#1
I know there is probably a simple fix to my problem, but whenever i plug my acoustic-electric into my amp (made for electric), there is this aweful noise when i turn up the volume. And if i want to put on a little distortion, all of the strings sound the same. Also, if i put my electtric guitar on a clean channel, there is no background fuzz (obviously)....but my acoustic-electric has terrible fuzz. And whenever i touch the wire that is right inside the guitar, the fuzz goes away!

WHY??????????????????????
#2
Because its not meant for a electric guitar amp?
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#3
Quote by Anthony1991
Because its not meant for a electric guitar amp?


i realize that...but i do know tthat an acoustic-electric will souund just fine on an electric amp if the pickups are right...because my 12 string plays just fine on that amp
#4
Quote by Anthony1991
Because its not meant for a electric guitar amp?



this...

go spend $100 bucks and get an acoustic amp.
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#5
Am I guessing right that the problem acoustic has a built-in piezoelectric system, and the 12-string has a soundhole pickup?

The noise you're hearing is feedback, which is basically the electronics picking up their own sound. That's just what you get when you amplify hollow-bodied instruments like acoustic guitars at high volumes. Acoustic guitar amplifiers are designed with this in mind, and generally include some kind of feedback suppression technology. Now, there are other alternatives -- including "feedback busters" you plug inside the soundhole -- but those are only so effective.

Regarding the tone, electric guitar amps are designed to work with regular magnetic pickups. Acoustic amps, on the other hand, are specifically designed for piezoelectric systems like you see in acoustic guitars. They don't color the tone as much as an electric amp, or at least not in the same way. Bass and keyboard amps also work well with acoustics, because they're also designed for flat, even frequency response, but generally don't include the anti-feedback stuff.

Distortion does not work well with the piezoelectric pickup sound. Someone who knows the math and physics behind it could probably explain in terms of waveform shape or something like that, but I'll just leave it at "it doesn't sound pretty," because frankly it doesn't.

By the way, I guessed about the soundhole pickup because electronically, those are magnetic pickups like you'd see on an electric guitar. So if it is a soundhole pickup, that's why that one works and the other one doesn't.

TL;DR: That's not a problem, it's just what you get.
#6
Am I guessing right that the problem acoustic has a built-in piezoelectric system, and the 12-string has a soundhole pickup?

The noise you're hearing is feedback, which is basically the electronics picking up their own sound. That's just what you get when you amplify hollow-bodied instruments like acoustic guitars at high volumes. Acoustic guitar amplifiers are designed with this in mind, and generally include some kind of feedback suppression technology. Now, there are other alternatives -- including "feedback busters" you plug inside the soundhole -- but those are only so effective.

Regarding the tone, electric guitar amps are designed to work with regular magnetic pickups. Acoustic amps, on the other hand, are specifically designed for piezoelectric systems like you see in acoustic guitars. They don't color the tone as much as an electric amp, or at least not in the same way. Bass and keyboard amps also work well with acoustics, because they're also designed for flat, even frequency response, but generally don't include the anti-feedback stuff.

Distortion does not work well with the piezoelectric pickup sound. Someone who knows the math and physics behind it could probably explain in terms of waveform shape or something like that, but I'll just leave it at "it doesn't sound pretty," because frankly it doesn't.

By the way, I guessed about the soundhole pickup because electronically, those are magnetic pickups like you'd see on an electric guitar. So if it is a soundhole pickup, that's why that one works and the other one doesn't.

TL;DR: That's not a problem, it's just what you get. [/QUOTE

finally! someone with a good explanation!...would sitting farther away from the amp possibly help reduce feedback?
#7
Quote by crazycory94
finally! someone with a good explanation!...would sitting farther away from the amp possibly help reduce feedback?

It does help a little bit, but once you reach a certain volume it's just going to feed back no matter what. The acoustics of the room can really work against you -- I've gotten feedback standing on the other side of my bedroom, and that's with carpeted floors (soft surfaces absorb, rather than reflect sound).

Probably the best thing you can do, short of buying an acoustic amp, is to get one of the feedback busters I mentioned. Someone mentioned the Lute Hole cover in another thread, which I thought was really cool looking. They'll block a lot of sound from getting inside the instrument and resonating, which will cut back on feedback significantly.

I play an acoustic-electric bass, which is a real feedback monster. Here's by far the best advice I've seen online for that:
Quote by BgTckt on TalkBass
How to eliminate feedback in an acoustic bass:
1) Place the bass on a flat, hard, level surface.
2) Step back approximately 15 paces.
3) Grasp the accordion with both hands and, using a smooth, straight-arm, underhand swing, pitch the accordion so that it travels in a clean, high arc, landing squarely on the body of the acoustic bass.

It will never feed back again. (This will also fix any problems with the accordion sound.)
#8
Quote by Anthony1991
Because its not meant for a electric guitar amp?

Amplifiers do the same thing whether they were built for an acoustic or not. Current from magnets is no different from current generated by piezoelectric materials.

The easiest route to stopping feedback is to keep the volume down, step away from the amp, and face the soundhole away. The buzz is caused by electrical interference from crummy electronics.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Jul 2, 2010,