you have ears at all, and the riff you are soloing over is in Am, you will be soloing in Am, not C. The notes are the same, but the notes you start on and the places you play licks would be different in A minor and C major. (But again, as long as you have ears you will be playing in A minor.)
#10
Quote by DiminishedFifth
True. Ish.

It won't sound "out of key", but it won't sound "right". If you solo in C Major over an A Minor chord progression your solo and your backing are pretty much fighting for tonicization.

You WANT to use the notes in C Major, or A Minor, but you want to solo in A Minor. Not C Major. You want to make A Minor your tonic and resolve there.


bingo.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#11
No need to make it a Tonic, as far as a starting note you can lead out with the minor 3rd (or 5th) and harmonically the tonal gravity for the progression will make it (the lead etc) stabilize/resolve without even thinking about the note its on, the ear will hear it.

Best,

Sean