#1
Okay, so my guitar teacher also teaches singing. Now since I'd like to learn to sing sooner or later, I asked him to switch my last guitar lesson into a singing one. Basically he gave me pointers on how to start out with the right technique and he gave me some exercises.

A few things I don't completely understand:

1. Breathe from the diaphragm. Breathe in and your belly will expand. When you breathe out you should keep it expanded. Why is this?

2. Sing nasally. Now flatten your tongue and press it against the bottom front teeth. This should make the air go out the top front teeth. Why is this necessary?

Thanks!

Also, my range is pretty small: from A2 to D3. It will expand right? Most popular songs I want to sing have their highest note somewhere on or between E3 and G3.
#2
it all has to do with how the air resonates through your body
its easier to make a louder clearer note with more air think of an acoustic guitar with a bigger body
the teeth thing i think its easier to make clearer notes on a hard surface tap a pillow and then tap a hard table
this is just what i think im sure someone can give a better explanation
#3
Quote by Captain Panda
1. Breathe from the diaphragm. Breathe in and your belly will expand. When you breathe out you should keep it expanded. Why is this?
Two words: Diaphragm support.

You're going to want to support your sound with the strength of your diaphragm. This will allow you to avoid forcing out the sound by tensing up your throat, which will A) sound bad and B) be harmful to your vocal chords, plus you get a lot more power with proper diaphragm support. Not that you want to push with your diaphragm, this isn't so good either. You just want it there to support your sound.

Quote by Captain Panda
2. Sing nasally. Now flatten your tongue and press it against the bottom front teeth. This should make the air go out the top front teeth. Why is this necessary?
Supersac explained it pretty well. This is all about resonance as well. You're directing your resonance out of your throat and onto your hard palate (the hard part of the roof of your mouth right by your teeth; image). Like supersac said, it's easier to get clearer resonance on a hard surface (such as bone, e.g. your teeth, hard palate) than on a soft surface (such as skin/muscle tissue, e.g. your soft palate, throat).

Hope that makes sense.

Quote by Captain Panda
Also, my range is pretty small: from A2 to D3. It will expand right? Most popular songs I want to sing have their highest note somewhere on or between E3 and G3.
My bet is that your range is larger than that, you just haven't learned how to use it yet. Proper technique should fix this.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#4
Okay thanks you two

Also, I just had a great singing session and I measured my range again: I can do G/G#2 - E3 if I really focus my diaphragm on the highest note. I can also go all the way down to E2 on my guitar but I can't sing loudly beyond G/G#2.

Anyways, my questions have been answered, thanks!

EDIT: Now I'm not sure whether I noted the range correctly... It went from open A string to 3rd fret on the b string originally, and now I can go from the third/fourth fret on the low E all the way to the open high E.
Last edited by Captain Panda at Jun 30, 2010,
#5
Quote by Captain Panda
Okay thanks you two

Also, I just had a great singing session and I measured my range again: I can do G/G#2 - E3 if I really focus my diaphragm on the highest note. I can also go all the way down to E2 on my guitar but I can't sing loudly beyond G/G#2.

Anyways, my questions have been answered, thanks!

EDIT: Now I'm not sure whether I noted the range correctly... It went from open A string to 3rd fret on the b string originally, and now I can go from the third/fourth fret on the low E all the way to the open high E.
That would be G2 to E4. That's pretty normal. Around two octaves is pretty standard for most singers.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#6
I agree with most of Food's answer.

Except the part about singing nasally and pressing the tongue downward or forward on the teeth.

See, the rationale was fine - the idea of wanting to aim the voice at the hard palate and all - but the approach is really wrong. You don't want to do anything that disturbs the jaw unnecessarily, as it will both create tension and disturb the line of the voice. (ie. the consistency of tone)

The tongue should just do what it does when you speak. That's it. You don't want to try to sound nasal and then implement a counter-strategy to fix it, all in one motion. That's entirely unnecessary and counter-productive. You should be aiming for a pleasing and consistent tone, along with a relaxed tongue, mouth, and throat.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Okay, so make the tongue and jaw feel natural but focus the outgoing air to go out of your mouth at the top. Thanks