#1
..But I do need an answer hehe.

How much theory should be included in improvisation?

I ask simply because, at the moment, my guitar solos in songs all sound the same. I understand that this is a very common situation, and I have been thinking about practicing a lot more with regards to learning new rhythm values, such as quintuplets, to incorporate into solos.
However, I have never really spent time just sitting and hitting notes without over analyzing where I could go with it. While this is a much more composition-based style of lead playing, I fear it is why I have become stuck in a rut.

Will learning more theory, especially that of rhythmic values, help me to come up with new lead lines, or should I simply spend time bashing out notes to a backing track?
Will listening to new types of music help my playing, as well? At the moment, I try and solo with a lot of "feeling", but I have recently joined a band, and while trying to improvise to one of the songs, everything I tried playing over it in that style just sounded out of place..

PLEASE HELP!!
Quote by strat0blaster
HA!

Well played, my friend.

I'm going to edit that awful grammar right now


Yay, I'm sigged!!
And a grammar nazi..
#2
I guess the best idea is to just keep learning solos by other artists
it'll give you ideas for patterns and licks etc.
But yes constantly bashing out notes to backing tracks does help
it sounds messy but it's how I learnt in particular
And if you want to learn a more melodic way of improvising
think of the chords that play under it and use the chordtones (notes that are included in the chords)
and listen to, and play, as many styles of music as possible but also learn to understand the relationship between lead parts and the backing

best I can do sorry
#3
well, the answer to that question is subjective, really.

think of improvisation like everyday speech in your native language (let's say english, because your grammar is actually quite good). when you're asked a question, you don't stop and think, computing the meaning of every word in the sentence and then trying to understand it as a whole. it simply clicks, and you give a response appropriate to the nature of the previous statement or question.

it comes very naturally because you've had a lot of experience with proper english. you've studied grammar, you've studied spelling (doesn't quite help you here, but good to know), you've studied sentence formation, parts of speech, and everything necessary to make a correct, cohesive sentence. in music, there is nothing objectively "correct", but that doesn't mean it's wise to neglect thorough knowledge of the basics. just as you are knowledgeable in those techniques required for proper english, there are things you must understand in order to improvise well. you must know the musical alphabet as if it were your native script. you must know chord construction and scale construction. you must be well versed in harmony. you must know how to construct a cohesive melody - perhaps even over jarred, uncommon chord changes; ideally, all of these things should be second nature to you.

learning more theory, quite honestly, is your best bet to become a fluent guitarist. but by itself, that won't do it. you have to apply what you know, and most importantly, you have to listen. listen carefully to the music the rest of the band is playing, and listen carefully to what you're contributing to it. listening to a variety of genres can also help - just like languages have dialects, different genres have idiomatic playing, i.e. what sounds good in one genre might not quite fit in another.

as far as playing with "feeling" goes, i have to say one thing: sometimes (just slightly more often than not, like a 51:49 ratio), i notice that when people say they play with "feeling", it's usually an excuse to avoid learning music theory out of some idea of contempt of it (someone said this in another thread -- i forget your name right now, but if you're reading this, then yes, you). if that's not the case for you, then disregard what i'm talking about, because playing with feeling in a true sense is excellent musicianship.

basically, you need to do only four things:

1) listen
2) learn
3) analyze
4) understand

once you've done those four things, you can apply anything (and i mean, quite liberally, ANYTHING) to your playing.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
The best form of improving your soloing is to practise. Music theory is just a catalyse.
Q: What's the difference between a Mexican standard tele and an American standard tele?

A: £600
#5
Quote by sTarbuck
..But I do need an answer hehe.

How much theory should be included in improvisation?

I ask simply because, at the moment, my guitar solos in songs all sound the same. I understand that this is a very common situation, and I have been thinking about practicing a lot more with regards to learning new rhythm values, such as quintuplets, to incorporate into solos.
However, I have never really spent time just sitting and hitting notes without over analyzing where I could go with it. While this is a much more composition-based style of lead playing, I fear it is why I have become stuck in a rut.


You only need as much theory that you think you need. Of course, knowing more and being able to apply it is ideal (most great shredders/solo-ers know a good deal of theory and can apply it on the fly), but you don't need to know a crapload.

What is the ideal situation is if you know what chords are there, you know what you can do over them. This is where the theory comes in. You can't use your ear with something you haven't heard yet, so being able to say "an A minor chord is coming up, this shape/lick/feel/sound/note/whatever I want will sound good over this" and then when you get there you already know what you're going to do before you get there. Of course, once you get there you can change your mind, but it's good to have an idea of what to do beforehand.

Will learning more theory, especially that of rhythmic values, help me to come up with new lead lines, or should I simply spend time bashing out notes to a backing track?
Will listening to new types of music help my playing, as well? At the moment, I try and solo with a lot of "feeling", but I have recently joined a band, and while trying to improvise to one of the songs, everything I tried playing over it in that style just sounded out of place..

PLEASE HELP!!

Don't worry about rhythmic values; worry about rhythm. The values don't matter unless you're trying to transcribe the solo. Just play.

Of course listening to new music will help your playing! It will open your mind to what's out there. There are 3 or 4 very influential players that have seriously influenced my playing: Guthrie Govan, Michael Romeo, Paul Masvidal, and maybe Allan Holdsworth. Two of these are Jazzists and two are metal (one is a jazz/metal fusion). They all bring different things to the table and I learned a lot from them.

For new rhythms, listen to the drums. Focus on the drums of the songs you listen to. They usually have a lot of interesting rhythms and you can get good ideas from them.
#6
Guitar playing is an art. An art which requires sheer practice for perfection. I have seen a lot of rhythm, lead and base guitarists who are complete psychos when it comes to practice hours. i am specially amazed by the way base guitarists play with the nodes. They put a sensational amount of freshness into the song and off late i have seen that base is in. Its the most amazing way to show some innovation nowadays.