#1
I've been in my current band for two months and the band itself is still relatively new, but we're already playing local shows and we're making plans for recording at least demos if not a proper EP by this summer.

For now obviously we're just going to keep playing as many local shows as we can. But at what point would you say we can expect to start touring at least regionally? I get the feeling that all of us in my band would be new to touring extensively.
#2
Personally, I would wait till you have an EP so that you sell your music at your shows. If people hear you at your show and like you, theyll buy it. Since youre not a well-known act(yet), people will not be inclined to remember you, check your myspace, and wait to order an album/EP.

Going along with that, make sure you have merchandise to sell. It will be one of the major money makers for your band early on.

Make sure you know what youre doing. Know the ins and outs of both your songs and live show. If youre live show isn't good, you'll never impress anyone. Since you seem to be playing lots of local shows, you should be okay, but on that note...

Don't play a ton of local shows. If you keep playing in same area too much, you'll "saturate" your audience. They'll get so used to seeing you, that people will stop coming out to your shows. The only time people can hear your songs right now is when you play, so make them want it.

I know a lot of that stuff was basic, but its important to reiterate. Id say, if youre comfortable with your band and you feel like you have a solid act together, then go for it. Try and get on a tour with well known band, or get on the bill with well known bands at all the venues you book.
#3
Try and get on a tour with well known band, or get on the bill with well known bands at all the venues you book.


TBH, I'd say this was the most important factor. I've seen various small bands doing tours, and in general, they both lose money and don't attract many people to come watch. This will be even more true of someone in the US than over here - long travelling distances and such make each gig come with high costs.

Touring with another band (or even two) helps reduce costs, as you can share equipment and maybe transport to some degree, and increases the number of people who'll come to each show. Particularly if one of the other bands has some degree of a following already.
#4
Wait until you have a physical CD and merch to sell. Once you have that down, its really not too hard scheduling a "DIY" tour.

Just one thing if you end up doing it anytime soon. PLEASE make sure you all have enough money to have and spend on a tour for food and lodging if need be. And for the love of god make sure all of your band members are into it. There is nothing worse than being on the 4th show of your tour and having your drummer say "You know, I'm not really into this anymore."
#5
Quote by punktherock001
And for the love of god make sure all of your band members are into it. There is nothing worse than being on the 4th show of your tour and having your drummer say "You know, I'm not really into this anymore."


+1000

Having a band member come to you and say this will really make you want to punch him/her square in the face. The words alone are just total betrayal.
#6
Quote by heymickey!
+1000

Having a band member come to you and say this will really make you want to punch him/her square in the face. The words alone are just total betrayal.

I'm afraid to ask this, but... how often does this happen?

Judging from this and the other poster, it sounds like it happens more often than I would think. And now that I think of it, there are actually a couple of former bandmates of mine that I could easily see doing something like this.