#1
So anyway I feel my practice routines are just becoming boring and I'm starting to get nothing out of them. I consider myself and intermediate player if that helps. I can play quite a few songs but as we know songs are just songs. So, here's my current routine:

1. Warm up with simple scales and try to hit every key and mostly major scales with some pentatonics thrown in and chromatics. About 30 minutes.

2. Once my hands are warmed up I do some simple finger picking exercises maybe for about 20 minutes.

3. Then I work on chord progressions in as many keys as I'm comfortable with and barre chords. The time varies between 30 min to an hour.

4. Then I work on songs for about an hour.

Generally I can devote around 3 hours a day to practicing however recently I have had a LOT of distractions and am practicing on both acoustic and electric. I would like to begin to incorporate some more advanced techniques like legato, sweep picking, etc. What am I doing wrong and why am I suddenly feeling like I'm at a standstill? Personally when I used to practice I locked myself in a quiet room with no distractions and devoted all my time to practicing. Recently though I've not been able to do that and I believe it has hurt my progress considerably. Any thoughts on the above or other suggestions?

I should note that I get extremely pissed off on days I can't practice and those seem to be becoming more frequent for whatever reason. I suppose I'm just getting frustrated. My goal is just to play the things I want to play and to understand guitar as much as possible both practically and in theory. I'm just beginning to feel a little overwhelmed and this hurts me being able to perfect things.
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GEAR:

Ibanez SGT520VS Sage Series Acoustic
Yamaha FG720S-12 12 String Acoustic
Schecter C-1 Classic
Crate Flexwave FW65 Combo Amp
#2
thats because the way youre practising, youre probably thinking of it as a chore, it should only be for fun. when it stops being fun, take a break.
Gear
Epiphone Sg special <---meh

Peavey Vypyr 30 <---awesome

Hello
#3
Try not to be militant about your practicing...if you're doing so much that it's becoming difficult to have a good practice, minimize. Reduce the load you're putting on yourself.

If you're not having fun while you're playing, you're doing it wrong. You need to ask yourself what do you need to do in order for it to be fun again? Maybe that means taking a less academic approach (IE scales/chord progressions) and just figure out a song instead.
#4
Don't practice for so long at time.
For example, some days i do 3-4 fours, but usually it's broken into three-four hour or more sessions. It helps me retain focus, and I get to go outside
Also, take a day off once a week and just go hang out. It helps me. Play guitar that day, but don't work on anything.
I don't care if you're into jazz or not, this article is pretty good-practice philosophy
#5
Quote by skywalker45

1. Warm up with simple scales and try to hit every key and mostly major scales with some pentatonics thrown in and chromatics. About 30 minutes.

2. Once my hands are warmed up I do some simple finger picking exercises maybe for about 20 minutes.

3. Then I work on chord progressions in as many keys as I'm comfortable with and barre chords. The time varies between 30 min to an hour.

4. Then I work on songs for about an hour.


You seem to have a pretty dedicated practice session, but it seems like you're doing things that won't really focus what you're trying to do. Here's some of my advice just to focus you're practice. You seem like you're trying to do everything at once and that's a hard thing to keep going at and to advance with.

1. First off, I would strip down your scale practice some. Playing through every key is pretty time consuming, boring, and may not help you that much. What I would do is pick a scale, for instance c major. Then play through each day doing a couple different picking exercises, like triplets on each note, sixteenth notes on each note, whole notes on each note to practice tone and vibrato. Then play arpeggio exercises or something on the scale. Next week, play another scale the same sort of way, but also practice the one you played the week before. Once you get through all the scales, just go back and practice them again in different orders. This takes less than you are spending and I think it'll help you more than just playing through random scales.

2. I see nothing wrong with this, just make sure you vary it. I mean, practice a couple each week that you already know, just to keep them up, but maybe every week or two weeks, add a new one to make sure you stay challenged. Just don't get super bogged down on them and make sure the rhythm is right.

3. This I would combine with scale practice. When you're playing scales, play the chord progressions that go with the scale you are practicing. It's similar to arpeggio exercises where it'll just help you get more familiar with the fingerboard in a not quite so linear way, like scales do.

4. Just make sure you keep finding songs that interest you and challenge you. Even if there is a song that is challenging, but you don't find it fun to play or nice to listen to, I would skip, at least for now when you're feeling annoyed with you're practice. This is what you want to do and your reward on all the warm up work you're doing, make sure it's fun.

Good luck
#6
I have the same problem about practicing when I'm not in a room by myself. Way too many distractions. Most days I just don't play at all because other people are home. It's just pointless to try and play when I'm going to be interrupted so much, either by thought or talking to people.
#7
Quote by Exodus04
I have the same problem about practicing when I'm not in a room by myself. Way too many distractions. Most days I just don't play at all because other people are home. It's just pointless to try and play when I'm going to be interrupted so much, either by thought or talking to people.


If you play electric...get some headphones. You practice, and block everything out.
Wants: PRS Starla
#8
Quote by weewilly79
If you play electric...get some headphones. You practice, and block everything out.


Hmm I'd like to try that, can anyone recommend a good, but still relatively inexpensive way for me to do this? I have an old box I can plug my guitar into that has headphones out, but it sounds like complete shit when I play.

Also to the OP: it just sounds like you're really trying to do too much of the same every day. You could try dividing your practice up into 2 or 3 groups and then alternate those every day - kind of like alternating a workout routine. First day you work on "a" and "b" then some songs, the next day you work on "c" and "d" and some songs, and just keep alternating. I'm not good at sticking to routines, but it sounds like you are pretty good at doing that so this may work for you!
Last edited by Exodus04 at Jul 1, 2010,