#1
I have been loving the sound and feel of the Lonestar Strats at my local guitar centers and can get them to lower the price to $400.

But now I am realizing that all my favorite guitarists use Ibanez guitars.
People like Satriani, Vai, Gambale, Gilbert, Moore, Reb Beach.

Reasons I like the Lonestar Strat:
Can get bluesy "pop-like" sounds
Has humbucker so can do rock
$400
but it doesn't do metal very well.

Reasons I like Ibanez:
Superfast neck
Can do metal
Sounds really smooth
More frets

but the clean and blues/clean arent exactly what I want.

Should I stick with the Lonestar or is there an Ibanez solidbody that can still sound bluesy?
#2
Any guitar can sound like anything if you have an appropriate amp and if you're willing to change out relevant hardware and electronics. I play blues on my super-Strat all the time, and equally I've played metal on my Lone Star Strat.

My advice would be to just try out the guitars you're thinking of, see which feels best in your hands. That's the most important thing. Tone can be changed, hardware can be changed, electronics can be changed; the feel of a guitar can't be changed.
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#3
Please don't use the phrase "fast neck" - there is no such thing. There are fast players, not fast necks. Also Ibanez guitars don't sound "smooth" - again this is the player.

Steve Vai could play ANYTHING and sound like Steve Vai.
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#4
Quote by MrFlibble
Any guitar can sound like anything if you have an appropriate amp and if you're willing to change out relevant hardware and electronics. I play blues on my super-Strat all the time, and equally I've played metal on my Lone Star Strat.

My advice would be to just try out the guitars you're thinking of, see which feels best in your hands. That's the most important thing. Tone can be changed, hardware can be changed, electronics can be changed; the feel of a guitar can't be changed.


This, the lonestar is a nice guitar and the pearly gates in the bridge (I think) might surprise you.
However if you're looking for an ibanez get (or save up for) an Ibanez S, even the cheapest one comes with the ZR which is a freaking amazing trem. Very good all round guitars.
#5
like the people above said, its all about the players and their set ups. but i like ibanez' guitars, i own an RG350M and its nice and light nd has a relatively thin neck, wich i like
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#6
Quote by --ESTRANGED--
like the people above said, its all about the players and their set ups. but i like ibanez' guitars, i own an RG350M and its nice and light nd has a relatively thin neck, wich i like


I too own an RG350 and would have to advise against this, the trem although not as bad as most will attest is not worth the money. I though it was good at first but regret buying it now. I no longer use it at all and don't even feel it's worth upgrading with better hardware.
#7
Quote by MrFlibble
Any good amp can make any guitar sound like anything if you're willing to change out relevant hardware and electronics.


Fixed/Made easier on the eyes.
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#9
Quote by ChucklesMginty


Yes there are fast necks,

Try playing a difficult scale run on a thin necked modern guitar, the on a Les Paul. It's so much easier, maybe a great guitarist should be able to play on any guitar. But there's no point make things more difficult.

Yes the they sound smoother too (well depending on the model, it's more down to the amp), again maybe a fantastic player could make any guitar sound smooth. But what's the point of buying a harsh sounding guitar and telling yourself if you were a better player it would sound smoother.


Not to be a jerk...but that's completely wrong, and advice that new players should ignore. A fast neck is determined by what a PLAYER is comfortable with. If I have big a hands, a chunky neck like a 50's Les Paul (60's LP's are very thin actually) might be what you feel best with. Tell Buckethead his Les Paul is slowing him down, or tell Stevie his incredibly thick necks are holding him back.

Smooth - again a ridiculous claim. First of all the term "smooth" doesn't actually mean anything. I assume he is referring to Legato, which has NOTHING to do with neck, pickups, pedals, amps, etc. It's 100% the players ability.
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#10
not to be a jerk... but you're definitely coming off as one yourself and are making it seem as if you're 100% right
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#11
Quote by handlerb
Not to be a jerk...but that's completely wrong, and advice that new players should ignore. A fast neck is determined by what a PLAYER is comfortable with. If I have big a hands, a chunky neck like a 50's Les Paul (60's LP's are very thin actually) might be what you feel best with. Tell Buckethead his Les Paul is slowing him down, or tell Stevie his incredibly thick necks are holding him back.

Not really, no. I'm going with ChucklesMginty on the fast neck thing. I play a Les Paul Studio, and the neck is pretty thick (depth, not width), and when I play my friend's Ibanez, I can play fast leads a lot cleaner, as it has a thinner neck. Now, for a player like Buckethead, it doesn't matter as much, and it comes down to what he feels more comfortable with. But for most guitarists, a thinner neck will be referred to as a faster neck.
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#12
Quote by Uber_Kitty
I have been loving the sound and feel of the Lonestar Strats at my local guitar centers and can get them to lower the price to $400.

But now I am realizing that all my favorite guitarists use Ibanez guitars.
People like Satriani, Vai, Gambale, Gilbert, Moore, Reb Beach.

Reasons I like the Lonestar Strat:
Can get bluesy "pop-like" sounds
Has humbucker so can do rock
$400
but it doesn't do metal very well.

Reasons I like Ibanez:
Superfast neck
Can do metal
Sounds really smooth
More frets

but the clean and blues/clean arent exactly what I want.

Should I stick with the Lonestar or is there an Ibanez solidbody that can still sound bluesy?

Ibanez JS1000.
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#13
Quote by Dream Floyd
Fixed/Made easier on the eyes.
Except not because now you've changed the content.

Quote by ChucklesMginty


Yes there are fast necks,

Try playing a difficult scale run on a thin necked modern guitar, the on a Les Paul. It's so much easier, maybe a great guitarist should be able to play on any guitar. But there's no point make things more difficult.
Doug Aldrich would like a word with you.

Speed comes form your hand being relaxed. Your hand is most relaxed when it is supported properly. For some people that means a thin neck, for other people it means a thick neck. Some people need a flat neck for their hand to be relaxed, other peopel need a rounded neck to relax. Some people even need V-shaped necks. Some people need a wide fretboard, others need a narrow one; some people need a flat radius, others need a very rounded one. Some people can't wrap their hand around a thick neck with a wide fretboard properly, other people get very painful and potentially permanently damaging hand cramps from playing on a neck that is too thin and narrow.

There is absolutely no such thing as a be-all end-all ''fast'' or ''slow'' neck. Speed, comfort and playability are all entirely subjective to each person's individual preferences and sheer physical limitations. There are thick necks, average-thickness necks and thin necks. There are wide necks, average-width necks and narrow necks. There are D, C, U, V, soft-V and medium-V profiles. There are flat fretboards, compound radius fretboards, average-radius fretboards and steeply curved radius fretboards. There is tall fretwire, low fretwire, wide fretwire, narrow fretwire, average-width fretwire and average-height fretwire. There are high nuts, medium nuts and low nuts. There is low string tension, high string tension and standard string tension. There is low action, high action and standard action.

There is no ''fast'' anything.

Yes the they sound smoother too (well depending on the model, it's more down to the amp), again maybe a fantastic player could make any guitar sound smooth. But what's the point of buying a harsh sounding guitar and telling yourself if you were a better player it would sound smoother.
A smooth tone comes from a thick neck, preferably with a rosewood fretboard. Not exactly very typical of Ibanez. Yes, with the right modifications you could get a smoother tone out of a typical Ibanez guitar, but then you're looking at buying a guitar and modding the hell out of it vs just buying a guitar.
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#14
Quote by ChucklesMginty
Buckethead has impeccable technique, for less experienced players it would be harder. Just because he likes the tone of a Les Paul and possibly a thicker neck (even though his signature model is slightly thinner neck.) That does not mean it's easier.


Bullshit.

The term 'smooth' means a warm sound without a lot of sharp edges. Generally achieved by using the neck pickup, using a lot of distortion for extra sustain, dialling in a warm sounding with lots of mids and bass on your amp and less high-end.

The player comes in by the way he picks (where along the length of the string and how hard.)

Example of smooth tone: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDZuNM3HmU4


I won't even get into, but the word smooth already has a meaning...which has nothing to do with guitar tone. It is applied metaphorically to sound, and therefore subjective.

BUT going with what you said above, "smooth" tone would be achieved with a THICKER neck.
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#15
You guys are looking too far into terminologies.

Terms for sound are mostly subjective but often are used to describe the same qualities.

To most people, a fast neck means a thin neck.
To most people a smooth sounding guitar is just a guitar that is easier to dial in a smooth tone on the amp.

Instead of saying "______ is nothing, its all in the player's ability and setup," you can just answer the questions.

For the same reason you don't correct the term "tremello bar," you should not correct terms like "smooth" "fast" "metal sounding" etc.

Since I am talking about buying a more expensive guitar, assume I have been playing for a while and that I know basic ideas like "its all in how you play."
Last edited by Uber_Kitty at Jun 30, 2010,
#16
ive started playing a super-strat style guitar more recently. it is on its way toward becoming my main(ish) guitar. with coil tapped humbuckers you can start getting a bit of the blusey sound of your more traditional strat. of course it isnt really the same, but it gets you something.

but if you want a guitar that can go from blues-pop to hard rock to some metal, then a super strat is a nice choice. if you want to get that single coil sound a strat is known for, the fat strat is your better choice. some of the schecter c-1 guitars might suit you. not quite a super strat as it has a shorter scale length and such. but i feel that schecter guitars in the $4-500 range are probably a better buy than ibanez guitars in a similar range. at a little bit higher price bracket, you could probably get an ibanez that would suit you well.
#17
Quote by handlerb
Please don't use the phrase "fast neck" - there is no such thing. There are fast players, not fast necks. Also Ibanez guitars don't sound "smooth" - again this is the player.

Steve Vai could play ANYTHING and sound like Steve Vai.


This. This entire post.

And it's kinda funny you say that, one of Vai's favorite guitars is his strat.(Clicky)

So it's basically up to you which guitar you want.
#18
I've grown to despise thin necks. When I first started playing a few years ago I kept noticing how everyone bragged about fast necks, so I thought I needed one too. So I got a superstrat with a very thin, fast neck. Now that I've progressed out of the bedroom playing stage and actually play out with a band, I don't even bring this guitar with me. When playing in a band context I realized that all of those scales and soloing skills I had been practising only occupied about 5% of the song. The other 95% consisted of a ton of bar chords. That thin, fast neck that I thought was so desirable turned out to be a bitch. My hand would cramp unbearably half way through a song. I've moved on to thick, full C shape necks and have never been happier with the comfort. Just my experience.
#19
Quote by Uber_Kitty

For the same reason you don't correct the term "tremello bar," you should not correct terms like "smooth" "fast" "metal sounding" etc.
If you take a look around these forums, we do correct those sorts of terms here. At the very least we always try to get some proper classification on what the person means because ''metal'' to one person is another person's ''rock'' and ''tremolo'' and ''vibrato'' are two very different effects, same with ''coil split'' and ''coil tap'', ''distortion'' and ''overdrive''.

To that end, it really is all down to you. Based on what you've told us so far, all we can do is re-affirm what you've already said; the Lone Star is a decent price and is naturally a bit better at blues-style tones, most typical Ibanez guitars are more naturally suited to metal-style tones. That's it. If you want objective opinions on which you should buy, you really need to be much more specific about what it is you want. Even then, nobody can really tell you which is better, the best way to figure out which you should buy still comes down to you playing them and deciding for yourself. Nobody here minds helping out but you need to be more precise before anyone can even begin to have much of an opinion on what may or may not work for you.
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#20
Quote by MrFlibble
Any guitar can sound like anything if you have an appropriate amp and if you're willing to change out relevant hardware and electronics.

This. Never discount the ability of guitars that "aren't right for the genre" to be perfect.
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#21
Quote by MrFlibble
If you take a look around these forums, we do correct those sorts of terms here. At the very least we always try to get some proper classification on what the person means because ''metal'' to one person is another person's ''rock'' and ''tremolo'' and ''vibrato'' are two very different effects, same with ''coil split'' and ''coil tap'', ''distortion'' and ''overdrive''.

To that end, it really is all down to you. Based on what you've told us so far, all we can do is re-affirm what you've already said; the Lone Star is a decent price and is naturally a bit better at blues-style tones, most typical Ibanez guitars are more naturally suited to metal-style tones. That's it. If you want objective opinions on which you should buy, you really need to be much more specific about what it is you want. Even then, nobody can really tell you which is better, the best way to figure out which you should buy still comes down to you playing them and deciding for yourself. Nobody here minds helping out but you need to be more precise before anyone can even begin to have much of an opinion on what may or may not work for you.


Thanks for the advice. I thought I was pretty clear with my questions because you answered them moderately well.

To be even more precise, should I eliminate easy to dial metal tones by getting a strat just to get that blues tone, or can superstrats (give specific lines or models) get that blues tone and thus solve my problem.
#22
if u like and want a guitar u can afford, get it, y do u wanna sound like ur idols? i mean that is pretty obvious, but stand out of the crowd, sound unique, sound BETTER (for ur opinion) the only opinion for tone that matters is ur own, go play that lonestar and then next hand play and ibanez u want as well and compare tones and feel, whichever u want more get it
Eh.
#23
Quote by Uber_Kitty
or can superstrats (give specific lines or models) get that blues tone and thus solve my problem.


if you're still taking guitar suggestions i'd say you should look into old used RG's. old made in japan RG's are amazing. RG570's can be found on ebay sometimes for around the $400 you're looking for. i loved mine for everything. with the way that they split the pickups with a 5 way switch you can get GREAT clean tones, along with nice lead and humbucking tones.

they're ridiculously versatile guitars. i got tired of mine because i realized that the thin neck was really cramping my hand, but some people find them extremely comfortable. go try out a few of the prestige models at a GC or something and you'll know if the wizard neck is for you or not
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#24
Quote by ChucklesMginty


Yes there are fast necks,

Try playing a difficult scale run on a thin necked modern guitar, the on a Les Paul. It's so much easier, maybe a great guitarist should be able to play on any guitar. But there's no point make things more difficult.

Yes the they sound smoother too (well depending on the model, it's more down to the amp), again maybe a fantastic player could make any guitar sound smooth. But what's the point of buying a harsh sounding guitar and telling yourself if you were a better player it would sound smoother.

As for guitar recommendations I'd recommend an S series. I'm assuming you won't want a fixed bridge by your favourite artists, and the S guitars have a brilliant trem, he RGs all have Edge IIIs (apart from the high end stuff) which don't stay in tune very well.


I consider myself a beginner, been playing for only a few years.
I honestly can play faster on a thick neck as opposed to a thin neck. When I play on a thin neck (Like my friend's Ibanez Prestige for instance), I get a lot of pain, and in order to play comfortably, I have to play much slower than usual. On the other hand, when I play on my Burny (Gibson thick neck), my hands fit very comfortably and I can play at faster speeds, without getting pain in my hand.
Most people I know do prefer to play on Ibanez, and they play faster on them. However, I really cannot play on them comfortably. For me, a fast neck is Gibson.
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#25
Quote by ChucklesMginty


Yes there are fast necks,

Try playing a difficult scale run on a thin necked modern guitar, the on a Les Paul. It's so much easier, maybe a great guitarist should be able to play on any guitar. But there's no point make things more difficult.

Yes the they sound smoother too (well depending on the model, it's more down to the amp), again maybe a fantastic player could make any guitar sound smooth. But what's the point of buying a harsh sounding guitar and telling yourself if you were a better player it would sound smoother.

As for guitar recommendations I'd recommend an S series. I'm assuming you won't want a fixed bridge by your favourite artists, and the S guitars have a brilliant trem, he RGs all have Edge IIIs (apart from the high end stuff) which don't stay in tune very well.


No there are no such things as fast necks, the width of the neck has nothing to do with how fast you can play; have you ever seen any classical guitarists perform? The posture of your hand should be the same no matter how thick the neck is, it doesn't make a difference. The 'speed' of the neck is determined by things like radius, fret type, and action.
And no they don't sound smoother, they sound like any other guitar with humbuckers
Last edited by Vacuity at Jul 1, 2010,
#26
strats can do metal perfectly
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#27
Please don't use the phrase "fast neck" - there is no such thing. There are fast players, not fast necks. Also Ibanez guitars don't sound "smooth" - again this is the player.

Steve Vai could play ANYTHING and sound like Steve Vai.[/QUOTE]


dude, you must be the most smart person in class. really what a conclusion. if steve vai would not sound like steve vai would he still be steve vai? i'd say naa.

i go with mrflibble.
#28
Quote by Uber_Kitty

To be even more precise, should I eliminate easy to dial metal tones by getting a strat just to get that blues tone, or can superstrats (give specific lines or models) get that blues tone and thus solve my problem.
It can work both ways. Iron Maiden use Strats and nobody is going to tell them they're not metal. On the other hand, for what it's worth, I've got an LTD H-1001 - typical super-Strat with active EMG pickups - and I use it for blues and classic rock all the time, I very rarely use it for metal in fact. It really does just depend an awful lot on how you use the guitar, what your amp is and if you're willing to make any modifications to the guitar.

I know it can be annoying to not get a definitive answer, but you are trying to compare two quite similar styles of guitar that are both very versatile, so there really just isn't all that much in it. If you have a really average, mid-gain amp and you don't want to modify the guitar then yeah, you're picking between blues-oriented Strat or a metal-orientated super-Strat. But all it would take would be any of either a pickup change, a slightly different playing style or a higher gain/lower gain amp and with just one of those, your Strat could be playing metal just fine or the super-Strat could be playing blues. Neither of them is utterly incapable of playing the other's style.

So really, the big difference you've got to decide on is which neck you prefer. If you like the Ibanez neck better, get that. If you prefer the Fender neck, get that. Tone can always be altered and both are pretty versatile anyway; feel can't be altered. Play 'em both, buy based on the one that is most playable and most comfortable.
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#29
Quote by MrFlibble
It can work both ways. Iron Maiden use Strats and nobody is going to tell them they're not metal...

Not and live to tell the tale, anyway.
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#30
Besides a LP custom, my choice in guitars are American strat specials stock with a Floyd Rose. While I am not a shredder like Vai and Satriani I have seen strats used by those who can play like that. Personally for me, most Ibanez I have tried are uncomfortable, though I haven't tried all Ibanez.
#31
As MrFlibble has said this can really go both ways depending on what guitar you like the feel of most.

If you prefer the feel of the strat go for the strat. You could easily load it with some higher output single coils such as Bareknuckle "The Sinner" in the bridge or trilogy suites and get some unique metal tones out of it. Or of course go HSS and put a real ballsy humbucker in the bridge to balance out the highs of the alder. You would have a very versatile instrument then both capable of metal and blues.

On the other hand try out some HSH Ibanez S series guitars. There are quite a lot of blues players on youtube using these instruments and doing blues very well and for metal they are incredible. You could put some lower output humbuckers with coil tap in the guitar for more blues orientated but with unique metal tone or of course simply use a coil tap on high output humbuckers combined with the middle single coil to get your blues sound and still retain good metal tone.

These are all modifications to think of in the long term based upon which instrument feels most comfortable to you. I use an Ibanez S670 primarily loaded with Bareknuckle Warpigs and a Bareknuckle Trilogy Suite. All are high output. However on position 2 and 4 on the toggle switch...... Wow. Amazing blues tones to be had there and I'm running it into an ENGL!

Again it is mostly in the player and not just in the player regarding the playing of the instrument. Its in how well you know how to use your equipment too.
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