#2
There's all kinds of info in there that can help you when playing within a given key. You can work out how many sharps or flats there are, and which ones they are. Also being able to find the relative major/minor key can help too. I found it made a bit more sense when i studied how scored music works. Try 8notes.com/theory theres some really easy to follow stuff on there. hope this helps!
#4
The minor parallel has got the exact same sharps and flats. So you learn two things in one.
#5
http://www.circle-of-fifths.net/learn.html

that's teach u about the CO5. Also do the tests. By the end, u'll understand everything. It's explained in simple words.
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#6
Quote by LuckyLu
The minor parallel has got the exact same sharps and flats. So you learn two things in one.

This
#8
Quote by LuckyLu
The minor parallel has got the exact same sharps and flats. So you learn two things in one.


You mean Relative Minor.
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#9
Quote by rockingamer2
You mean Relative Minor.

This man is correct. A parallel minor is the minor of the 'same note' Like C major and C minor are parallel. Relative minor shares the same notes, like C major and A minor
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#10
I never use the circle of fifths...although I still know it, and it's not really important per se it just kinda outlines some concepts in a format that most people prefer...if that makes sense. It makes some things easier to understand with people who have less experience actually reading the music off a staff (from my experience)
#11
You don't really... use... the circle of fifths. It's just there to visually convey the relationships between keys. You can't 'use' the circle of fifths in a song. You can modulate by fifths, but that's modulation, not the circle of fifths.
#14
Quote by timeconsumer09
You don't really... use... the circle of fifths. It's just there to visually convey the relationships between keys. You can't 'use' the circle of fifths in a song. You can modulate by fifths, but that's modulation, not the circle of fifths.



Seems like you've never played a ii V7 I progression in your life.


aka circle of fourths for the special people


If anything going counterclockwise in fourths is actually more common than the other way around.
#15
Quote by Pillo114
Seems like you've never played a ii V7 I progression in your life.


So whenever you see a ii V I, you immediately think of the circle of 5ths? Sure, it can be used to see that the relationship is by 5ths, but it doesn't tell you much besides that. Whenever I see a ii V I, I just know they're related by 5ths, but I have never once said 'hey, I be the circle of 5ths could help me here!' because I don't understand how it would.
#16
It's usefull for a lot of things. I always didnt get it either, but thats because altough everyone always states the importance of the Circle, the actual implementations that are usefull are usualy understated, so it sounds like a slightly intresting but impractical trivia.

But it's not!

The Circle usualy is presented by making a circle using the relative fourths & fifths of the major scale and telling you how manny flats & sharps are in them.

Why is this usefull? Well, for one thing, if you actualy know the Circle by memory you can always tell which key (in major scale) something is in just by knowing how many flats or sharps are in it.

The other most usable thing is that when writing music or improvising, you know that going one step along the 4th or 5th means only one note differs from the previous key, two steps is only two notes differ etc.
When you modulate or change tonality to a different key, they more the next key looks like the previous one, the more "natural" that change sounds.

Knowing this, if we want to have a natural sounding modulation, we change one or two steps. If we want to sound more alien or sudden, we take more steps. If we take a big jump when we are modulating but want to sound a bit more flowing or natural when doing it, we know the inbetween steps we want to take.

It's also handy to memorise every notes perfect fifth and fourth, but thats a bit less of a focus.
#17
Quote by timeconsumer09
So whenever you see a ii V I, you immediately think of the circle of 5ths? Sure, it can be used to see that the relationship is by 5ths, but it doesn't tell you much besides that. Whenever I see a ii V I, I just know they're related by 5ths, but I have never once said 'hey, I be the circle of 5ths could help me here!' because I don't understand how it would.



Of course!

Look at a tune as simple as tune up

http://www.songtrellis.com/picture$913

If you know the Circle you can transpose the whole thing on the spot to any key without any hesitation. Even though the circle might be blatantly obvious to the symmetry of the guitar, it is essential for every instrument and player.

Not only in the term of transposition and understanding of the modulating ii Vs, but as others have said it is a useful aid for determining sharps and flats, and it is the basis of harmony and composition for music from Bieber to Beethoven. And not even simplistic stuff either, stuff like Coltrane Changes and other types of chord movements and substitutions clearly appear within the circle.

You're not going to stand there with a circle while you play and a lot of the stuff you learn from other places, but there's no denying the value of it.
#18
In short:
1st, 4th (+5 frets / -7 frets), and 5th (+7 frets/ -5 frets) note of a key. All these have the same minor/major. For instance:

A minor: Am, Bdim, C, Dm, Em, F, G
D major: D, Em, F#m, G, A, Bm, C#dim

Tip to find it on a fretboard:
| - | - | - | - | - | - | - |
| - | - | - | - | - | - | - |
| - | - | - | - | - | - | - |
| - | - | - | O | - | O | - |
| - | - | - | R | - | - | - |
| - | O | - | O | - | - | - |

I assume that you know that for instance 7th fret on the E-string and 2nd fret on the A-string is the same note.
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#19
Quote by Pillo114
Of course!

Look at a tune as simple as tune up

http://www.songtrellis.com/picture$913

If you know the Circle you can transpose the whole thing on the spot to any key without any hesitation. Even though the circle might be blatantly obvious to the symmetry of the guitar, it is essential for every instrument and player.

Not only in the term of transposition and understanding of the modulating ii Vs, but as others have said it is a useful aid for determining sharps and flats, and it is the basis of harmony and composition for music from Bieber to Beethoven. And not even simplistic stuff either, stuff like Coltrane Changes and other types of chord movements and substitutions clearly appear within the circle.

You're not going to stand there with a circle while you play and a lot of the stuff you learn from other places, but there's no denying the value of it.


I guess I just don't see the value in it because all those things have become pretty natural to me over time. I often have to transpose music on sight to very different keys, so I've just come to know how to do it without thinking about key signatures and such. I suppose you could use it in the ways you described as a tool to help build these skills though. Although, as with all things music, after you do something long enough, it becomes second nature.