#1
Hi,

Trying to get my head around theory which is going well but i just have a quick question. Does truly knowing say the major scale and the chords made up from it mean that when playing you know in your head straight away things like "There are these notes here / they are x intervals apart / playing x notes will sound like x" etc.

I just feel I'm learning things but don't completely know how to apply them.

Thanks
#2
i do especially when writing or imporvising
its good to know how certain notes sound toghether
#3
i didnt learn any scales by the notes per say, i just know where everything is on the fretboard and that helps a lot.
#4
Quote by chrispantling
"There are these notes here / they are x intervals apart / playing x notes will sound like x" etc.


No, knowing major scale and chords derived from it does not mean that you have these skills. You will need to do two further things to achieve that:
1, learning all the pitches on the fretboard
2, going through some high quality ear training course
#5
I feel like thinking about it in this way isn't quite the way the mind works with skills - as an analogy, when driving, I don't think 'Begin braking, then put clutch down and shift into neutral', I just think "Shit, I'd better break!". At the beginning, however, I DID think exactly in terms of what I was doing.
In a roundabout way, what I'm trying to say is, spend part of your time figuring out where the intervals are, what they sound like, but I'd say a more productive way to spend your time is riffing around, jamming along to songs you know the key of etc, and after a while you'll start to get a sense of what to play when - personally, though I can't speak for anyone else, very little goes through my mind when I'm improvising or writing - if I think too much I often trip up under my own fingers. Instead, vauge concepts, like 'aggressive now' will come into my head, and I'll move towards the minor third or whatever.
Basically, don't worry too much about it, jam in scaleds, play around, and after a while you'll find music less like the logical form you described and more like a language.
#6
Quote by Sabscope
I feel like thinking about it in this way isn't quite the way the mind works with skills - as an analogy, when driving, I don't think 'Begin braking, then put clutch down and shift into neutral', I just think "Shit, I'd better break!". At the beginning, however, I DID think exactly in terms of what I was doing.
In a roundabout way, what I'm trying to say is, spend part of your time figuring out where the intervals are, what they sound like, but I'd say a more productive way to spend your time is riffing around, jamming along to songs you know the key of etc, and after a while you'll start to get a sense of what to play when - personally, though I can't speak for anyone else, very little goes through my mind when I'm improvising or writing - if I think too much I often trip up under my own fingers. Instead, vauge concepts, like 'aggressive now' will come into my head, and I'll move towards the minor third or whatever.
Basically, don't worry too much about it, jam in scaleds, play around, and after a while you'll find music less like the logical form you described and more like a language.
Couldn't have said it better myself.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Think of it this way-knowledge is never a bad thing. I have read interviews with guitarists who said they didn't want to learn theory, scales and whatnot because they felt it would make their music follow 'rules' and sound a certain way. That is the stupidest thing I have ever heart. I mean since when is learning more about your instrument a bad thing? Doesn't it make sense that the more you know, the easier it will be to play? What if you are in a band, in a studio or live situation and you are in a situation where the band is playing something other than what you normally play? What if you are recording an album and the producer or one of your band members wants you to play something that requires a "Spanish" feel? How would you do that.
I am a chef and I went to school and learned all the basics and was taught the same things as everyone else. We all learned how to make chicken stock the same way but that doesn't mean you can't branch out and add your own signature to something. Hell, I don't follow any of the same rules that I learned from cooking school but I still remember everything so if someone wants a "classical French" menu I can do it. Same with music. Learn your basics, your theory so you have a reference point and then add your own signature to it. You are only limited by yourself. Find your voice
#8
Quote by chrispantling
Hi,

Trying to get my head around theory which is going well but i just have a quick question. Does truly knowing say the major scale and the chords made up from it mean that when playing you know in your head straight away things like "There are these notes here / they are x intervals apart / playing x notes will sound like x" etc.

I just feel I'm learning things but don't completely know how to apply them.

Thanks


Not quite, those questions never really come up to be answered. Things like I'm playing A Major and I hear a Minor cord just thrown in there, and it doesn't sound like F# Minor, "I bet that he went to a C#m....check, yep...ok here we go". Its a simple understanding of diatonic harmony and the experience with it, that allows me to quickly figure out where a song went, or is going to go - anticipation makes my choices that much more fitting. It doesn't always work that way, they may go a different direction like a G major instead of the anticipated C#m, and in that case my ear catches it and says "ah...b7...cool", and along I go for the ride.

This is a more practical, on the spot application that I find myself frequently in.

Also, in many styles of music the progressions are predictable, I can be in say A, and know the melody is definitely leading to the IV chord, and I switch on a song Ive never heard before, right on cue and people will look at me like I was clairvoyant - its not that at all really, its just understanding the most logical ways that many songs can move takes away their mystery.

These are more common applications I make in the real world.

Best,

Sean