#1
If I am playing 12 bar blues in B Major i can simple run the B major pentatonic scale over it. What if im playing Bm pentatonic scale how do i play blues in b Minor?


let me make it clear this time!
What im asking is HOW DO I PLAY 12 BAR BLUES IN B MINOR
Last edited by YoungTigre at Jun 30, 2010,
#2
Minor pentatonic

play Bminor pentatonics over a Bminor chord

just like Bmaj pent over Bmaj chord


or like if u wanna solo with Amin Pentatonic

you can play any chords from the Aminor scale wich is A B C D E F G

usually i like to stick to the minor chords of the scale so it keeps the bluesy feeling but you can throw in the major chords if you want. they should all sound good if you use your ears a little.
Last edited by Coagulation at Jun 30, 2010,
#3
Quote by Coagulation
Minor pentatonic


Thats not what i asked. What do i run over a minor penatonic scale read my question
#4
Most blues progressions are major, and you use a minor penatonic scale over it. It gives a really "bluesy" sound to it. So first try using the B minor penatonic over the blues in B major.

If you wanted to play a blues in B minor, you could just do the same backing as one in B major, but change all the majors to minors. Ie. Use the chords B minor, E minor and F# minor to make the chord progression.

But most importantly you should learn about keys, and what chords go with which key, and the associated scales with each key. This will help you with these sorts of problems in the future.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Quote by AlanHB
Most blues progressions are major, and you use a minor penatonic scale over it. It gives a really "bluesy" sound to it. So first try using the B minor penatonic over the blues in B major.

If you wanted to play a blues in B minor, you could just do the same backing as one in B major, but change all the majors to minors. Ie. Use the chords B minor, E minor and F# minor to make the chord progression.

But most importantly you should learn about keys, and what chords go with which key, and the associated scales with each key. This will help you with these sorts of problems in the future.



Where can i learn about the keys and chords and scales
#8
You can use a minor pentatonic scale anywhere you can use the aeolian (natural minor), dorian, or phrygian modes (aka the minor modes)

You can use the natural minor over minor 7th, minor 9th, and minor 11th chords.
You can use the dorian mode over minor 7th and minor 9th chords.
You can use the phrygian mode over minor 7th chords.

This should go without saying, but you can use any of the minor modes over a minor triad (aka your typical B minor chord) too.

So, to summarize, you can use the minor pentatonic scale over minor triads, minor 7ths, minor 9ths, and minor 11ths.

PS: These aren't the only ways you can use these modes and scales - experiment.
Last edited by STONESHAKER at Jun 30, 2010,
#9
Quote by STONESHAKER
You can use a minor pentatonic scale anywhere you can use the aeolian (natural minor), dorian, or phrygian modes (aka the minor modes)

You can use the natural minor over minor 7th, minor 9th, and minor 11th chords.
You can use the dorian mode over minor 7th and minor 9th chords.
You can use the phrygian mode over minor 7th chords.

This should go without saying, but you can use any of the minor modes over a minor triad (aka your typical B minor chord) too.

So, to summarize, you can use the minor pentatonic scale over minor triads, minor 7ths, minor 9ths, and minor 11ths.

PS: These aren't the only ways you can use these modes and scales - experiment.


Hello matey, and welcome to UG and the MT forum. One of the first things you'll learn upon arriving here is that those things you think are modes, are not modes.

Now at this point it's not exactly clear whether you think they are different scales or different positions of the same scale, but we'll start at the start. Modes can only be employed in modal music. What is modal music? Well it doesn't have many chords, and is rarely used in music today. Now is the blues modal? Nope, of course not. It's in the key of B minor (that you already know).

Now given that the blues is in B minor, what scales can we use? Well unfortunately all your fancy phrygians and stuff will be thrown out the window because you'll always be playing some form of the B minor scale. Now you could add/swap some notes here and there, but the resulting scale would be a B minor scale with some extra notes, rather than some special name.

So TS please ignore the above advice relating to modes, it's incorrect to that extent. You can play the B minor penatonic at any time during a song in the key of B minor.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#10
Quote by AlanHB
Hello matey, and welcome to UG and the MT forum. One of the first things you'll learn upon arriving here is that those things you think are modes, are not modes.

Now at this point it's not exactly clear whether you think they are different scales or different positions of the same scale, but we'll start at the start. Modes can only be employed in modal music. What is modal music? Well it doesn't have many chords, and is rarely used in music today. Now is the blues modal? Nope, of course not. It's in the key of B minor (that you already know).

Now given that the blues is in B minor, what scales can we use? Well unfortunately all your fancy phrygians and stuff will be thrown out the window because you'll always be playing some form of the B minor scale. Now you could add/swap some notes here and there, but the resulting scale would be a B minor scale with some extra notes, rather than some special name.

So TS please ignore the above advice relating to modes, it's incorrect to that extent. You can play the B minor penatonic at any time during a song in the key of B minor.


my presence in this thread has been made redundant.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#11
Quote by AeolianWolf
my presence in this thread has been made redundant.

You're still good company!
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#12
Basic blues


Major Blues

The standard blues progression is I7-IV7-V7, in B major this would be B7-E7-F#7.

Now the typical thing to do with this is play the minor pentatonic scale of the same root as the chord you are playing over, for example, over the B7 you play B minor pentatonic and over E7 you play the E minor pentatonic etc.

The next thing to do is that whenever you play the minor 3rd degree, you either bend it up a half step to the major third, or bend it a quarter step up. You can also bend the b7th up a quarter step where desired.

Finally, a common occurrence is the b5 as a 'bluesy' passing tone. Over the B chord this would be F, over E it would be Bb and over F# it would be C.

Minor blues

Basically the same deal but the new progression would be i-iv-v (or V) but it is very common to use an alt chord for the V, which means that either a b5, #5, b9 or #9 is used, so you should alter your playing accordingly (commonly this is just called something like V alt, and it's up to you to either discern what is being played or how you will play it).

The turn around

Usually comprises of a quick-fire sequence of chords to get back to the tonic, and as the go past pretty quickly and involve chromaticism, it's common to just walk down/up to the root through hitting chord tones of each chord.

And as always, use you ears to see what sounds right/good, don't think "Am I allowed to do this?".
#13
^good post^
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#14
Quote by AeolianWolf
my presence in this thread has been made redundant.


Aww thanx.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#15
Literally anything. The pentatonic scales are so stable that you can play them almost over anything without trouble
#16
Quote by YoungTigre
If I am playing 12 bar blues in B Major i can simple run the B major pentatonic scale over it. What if im playing Bm pentatonic scale how do i play blues in b Minor?


let me make it clear this time!
What im asking is HOW DO I PLAY 12 BAR BLUES IN B MINOR


Bm7 to Em7 To F#7#9 Those will be your i vi and V(alt)

You can also do -

Bm7 Em7 Bm7 Em7 Gmaj7 F#7#9 back to Bm7 to resolve again on F#7#9

Best,

Sean
#17
I am thinking of making some simple loops to noodle over but wonder if I need to do more.I'm a fan the Allman Brothers. I tend to use a single minor pentatonic scale when improvising over the I-IV-V chords but, to my ear, the major pentatonic doesn't seem as suited to this approach. Do I need to start switching scales over each change?
Last edited by expt at Jul 2, 2010,
#18
Quote by expt
I am thinking of making some simple loops to noodle over but wonder if I need to do more.I'm a fan the Allman Brothers. I tend to use a single minor pentatonic scale when improvising over the I-IV-V chords but, to my ear, the major pentatonic doesn't seem as suited to this approach. Do I need to start switching scales over each change?

You have to realize that when you switch chords, the effect of each note in the scale changes. So a riff you might use over the I chord might not sound great over the V chord. You have to let your ears guide you ultimately. Keep experimenting!
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#19
Quote by expt
I am thinking of making some simple loops to noodle over but wonder if I need to do more.I'm a fan the Allman Brothers. I tend to use a single minor pentatonic scale when improvising over the I-IV-V chords but, to my ear, the major pentatonic doesn't seem as suited to this approach. Do I need to start switching scales over each change?


the major scale doesn't sound good to you over a I-IV-V? that's a problem.

no, you don't switch scales. if you have a I-IV-V in A, you use an A scale over all three chords. what notes you target, however, make all the difference.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#20
Quote by AeolianWolf
the major scale doesn't sound good to you over a I-IV-V? that's a problem.

no, you don't switch scales. if you have a I-IV-V in A, you use an A scale over all three chords. what notes you target, however, make all the difference.


Good point. For example targeting the 4 (D) over the A major would sound really dissonant and sour, because of the clash with the C# (Maj 3rd). I could see why running over the D at any point even as a passing tone, while over A Major where the C# is clearly present, would sound like a temporary "clash".

Best,

Sean